Sitka Gear

18 Feb 19
JobbieCrew.com

Founded in 1973, Tall Ships America is a non-profit organization dedicated to enriching youth education through character building and leadership programs aboard tall ships. It is the hub for tall ship activity, expertise, and information in North America, and is commended by Congress as the Sail Training organization representing the United States in the international […]

16 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

Custom-made Show Guitar. Only 24 ever made, between 2012-2013. Never released for mass production used for trade shows only. Body Type Dreadnought Neck wood mahogany Solid wood top Alaskan Sitka spruce Solid wood back/sides Indian rosewood Natural gloss finish Under saddle pickup Hand made in China includes deluxe gig-bag Has a few small dings does […]

15 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

The flagship guitar of the Cort acoustic series, this guitar butts right up to the big boys and shows them what’s up. Boasting a SOLID Rosewood back and side coupled with a solid Sitka Spruce top and all the amenities like maple inlays, Grover tuners, a REAL bone nut, Rosewood bridge and finger board the […]

15 Feb 19

From Leupold: BEAVERTON, Ore. — Building upon the success of the existing 15×56 model, Leupold & Stevens, Inc. has added 8×42, 10×42, 10×50, and 12×50 variants to the BX®- 5 SantiamTM HD binocular line. “The BX-5 Santiam HD line is purpose-built for the relentless, diehard hunter that may need to glass for hours on end,” […]

14 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

Featuring smaller Grand Concert body made from a solid Sitka spruce top with layered sapele back & sides, the Academy Series A12e is a great choice for fingerstyle players, players with a light touch, and players who find comfort in a more compact instrument.

09 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

This is a gorgeous Batson GC22 Americana electric acoustic guitar.  It has a sitka spruce top with no hole.  The hole is on the side.  The sides, neck, and back are mahogany.  The fretboard, bridge, and tailpiece are ebony.  Bone nut & bridge, and black chrome hardware.  Batson Clear Voice piezo UST with tone and […]

06 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

1974 D-35 C.F. Martin comes with a generic molded flight case. Sitka Spruce top and Rosewood back & sides. small crack on the neck binding that does not affect playability. neck has slight playing wear and slight buckle rash, bottom lacquer on binding is slightly worn out from being a case for years, otherwise no […]

05 Feb 19
Quartz
Electric guitars haven’t changed all that much since the most popular designs were created in the 1950s, and acoustic guitars haven’t really changed in the last hundred years. Generally, that’s for good reasons—why fix what isn’t broken?—but it also leads many professional musicians (or gear-obsessed amateurs) to hoard countless guitars to capture all the various tones and sounds they like. Fender, one of the oldest electric guitar companies, has a new idea. Fender asked me if I’d like to test its latest creation, the $2,000 Acoustasonic Telecaster. Although I’m a (quite poor) guitarist, I thought this was a bit strange at first, given that I mainly cover technology, not music. But it was soon revealed that this electric-acoustic hybrid guitar wasn’t like anything I’d seen before. It wanted to be just about every type of guitar in one, using a combination of electric pickups and processing technology. First, a quick lesson in how electric guitars work. Most hybrids like this tend to use what’s called a “piezoelectric pickup,” which translates the pressure of the movement of strings when playing the guitar into sounds. They tend to give that tinny, singer-songwriter-at-a-coffee-shop sound that isn’t exactly soothing, which is why many acoustic guitarists prefer to just use a microphone set up near their guitar to get a more accurate representation of how the guitar sounds. Electric guitars tend to use magnetic pickups, which translate the vibration of metal strings into electric signals, and often produce a far warmer sound. The Acoustasonic, in sunburst. Fender’s new guitar has both kinds of pickups, which isn’t exactly a new idea in and of itself—John Lennon had an acoustic guitar with a magnetic pickup jammed into it in 1962—but what Fender does with the pickups in this guitar produced something I’d never heard come out of a single instrument before. The Acoustasonic has two knobs on the front of the guitar, like most other electric  guitars. The first one, as is commonly the case, just controls the guitar’s volume when it’s plugged in, but the second is a piece of technical wizardry. In tandem with the pickup selector switch, this knob changes the guitar’s tone to mimic 10 different sounds—for each notch on the selector switch, the second knob can produce two sounds, one by turning it all the way to the bottom, and one turning it all the way to the top. You can also blend each of those two sounds together by leaving the knob somewhere in the middle. According to Fender, the sounds the Acoustasonic can recreate are: 5 – Core acoustics: rosewood dreadnaught / rosewood auditorium 4 – Alternative acoustics: maple small body / mahogany dreadnaught 3 – Enhanced harmonics: sitka spruce / rosewood dreadnaught 2 – Acoustic / electric blend: mahogany dreadnaught with Fender electric 1 – Electric: Fender clean electric / Fender fat electric If all these guitar types don’t mean anything to you, this probably isn’t the guitar for you. But if you’re a gigging session musician who is sick of lugging around multiple guitars or effects pedals to only use for a few minutes, then this might be just what you’re after—assuming you can get over the sticker shock. The Acoustasonic is about the size of a standard Telecaster, considerably lighter than one, and can produce a truly surprising range of tones, mimicking far more expensive woods than it’s made out of. Some of the tones—especially the core acoustic and electric sounds—are sounds I’d love to play and record with all the time. The guitar even sounds surprisingly bright when not plugged in—it won’t blow away a full acoustic guitar, but it packs a punch given the size of the body. Depending on who you ask, guitar sales are falling or possibly rising, but the financial troubles of Fender rival Gibson, along with those of retailers such as Guitar Center, are likely signs of the instrument’s waning popularity. As amazing as the Acoustasonic is, it’s not likely going to find wide appeal, given its price tag, and Fender told me it was aiming for the “pro-sumer” market with this model, rather like the chameleonic Mustang amplifier it released last year. Presumably the hope will be that much like other tech gadgets, what starts off as expensive gets more affordable over time. While I really enjoyed messing around with the Acoustasonic, Fender gave the guitar to talented musicians who came up with some truly creative songs with it. If this is the direction the company is going, though, it definitely signals there’s a ton of potential left in the bolted-together pieces of wood and electronics that Leo Fender assembled and that kicked off a musical revolution. I just hope it gets more affordable.
03 Feb 19
Fly to Work Kansas!

Starting Small Most people who settle on a wooden aircraft start with wing ribs. They are small, light, and have the cheapest material so mistakes are a lot lower in capital on ribs. I’d much rather make a mistake on a rib which costs a few bucks over screwing up the fuselage. Since the construction […]

02 Feb 19
The Warrenton Warrior Reader

Thank you for selecting the Top 12 Streets in Warrenton, Oregon. Whether you’ve been click-baited, mislead through Facebook ads, voted for this topic, or are a devoted fan of Warrenton Warrior’s reflections on North Coast ways of life, you’re in for a real treat this week. The Warrenton Warrior is the first to admit that […]

02 Feb 19

Stimulintellect

Ladies Who Hunt –Sitka Gear Expands Women’s Line https://t.co/4JBeCeqG13 — Mia Anstine (@MiaAnstine) February 2, 2019 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/stimulintellect

02 Feb 19

Stimulintellect

Ladies Who Hunt –Sitka Gear Expands Women’s Line https://t.co/4JBeCeqG13 — Mia Anstine (@MiaAnstine) February 2, 2019 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

01 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

Grand Concert body, solid Koa with Sitka Spruce top. Short (24 7/8″) scale neck with an Ebony fingerboard. Expression 2 pickup system delivers a clear, natural sounding amplified tone for gigging or recording. This guitar is a fingerpicker’s dream! Comes with a deluxe hardshell case.

01 Feb 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

Excellent condition, very clean and  well maintained.  With a very light amount of slight surface scratches to the top and back, and very little if any evidence of fret wear, this guitar has been very lightly played.   No wear to note at all to sides, back, or headstock.  No chips, cracks or dents.   All solid wood […]

31 Jan 19
Hunting blogs

This is a portion from Chasing Editorial manager Andrew McKean’s book, How to Chase Everything, which is accessible here. Look out for more species and how to chase them here on the Chasing blog Airsoft Gear uk. Dark followed deer influence ghosts to appear to be emphatically self-evident. These stormy backwoods apparitions are cousins of […]

30 Jan 19
Sam Ash Used Gear

This Taylor 618ce Grand Orchestra all solid wood acoustic is bright and booming. From the first strum it is just a cannon out of the sound hole. Its sides and back are all solid maple with a “Brown Sugar” stain finish, the top is solid Sitka Spruce, the neck is Hard Rock Maple, it has […]