Simmons

17 Jul 19
News Directory

David Griffin fully restored the New Orleans Pelicans roster this summer. Jrue Holiday is the only major contributor to return, undoubtedly the leader of the squad. Alvin Gentry will have many lineup options with the deepest Pelicans roster ever trained. Gayle Benson hired David Griffin he hired the New Orleans Pelicans as a championship class […]

17 Jul 19
WV Illustrated
When TJ Simmons arrived in Morgantown, the West Virginia offense was full of big names like Will Grier, David Sills and Gary Jennings. Simmons was definitely a contributor on the offense — reeling in 28 catches for 341 yards in 12 games — but he was far from the first option. This season, Simmons is presumably going to be the top guy in the Mountaineers’ receiving corps, which may lead fans to wonder: can this year’s squad step up and fill the shoes of the “stars” that have departed? “A lot of people don’t think we’ve got star power, they don’t think we have the players to do the job,” Simmons said at Big 12 Media Days. “The challenge to us is going to be to show everybody what we can do.” As a redshirt junior in his second season at West Virginia, Simmons is now one of the leaders in the locker room as well as on the field. With all of the changes being made around the program and the lack of experience at many position groups, this is a crucial role of which Simmons sees the value. Austin Kendall and Jack Allison are still ostensibly vying for the top quarterback job since Neal Brown has yet to name a starter. As the top pass-catcher, Simmons says he is doing what he can to take some of the pressure off the signal callers in practice. “Just being able to be a shoulder for them to lean on, because I feel like I’ve played more games than both of our quarterbacks. I have a little more experience than both of them,” Simmons explained. “Just being able to keep them calm, and just let them know we’ve got their back no matter what.” He’s not wrong. In his first year at West Virginia, Simmons played in all 12 games, and before his transfer from Alabama, the Birmingham native saw time in another 12 contests for the Crimson Tide. Meanwhile, Allison and Kendall have combined for 13 career game appearances. Much of Simmons’s responsibility is in his own backyard, so to speak. With the departure of Sills, Jennings and Marcus Simms (the one, two and three receivers of 2018), there are several new faces in the receiving corps. Sam James, a redshirt freshman from Richmond Hill, Georgia, is a name that many Mountaineer fans could become familiar with in the coming months. “Sam — he’s a very explosive, very fast, fast kid,” Simmons described. “He picks up on things, like, he’s smart. He knows that he has to be a guy this year, he knows he has to step up and make those plays.” A former high school track star, James appeared in four games last season despite getting a redshirt. His lack of experience has led Simmons to take him under his wing and show him what goes on between the lines — whether it has to do with football or not. “I think I push him more than I push anybody. I treat Sam like my little brother,” Simmons explained. “I might pick on him a little bit, I might push him around a little bit, but that’s just because whenever game time comes, he doesn’t have to worry about a corner bullying him or nothing like that.”
17 Jul 19
NAIA Hoops Report

The first weekend of The Basketball Tournament starts this weekend (19th-21st). It is one of my favorite summer basketball events, and even more so since they have plenty of NAIA connections associated with the teams. If you haven’t read our previous article, there are plenty of NAIA connections on teams this year. Some of the […]

17 Jul 19
School Matters

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who died Tuesday, is being remembered for a lot of things: His evolution from Republican corporate attorney to a leader of the court’s liberal bloc. His common-sense and non-ideological approach to the law. And yes, his snappy bow ties. Those of us who care about education should remember […]

17 Jul 19
The Australian

Kylie Jenner is reportedly OVER Jordyn Woods acting like a victim post Tristan Thompson cheating scandal…PLUS…Jordyn Woods reacts to that Kylie Skin girls trip that’s been taking over your feeds…apparently she’s a grown woman who could care less. FINALLY…Ben Simmons sisters CONTINUES to go in on Kendall Jenner by accusing her of disrespecting Ben’s mom…but Kendall is apparently NOT going to acknowledge that accusation or any of the others. I’ve got the latest on this…plus the latest on Kylie and Jordyn right now so stay tuned.

17 Jul 19
AviTrader Aviation News

Baines Simmons, part of the Consulting & Training division of global aviation services group Air Partner, has appointed Mike Da Silva as consultant. He will report directly to Mike Wallace, Head of Operations. De Silva is a practitioner and manager in Initial Airworthiness, Certification, Test and Evaluation, and Safety Management Systems (SMS), covering both military […]

17 Jul 19
TrackSide Online

Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing Pre-Race Notes  Iowa 300 – Iowa Speedway Round 12 of 17 in the 2019 NTT IndyCar Series  DATE:      July 19-20, 2019 PRACTICE BROADCASTS:     Live on INDYCAR Pass, the direct-to-consumer streaming product from NBC Sports Gold, on Friday from 11-12 p.m. ET and 7-8 p.m. ET.  Also live on the Advance […]

17 Jul 19
The Australian

Computing is about to take a quantum leap — thanks to a major breakthrough by renowned physicist and former Australian of the Year Michelle Simmons.

17 Jul 19
Paradise Post
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]   Brooklyn Nets general manager Sean Marks discovered Kevin Durant’s plans for free agency the way everybody else did: By Instagram. How Marks knew Durant was being sincere? K.D. wasn’t using a burner account. But we digress. As you can imagine, Marks was interested in knowing why Durant was throwing in with his outfit. Appearing on WFAN on Tuesday, Marks quoted Durant as saying, “I love how you guys play. I see how hard you guys play. You were never out of games. We could never take you guys lightly.” Off the cuff, that seems a curious assessment. In Durant’s three seasons with Golden State, the Warriors were 6-0 against Brooklyn with an average margin of victory of 12.5 points. Then again, a Bleacher Report story, using data extracted from NBA.com, revealed that Brooklyn played a pace almost identical to the Warriors. The Nets hoisted the fifth-most 3-point attempts (the Warriors were eighth). So Durant could safely assume that he would be playing a familiar (and successful) style. Assuming his move was more about joining the Nets than leaving the Warriors. It’s difficult, even after months of rumors that Durant was poised to ditch the Bay Area, to know why he soured on the Warriors. Many theories have been proffered. One intriguing scenario was advanced Monday by ESPN’s Brian Windhorst. “I think even if he doesn’t get hurt, even if they win the title, I think there’s a good chance he was leaving,” Windhorst said. “You never know for sure. The thing about the Warriors, they were very alarmed after winning two titles that Durant didn’t seem to have the joy. We knew he suffered the downsides of what it meant to come to the Warriors. When he raised that Bill Russell trophy twice (as the NBA Finals MVP) and didn’t have the joy, they were worried last summer. And as the season went along it made it even worse.” Durant’s ennui predates the second consecutive championship. Steve Kerr and Warriors consultant Steve Nash reportedly noticed it the summer after the 2017 championship. In March 2018 he was a reigning NBA champion and on his way to a second consecutive title. And he said this on Bill Simmons’ podcast: “After we won the championship, I had Taco Bell and it ran through me just like it would a normal person. I thought I was immune to everything, but no. That’s the perception of it all — we’re just immortal. We are normal people who are really good at what we do. But at the end of the day, we go to sleep just like everybody else. We really put on our pants just like everybody else. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“It made me realize that I am not king anything because we won a championship.” The notion of the tortured artist comes to mind. Having enjoyed Durant’s athletic gifts the past three years, here’s wishing he finds what he’s been looking for.
17 Jul 19
The Reporter
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]   Brooklyn Nets general manager Sean Marks discovered Kevin Durant’s plans for free agency the way everybody else did: By Instagram. How Marks knew Durant was being sincere? K.D. wasn’t using a burner account. But we digress. As you can imagine, Marks was interested in knowing why Durant was throwing in with his outfit. Appearing on WFAN on Tuesday, Marks quoted Durant as saying, “I love how you guys play. I see how hard you guys play. You were never out of games. We could never take you guys lightly.” Off the cuff, that seems a curious assessment. In Durant’s three seasons with Golden State, the Warriors were 6-0 against Brooklyn with an average margin of victory of 12.5 points. Then again, a Bleacher Report story, using data extracted from NBA.com, revealed that Brooklyn played a pace almost identical to the Warriors. The Nets hoisted the fifth-most 3-point attempts (the Warriors were eighth). So Durant could safely assume that he would be playing a familiar (and successful) style. Assuming his move was more about joining the Nets than leaving the Warriors. It’s difficult, even after months of rumors that Durant was poised to ditch the Bay Area, to know why he soured on the Warriors. Many theories have been proffered. One intriguing scenario was advanced Monday by ESPN’s Brian Windhorst. “I think even if he doesn’t get hurt, even if they win the title, I think there’s a good chance he was leaving,” Windhorst said. “You never know for sure. The thing about the Warriors, they were very alarmed after winning two titles that Durant didn’t seem to have the joy. We knew he suffered the downsides of what it meant to come to the Warriors. When he raised that Bill Russell trophy twice (as the NBA Finals MVP) and didn’t have the joy, they were worried last summer. And as the season went along it made it even worse.” Durant’s ennui predates the second consecutive championship. Steve Kerr and Warriors consultant Steve Nash reportedly noticed it the summer after the 2017 championship. In March 2018 he was a reigning NBA champion and on his way to a second consecutive title. And he said this on Bill Simmons’ podcast: “After we won the championship, I had Taco Bell and it ran through me just like it would a normal person. I thought I was immune to everything, but no. That’s the perception of it all — we’re just immortal. We are normal people who are really good at what we do. But at the end of the day, we go to sleep just like everybody else. We really put on our pants just like everybody else. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“It made me realize that I am not king anything because we won a championship.” The notion of the tortured artist comes to mind. Having enjoyed Durant’s athletic gifts the past three years, here’s wishing he finds what he’s been looking for.
17 Jul 19
Times-Standard
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /]   Brooklyn Nets general manager Sean Marks discovered Kevin Durant’s plans for free agency the way everybody else did: By Instagram. How Marks knew Durant was being sincere? K.D. wasn’t using a burner account. But we digress. As you can imagine, Marks was interested in knowing why Durant was throwing in with his outfit. Appearing on WFAN on Tuesday, Marks quoted Durant as saying, “I love how you guys play. I see how hard you guys play. You were never out of games. We could never take you guys lightly.” Off the cuff, that seems a curious assessment. In Durant’s three seasons with Golden State, the Warriors were 6-0 against Brooklyn with an average margin of victory of 12.5 points. Then again, a Bleacher Report story, using data extracted from NBA.com, revealed that Brooklyn played a pace almost identical to the Warriors. The Nets hoisted the fifth-most 3-point attempts (the Warriors were eighth). So Durant could safely assume that he would be playing a familiar (and successful) style. Assuming his move was more about joining the Nets than leaving the Warriors. It’s difficult, even after months of rumors that Durant was poised to ditch the Bay Area, to know why he soured on the Warriors. Many theories have been proffered. One intriguing scenario was advanced Monday by ESPN’s Brian Windhorst. “I think even if he doesn’t get hurt, even if they win the title, I think there’s a good chance he was leaving,” Windhorst said. “You never know for sure. The thing about the Warriors, they were very alarmed after winning two titles that Durant didn’t seem to have the joy. We knew he suffered the downsides of what it meant to come to the Warriors. When he raised that Bill Russell trophy twice (as the NBA Finals MVP) and didn’t have the joy, they were worried last summer. And as the season went along it made it even worse.” Durant’s ennui predates the second consecutive championship. Steve Kerr and Warriors consultant Steve Nash reportedly noticed it the summer after the 2017 championship. In March 2018 he was a reigning NBA champion and on his way to a second consecutive title. And he said this on Bill Simmons’ podcast: “After we won the championship, I had Taco Bell and it ran through me just like it would a normal person. I thought I was immune to everything, but no. That’s the perception of it all — we’re just immortal. We are normal people who are really good at what we do. But at the end of the day, we go to sleep just like everybody else. We really put on our pants just like everybody else. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“It made me realize that I am not king anything because we won a championship.” The notion of the tortured artist comes to mind. Having enjoyed Durant’s athletic gifts the past three years, here’s wishing he finds what he’s been looking for.