Scotland

22 May 19
The Sun
We’re waving goodbye to another Premier League and fantasy football season. But dry your eyes, because we’re not quite done just yet, with Dream Team points still up for grabs in the upcoming Europa League final AND the Champions League final. So don’t give up on those mini-league ambitions. Anyway, here’s Wonderwall With the league season done and dusted though, we’ve decided to look back at some of the campaign’s surprise fantasy football stars. Using the 4-3-3 formation, we’ve made a Dream Team XI of the players we weren’t expecting to score quite so many points this term. GOALKEEPER The Philippines finest He might’ve suffered relegation with his club Cardiff City, but Neil Etheridge (78 points) can hold his head up with pride after a season worthy of the Premier League. His final game of the campaign was particularly impressive, as he made 10 saves and kept a clean sheet against Man United in Cardiff’s 2-0 win at Old Trafford to win the Star Man award. DEFENCE Doherty has been a fantasy football hero this season Few of you will be surprised to see Wolves’ defenders Willy Boly (114) and Matt Doherty (189) in our back four. Doherty was especially impressive and became a Dream Team favourite as the season progressed. Lucas Digne (168) will perhaps go down as one of the signings of the season and was unlucky not to make the Premier League’s Team of the Year, while Shane Duffy (129) was one of the few Brighton players to finish the campaign with their reputation intact. MIDFIELD Creator Bournemouth will no doubt be fighting off the Premier League’s big teams this summer after Ryan Fraser’s (158) outstanding run-out. The Scotland international notched 14 assists in the league – just one behind the season’s top playmaker Eden Hazard – and formed a dazzling double-act with Callum Wilson. Nathan Redmond (123) benefited greatly from Southampton’s appointment of Ralph Hasenhuttl mid-season, while Luka Milivojevic (140) continued to be Crystal Palace’s Mr. Reliable from 12-yards out with 10 goals from the penalty spot. ATTACK Mexican wave The most impressive player in our team is Wolves’ Mexican forward Raul Jimenez (193), who rubbed shoulders with some of Dream Team’s best points-scorers with a tasty haul of 17 goals, including four in their brilliant FA Cup run. Joining him in our surprising trio of attackers is Fulham’s Aleksandar Mitrovic (115), who’ll no doubt he looking to stay in the Premier League for next season after the Cottagers relegation, and Newcastle’s Ayoze Perez (134), who benefited from a late-season flourish of goals. [bc_video video_id=”6038463140001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Man City in pole position to sign £65m Rodrigo Hernandez from Atletico Madrid”] [article-rail-section title=”READ MORE FANTASY FOOTBALL:” posts_category=”11445″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”recent” /]
22 May 19
The Lochside Press

The Scottish Government has been urged to help get the Waverley sailing again. The iconic paddle steamer will not sail at all this year, after the devastating news that it needs a new boiler – with an estimated cost of £2m. And yesterday Dumbarton constituency MSP Jackie Baillie raised a question with the Scottish Government […]

22 May 19
MarileeWein.com

DOUBLE GENEALOGY: The ADOPTION WITNESS. Update 4, Addendum 8 Genealogical bereavement: the profound sense of loss on realizing that the long–departed soul under lengthy intensive scrutiny is not an ancestor. The state of grief and disbelief that must pass before another target can be tackled. Alas, we deem that Jane’s John is not ours. Those […]

22 May 19
The Sun
NOSTALGIC pictures show when Britain was the CENTRE of the world’s steel industry. Plants in Sheffield, Port Talbot, Doncaster and Rotherham made the country a booming metals powerhouse for decades. A worker checks the quality of a giant saw blade at Edgar Allen’s steel foundry in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, 1963 Generations of families worked in the factories, communities were built and Britain prospered. Black and white snaps capture the prosperity and relentless production of the steel industry in its hey-day as well as the men and women who worked the mills, plants and factories. But 150 years on from the start of Britain’s steel boom – hope for the future lies in tatters. British Steel – the product of 14 major companies first merged in the 1960s – has entered into insolvency proceedings, putting the future of thousands of jobs in doubt. A worker cleaning new carving knife blades at a Sheffield steel factory in 1959 Steel potter George Goodwin, who creates clay for crucibles, works at a plant in Sheffield in 1949 An employee of the Abbey Steelworks of Port Talbot measures a roll of steel Workers in the washroom facility at a steelworks, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, 1964 Workers leaving the Steel Company of Wales works at Port Talbot, at the end of the afternoon shift, 1949 The British steel industry has been fighting for survival for decades with major plants across the country closing. It was first nationalised by Clement Atlee in 1951, which saw the formation of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. Two years Later Winston Churchill’s Tory government reversed the merger and it was not until 1967 that Harold Wilson’s Labour administration renationalised the industry. But the 1970s would provide new challenges, with a recession wreaking havoc for British Steel. Men work on making and repairing locomotives for the Great Northern Railway at Doncaster Works A worker at Vickers Naval Gun Making factory in Sheffield, stir molten steel in a furnace during the Second World War A huge steel plate is withdrawn from a furnace at the Doncaster works of L.N.E.R. in South Yorkshire, 1936 The Queen Mother, then the Duchess of York, visits Firth and Brown’s Steel Works in Sheffield The company later focused on steel production in five areas: South Wales, South Yorkshire, Scunthorpe, Teesside and Scotland. However, in a blow for the firm’s workers, employee numbers were slashed by Margaret Thatcher from 142,000 in 1980 to just 52,000 in 1988. Sadly the early 1990s did not herald a brighter dawn for the industry. While the country battled another recession, a plant in  Ravenscraig was closed and 1,800 jobs were lost  – marking the end of steelmaking in Scotland. The demand for steel dropped and it wasn’t until 1993 that British Steel started to post profits. British Steel men work at a foundry A worker at the Steel, Peech and Toyer works in Sheffield, Yorkshire A worker operating equipment at the Abbey Steelworks, Port Talbot, in October 1961 A worker makes steel bill hooks and knives in Sheffield by hand in 1932 Workers from Stewarts and Lloyds in Glasgow produce steel tubes for the proposed oil pipeline of the Iraq Petroleum Company Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (left) in conversation with craven lathe operator Joe Howsley in the Central Repair shop at the Steel Company of Wales at Margam, Port Talbot, 1952 In 1999, British Steel merged with Koninklijke Hoogovens, the biggest steelmaker in Europe, to form Corus. But eight years later Corus was bought by Indian firm, Tata Steel and sadly, the closure of plants in Redcar, Scunthorpe, Scotland and South Wales all followed. Barely a decade after Tata took over, it was bought by Greybull Capital for a nominal one pound. Greybull, which has specialised in trying to turn around struggling businesses, renamed the business British Steel. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”316″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Earlier this year British Steel was forced to go cap-in-hand to the government and ask for a £120million loan to pay emissions trading compliance costs. Greybull was hoping to get a further £30million in funding to keep the company going in the short term. But sadly, today British Steel collapsed with devastating news for employers at plants across the country. Steel worker Peter Dixon walks with his children through Port Talbot, South Wales in 1964 The rolling mill of Peech and Tozer steel plant in Rotherham The Abbey Works, Port Talbot, once the largest steel plant in Europe, in 1951 We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
22 May 19
The Scottish Sun
NOSTALGIC pictures show when Britain was the CENTRE of the world’s steel industry. Plants in Sheffield, Port Talbot, Doncaster and Rotherham made the country a booming metals powerhouse for decades. A worker checks the quality of a giant saw blade at Edgar Allen’s steel foundry in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, 1963 Generations of families worked in the factories, communities were built and Britain prospered. Black and white snaps capture the prosperity and relentless production of the steel industry in its hey-day as well as the men and women who worked the mills, plants and factories. But 150 years on from the start of Britain’s steel boom – hope for the future lies in tatters. British Steel – the product of 14 major companies first merged in the 1960s – has entered into insolvency proceedings, putting the future of thousands of jobs in doubt. A worker cleaning new carving knife blades at a Sheffield steel factory in 1959 Steel potter George Goodwin, who creates clay for crucibles, works at a plant in Sheffield in 1949 An employee of the Abbey Steelworks of Port Talbot measures a roll of steel Workers in the washroom facility at a steelworks, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, 1964 Workers leaving the Steel Company of Wales works at Port Talbot, at the end of the afternoon shift, 1949 The British steel industry has been fighting for survival for decades with major plants across the country closing. It was first nationalised by Clement Atlee in 1951, which saw the formation of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. Two years Later Winston Churchill’s Tory government reversed the merger and it was not until 1967 that Harold Wilson’s Labour administration renationalised the industry. But the 1970s would provide new challenges, with a recession wreaking havoc for British Steel. Men work on making and repairing locomotives for the Great Northern Railway at Doncaster Works A worker at Vickers Naval Gun Making factory in Sheffield, stir molten steel in a furnace during the Second World War A huge steel plate is withdrawn from a furnace at the Doncaster works of L.N.E.R. in South Yorkshire, 1936 The Queen Mother, then the Duchess of York, visits Firth and Brown’s Steel Works in Sheffield The company later focused on steel production in five areas: South Wales, South Yorkshire, Scunthorpe, Teesside and Scotland. However, in a blow for the firm’s workers, employee numbers were slashed by Margaret Thatcher from 142,000 in 1980 to just 52,000 in 1988. Sadly the early 1990s did not herald a brighter dawn for the industry. While the country battled another recession, a plant in  Ravenscraig was closed and 1,800 jobs were lost  – marking the end of steelmaking in Scotland. The demand for steel dropped and it wasn’t until 1993 that British Steel started to post profits. British Steel men work at a foundry A worker at the Steel, Peech and Toyer works in Sheffield, Yorkshire A worker operating equipment at the Abbey Steelworks, Port Talbot, in October 1961 A worker makes steel bill hooks and knives in Sheffield by hand in 1932 Workers from Stewarts and Lloyds in Glasgow produce steel tubes for the proposed oil pipeline of the Iraq Petroleum Company Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (left) in conversation with craven lathe operator Joe Howsley in the Central Repair shop at the Steel Company of Wales at Margam, Port Talbot, 1952 In 1999, British Steel merged with Koninklijke Hoogovens, the biggest steelmaker in Europe, to form Corus. But eight years later Corus was bought by Indian firm, Tata Steel and sadly, the closure of plants in Redcar, Scunthorpe, Scotland and South Wales all followed. Barely a decade after Tata took over, it was bought by Greybull Capital for a nominal one pound. Greybull, which has specialised in trying to turn around struggling businesses, renamed the business British Steel. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”2″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Earlier this year British Steel was forced to go cap-in-hand to the government and ask for a £120million loan to pay emissions trading compliance costs. Greybull was hoping to get a further £30million in funding to keep the company going in the short term. But sadly, today British Steel collapsed with devastating news for employers at plants across the country. Steel worker Peter Dixon walks with his children through Port Talbot, South Wales in 1964 The rolling mill of Peech and Tozer steel plant in Rotherham The Abbey Works, Port Talbot, once the largest steel plant in Europe, in 1951 We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
22 May 19
Darwin Onthetrail

I was on my way to the Gorge. I didn’t know if I would ever be back to this magical place; the place where it happened. After years of trial and error, fears and discomfort, I finally relaxed and let it all in. I first fell in love with backpacking in Red River Gorge (Daniel […]

22 May 19
Romancing the Dispatcher

Title: HURT Series: The Hurt Series #1 Author: Lydia Michaels Genre: Psychological Thriller/Dark Romance Release Date: May 21, 2019     Award Winning Author, Lydia Michaels, enters the world of DARK ROMANCE with an unforgettably suspenseful psychological thriller!   IT’S GOING TO HURT…   Callan MacGregor might speak with the eloquence of a Scottish poet, but […]

22 May 19
Trust Deed Scotland

Trust Deeds Scotland in Caerphilly #Caerphilly Trust Deeds Scotland in Caerphilly #Caerphilly — Trust Deed Scotland (@uktrustdeed) May 22, 2019 From https://trustdeedscotland.tumblr.com/post/185059849148

22 May 19

Theresa May’s failure to deliver the UK’s withdrawal from the EU by 29 March has revitalised the populist right, but Labour’s electoral coalition is just as fragile.  On 1 March 1973, Dick Taverne, a former Labour MP, won a landslide victory at a parliamentary by-election in Lincoln. Deselected as a candidate over his devout pro-Europeanism, […]

22 May 19
Reviews and Promos by Nyx

The College Pact Series Author: Gina Azzi Genre: Coming of Age/New Adult/College Romance Cover Design: Regina Wamba, Mae I Design Releasing June 4, 2019 Sexy surfers. Epic parties. Wild nights. Welcome to my senior year of college. At least, this is what I imagine when I accept a semester-long medical internship in LA, California. But […]

22 May 19
59% YES for Independent Scotland

If you haven’t already, please like the page https://www.facebook.com/target59 Also invite your friends to like it too and please share this post. Show your support on your profile http://twibbon.com/support/target-59-3

22 May 19

AJ's Book re-Marks

The College Pact Series Author: Gina Azzi Genre: Coming of Age/New Adult/College Romance Cover Design: Regina Wamba, Mae I Design Releasing June 4, 2019 Sexy surfers. Epic parties. Wild nights. Welcome to my senior year of college. At least, this is what I imagine when I accept a semester-long medical internship in LA, California. But […]

22 May 19
Money and Business Thoughts

Loot, the digital current account aimed at students and millennials, has called in administrators after appearing to have run out of cash. According to sources, the U.K. fintech was unable to raise additional funding in time after a potential sale to banking giant RBS fell through. Intriguingly, Royal Bank of Scotland Group indirectly owned a […]

22 May 19
Book Addict Rambles

The College Pact Series Author: Gina Azzi Genre: Coming of Age/New Adult/College Romance Cover Design: Regina Wamba, Mae I Design Releasing June 4, 2019 Sexy surfers. Epic parties. Wild nights. Welcome to my senior year of college. At least, this is what I imagine when I accept a semester-long medical internship in LA, California. But […]

22 May 19
Sonia SO and Associates

Loot, the digital current account aimed at students and millennials, has called in administrators after appearing to have run out of cash. According to sources, the U.K. fintech was unable to raise additional funding in time after a potential sale to banking giant RBS fell through. Intriguingly, Royal Bank of Scotland Group indirectly owned a […]