Skechers

20 Mar 19
Trendy Technical Reviews

The term ‘outdoor gear” primarily comprises apparels such as clothing and footwear and also includes non-apparels such as tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, and other equipment. With the rising focus on health, people from across the world have started concentrating on outdoor activities so as to stay fit. Hence, the demand for outdoor gears has been […]

20 Mar 19
Storiesandstitches

This morning I read two articles on shoes, the first with the seductive title “Sex,power,oppression: why women wear heels.” “Running down that aisle.” another debate, described the rise of the trainer as designer bridal wear. Whilst both articles quite rightly probed the questions of mysogyny, feminism and women’s rights , they overlooked what is more […]

20 Mar 19
cryptathon

Today, my 75 mile drive home was delayed due to one thing or the other, and I pulled into my drive at 7:35, giving me about 10 minutes to divest my working clothes, freshen up a little, don my running clothes and take the kid to Taekwondo class. In the rush, as I realised just […]

20 Mar 19
Mayuri blog

The global athletic footwear market comprises of few key players. According to a report by Transparency Market Research, the key players in the market are adopting various strategies to keep the consumers engaged. These strategies include robust distribution channel, iconic brand presence, engaging in luxurious and large retail spaces. These few players monopolize large part of the […]

20 Mar 19
market growth

The Footwear Manufacturing market report is a complete research on the current state of the Footwear Manufacturing market with a focus on the regional market. This report presents the global Footwear Manufacturing market size (value, production, and consumption), splits the breakdown (data status 2013-2018 and forecast to ‘2025’), by manufacturers, region, type, and application. This study also analyzes […]

20 Mar 19
Hello World

Global Footwear Market Footwear is garments worn on the feet, which originally serves to purpose of protection against adversities of the environment, usually regarding ground textures and temperature. The classification of Footwear includes Daily Use, Business, Sports and Other Type. In 2017 sales of Daily Use is about 43%, and the proportion is in decreasing […]

20 Mar 19
MarketPresswire

(EMAILWIRE.COM, March 19, 2019 ) Overview of Footwear Market Footwear refers to garments worn on the feet, which originally serves to purpose of protection against adversities of the environment, usually regarding ground textures and temperature. Footwear in the manner of shoes therefore primarily serves the purpose to ease the locomotion and prevent injuries. Secondly footwear […]

20 Mar 19
CharaBiz.Asia

After a 3-year long separation, One Piece Run, sponsored by SKECHERS, is back to Hong Kong again in this late March.

20 Mar 19
SCNG
Craig Mitchell finished his 75th marathon — this one in Morocco — at the end of January. The Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ran with some of his homeless buddies from the Skid Row Running Club, a group he formed in 2012. Over the years, the judge and selected club members have made similar international trips to run marathons in places like Ghana, Rome, and Vietnam. Those ventures are always special to Craig. But so is this weekend, closer to home. #gallery-1707541-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1707541-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1707541-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1707541-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ “Skid Row Marathon” is a documentary about a group of homeless people in a Los Angeles running group on Skid Row led by criminal court Judge Craig Mitchell, in the foreground, wearing blue gloves. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In the documentary “Skid Row Marathon,” Rafael Cabrera pays a visit to the grave site of a young man he killed in a rival gang shooting decades ago. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In this 2013 photo, a homeless man walks by as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Craig Mitchell, center, talks with Rafael Cabrera, left, after leading a running club for homeless people on a five-mile trek in the streets of downtown Los Angeles. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo/SCNG) Judge Craig Mitchell dresses in his office during the documentary, leaving his running shorts on under his robe, in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon,” a documentary about a group of homeless people in Los Angeles who belong to running group led by Mitchell. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) Judge Craig Mitchell, right, is shown running with a homeless man past tent encampments on the sidewalks of Los Angeles in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon.” The documentary is about a running club for homeless people led by Mitchell, a Los Angeles County criminal court judge.(Courtesy of OWLS Media) The Skid Row runners plan to participate in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon. Their feet will take them miles beyond the route they jog three times a week, when in pre-dawn darkness they move past the street miseries in that gave name to their club. Even better: An award-winning documentary film about the judge and the runners, “Skid Row Marathon,” will make its commercial debut at the Laemmle Playhouse 7 in Pasadena on Friday, March 22, just two days before the big race. The movie runs through March 28. Pasadena is Mitchell’s hometown and the judge will be on hand Friday night and Saturday afternoon to do a Q&A after the movie plays. He’ll be joined by filmmakers Mark and Gabi Hayes and at least one of the original Skid Row runners, Rafael Cabrera, who spent more than half his life in prison for the murder of a rival gang member. The judge feels the same way about the upcoming screening as he did about making the movie. And about forming the club. It’s a matter of changing perspectives and changing lives. “When you talk about homeless people, addicts, felons or ex-felons, it’s often a one-dimensional perception of who they are,” Mitchell says during a call from the downtown courthouse where he presides over criminal trials. “It allows us to minimize their humanity, to discount them and sort of move on.” Meant to inspire “Skid Row Marathon” is all about running, but not running away. The nearly 90-minute film focuses on the effort of five people who have struggled with drink, drugs and delinquency and are trying to recover themselves. The running club and the friendship of Judge Mitchell helps to keep them motivated. “These are people as complicated and multifaceted as anybody else,” says Mitchell, 62, whose life growing up in Pasadena and Irvine, and then as a teacher of poor and at-risk youth in Los Angeles County, a prosecutor, and a jurist brings its own fascination. “They can not be defined by this one facet of their lives.” The film has been a hit at festivals since its initial release in 2017, garnering such honors as the audience awards for best documentary at both the LA Film Festival and the Palm Springs International Film Festival. Director Mark Hayes and production company OWLS Media have also received jury awards at several film festivals. No less than famed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore praised “Skid Row Marathon” when it played at his Traverse City Film Festival in Michigan last year. Moore has described the movie as “powerful” and “brilliant.” “It really speaks to that old cliche you’ve heard your whole life of how one person can make a difference,” Moore said at the time. But he adds, it’s not just the judge making a difference, but also the participants in the running club “and how they then inspire others.” To Mitchell, inspiration is the entire point of the running club and his reason for wanting to do the film. “If we would figure out how many hours a week each one of us could devote to some enterprise to address the needs of the larger community, I think we could transform communities.” Mitchell, a married father of three, just wishes “Skid Row Marathon” could enjoy a broader commercial release. He’s convinced it’s as good, if not better, than what he scrolls through on Netflix or buys tickets for at the movies. “It’s the story of people who are homeless, people who are in recovery, people who are out of prison. That’s a story that needs to be told.” Besides showing the documentary at film festivals, director Mark Hayes and producer Gabi Hayes, husband and wife, have been invited to communities around the country to screen “Skid Row Marathon” for nonprofit organizations and other groups. Most recently, Gabi Hayes said she’s taken the film to Austin, Texas, and Dubuque, Iowa. In the fall, she’ll be traveling to Boise, Idaho. Often, someone in the audience wants to start a running club for people at local homeless shelters. Several such clubs have formed. The film-making couple, who live in Studio City, were inspired themselves by a newspaper article about Judge Mitchell and the running club that was published around the time of the L.A. marathon in 2013. For more than a month before they did any filming, both simply ran with the club — without cameras in hand — to earn trust. “I’m a runner. Mark went reluctantly, but he did it,” said Gabi Hayes, who continues as part of the club and will participate with them in the L.A. marathon on Sunday. “They didn’t want to open up at the beginning. But we were showing up all the time.” It took more than four years from start to finish to follow the stories. Some of the runners, Hayes said, would relapse and, after that, “you could never find them.” Second chances Someone who has been running with Judge Mitchell since the club started is Rafael Cabrera. The two met when Mitchell, then a prosecutor in Los Angeles, attended a 2004 parole board hearing for Cabrera’s release from a 36-years-to-life sentence. In studying Cabrera’s background and his life since incarceration, Mitchell found him to be a different person, a better man. But it would take several hearings before Cabrera, behind bars for more than 28 years, earned his freedom. While in prison, he and Mitchell developed a friendship through correspondence. Cabrera, released to a halfway house in 2011, then began running with Mitchell. Cabrera, 54, is shown in the film on his journey to redeem himself — helping the incarcerated, seeking forgiveness from the family of the young man he shot dead, counseling boys and girls not to fall prey to the street. He now works for the city in cultural affairs, focusing on programs for children and parents. He also volunteers with senior citizens. Cabrera sees “Skid Row Marathon” as a movie about second chances. It’s a theme of his life: “I think I’m helping somebody else and they are really helping me.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Cabrera plans to join Mitchell, along with Gabi and Mark Hayes, at Playhouse 7 Movie Theater for Q&A sessions following the 7:50 p.m. showing of “Skid Row Marathon” on Friday, March 22, and the 3:15 p.m. showing on Saturday, March 23. The theater is at 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. On Sunday, the runners will rise at 5 a.m. to be with Mitchell at the starting line for his next marathon, 26 miles from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica. “I say to the judge, ‘I will run, I will crawl, I will do whatever,'” Cabrera said, “‘but I will finish.'” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
20 Mar 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Craig Mitchell finished his 75th marathon — this one in Morocco — at the end of January. The Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ran with some of his homeless buddies from the Skid Row Running Club, a group he formed in 2012. Over the years, the judge and selected club members have made similar international trips to run marathons in places like Ghana, Rome, and Vietnam. Those ventures are always special to Craig. But so is this weekend, closer to home. #gallery-1890143-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1890143-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1890143-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1890143-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ “Skid Row Marathon” is a documentary about a group of homeless people in a Los Angeles running group on Skid Row led by criminal court Judge Craig Mitchell, in the foreground, wearing blue gloves. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In the documentary “Skid Row Marathon,” Rafael Cabrera pays a visit to the grave site of a young man he killed in a rival gang shooting decades ago. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In this 2013 photo, a homeless man walks by as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Craig Mitchell, center, talks with Rafael Cabrera, left, after leading a running club for homeless people on a five-mile trek in the streets of downtown Los Angeles. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo/SCNG) Judge Craig Mitchell dresses in his office during the documentary, leaving his running shorts on under his robe, in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon,” a documentary about a group of homeless people in Los Angeles who belong to running group led by Mitchell. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) Judge Craig Mitchell, right, is shown running with a homeless man past tent encampments on the sidewalks of Los Angeles in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon.” The documentary is about a running club for homeless people led by Mitchell, a Los Angeles County criminal court judge.(Courtesy of OWLS Media) The Skid Row runners plan to participate in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon. Their feet will take them miles beyond the route they jog three times a week, when in pre-dawn darkness they move past the street miseries in that gave name to their club. Even better: An award-winning documentary film about the judge and the runners, “Skid Row Marathon,” will make its commercial debut at the Laemmle Playhouse 7 in Pasadena on Friday, March 22, just two days before the big race. The movie runs through March 28. Pasadena is Mitchell’s hometown and the judge will be on hand Friday night and Saturday afternoon to do a Q&A after the movie plays. He’ll be joined by filmmakers Mark and Gabi Hayes and at least one of the original Skid Row runners, Rafael Cabrera, who spent more than half his life in prison for the murder of a rival gang member. The judge feels the same way about the upcoming screening as he did about making the movie. And about forming the club. It’s a matter of changing perspectives and changing lives. “When you talk about homeless people, addicts, felons or ex-felons, it’s often a one-dimensional perception of who they are,” Mitchell says during a call from the downtown courthouse where he presides over criminal trials. “It allows us to minimize their humanity, to discount them and sort of move on.” Meant to inspire “Skid Row Marathon” is all about running, but not running away. The nearly 90-minute film focuses on the effort of five people who have struggled with drink, drugs and delinquency and are trying to recover themselves. The running club and the friendship of Judge Mitchell helps to keep them motivated. “These are people as complicated and multifaceted as anybody else,” says Mitchell, 62, whose life growing up in Pasadena and Irvine, and then as a teacher of poor and at-risk youth in Los Angeles County, a prosecutor, and a jurist brings its own fascination. “They can not be defined by this one facet of their lives.” The film has been a hit at festivals since its initial release in 2017, garnering such honors as the audience awards for best documentary at both the LA Film Festival and the Palm Springs International Film Festival. Director Mark Hayes and production company OWLS Media have also received jury awards at several film festivals. No less than famed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore praised “Skid Row Marathon” when it played at his Traverse City Film Festival in Michigan last year. Moore has described the movie as “powerful” and “brilliant.” “It really speaks to that old cliche you’ve heard your whole life of how one person can make a difference,” Moore said at the time. But he adds, it’s not just the judge making a difference, but also the participants in the running club “and how they then inspire others.” To Mitchell, inspiration is the entire point of the running club and his reason for wanting to do the film. “If we would figure out how many hours a week each one of us could devote to some enterprise to address the needs of the larger community, I think we could transform communities.” Mitchell, a married father of three, just wishes “Skid Row Marathon” could enjoy a broader commercial release. He’s convinced it’s as good, if not better, than what he scrolls through on Netflix or buys tickets for at the movies. “It’s the story of people who are homeless, people who are in recovery, people who are out of prison. That’s a story that needs to be told.” Besides showing the documentary at film festivals, director Mark Hayes and producer Gabi Hayes, husband and wife, have been invited to communities around the country to screen “Skid Row Marathon” for nonprofit organizations and other groups. Most recently, Gabi Hayes said she’s taken the film to Austin, Texas, and Dubuque, Iowa. In the fall, she’ll be traveling to Boise, Idaho. Often, someone in the audience wants to start a running club for people at local homeless shelters. Several such clubs have formed. The film-making couple, who live in Studio City, were inspired themselves by a newspaper article about Judge Mitchell and the running club that was published around the time of the L.A. marathon in 2013. For more than a month before they did any filming, both simply ran with the club — without cameras in hand — to earn trust. “I’m a runner. Mark went reluctantly, but he did it,” said Gabi Hayes, who continues as part of the club and will participate with them in the L.A. marathon on Sunday. “They didn’t want to open up at the beginning. But we were showing up all the time.” It took more than four years from start to finish to follow the stories. Some of the runners, Hayes said, would relapse and, after that, “you could never find them.” Second chances Someone who has been running with Judge Mitchell since the club started is Rafael Cabrera. The two met when Mitchell, then a prosecutor in Los Angeles, attended a 2004 parole board hearing for Cabrera’s release from a 36-years-to-life sentence. In studying Cabrera’s background and his life since incarceration, Mitchell found him to be a different person, a better man. But it would take several hearings before Cabrera, behind bars for more than 28 years, earned his freedom. While in prison, he and Mitchell developed a friendship through correspondence. Cabrera, released to a halfway house in 2011, then began running with Mitchell. Cabrera, 54, is shown in the film on his journey to redeem himself — helping the incarcerated, seeking forgiveness from the family of the young man he shot dead, counseling boys and girls not to fall prey to the street. He now works for the city in cultural affairs, focusing on programs for children and parents. He also volunteers with senior citizens. Cabrera sees “Skid Row Marathon” as a movie about second chances. It’s a theme of his life: “I think I’m helping somebody else and they are really helping me.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Cabrera plans to join Mitchell, along with Gabi and Mark Hayes, at Playhouse 7 Movie Theater for Q&A sessions following the 7:50 p.m. showing of “Skid Row Marathon” on Friday, March 22, and the 3:15 p.m. showing on Saturday, March 23. The theater is at 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. On Sunday, the runners will rise at 5 a.m. to be with Mitchell at the starting line for his next marathon, 26 miles from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica. “I say to the judge, ‘I will run, I will crawl, I will do whatever,’” Cabrera said, “‘but I will finish.’” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
20 Mar 19
Daily Breeze
Craig Mitchell finished his 75th marathon — this one in Morocco — at the end of January. The Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ran with some of his homeless buddies from the Skid Row Running Club, a group he formed in 2012. Over the years, the judge and selected club members have made similar international trips to run marathons in places like Ghana, Rome, and Vietnam. Those ventures are always special to Craig. But so is this weekend, closer to home. #gallery-1755131-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1755131-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1755131-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1755131-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ “Skid Row Marathon” is a documentary about a group of homeless people in a Los Angeles running group on Skid Row led by criminal court Judge Craig Mitchell, in the foreground, wearing blue gloves. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In the documentary “Skid Row Marathon,” Rafael Cabrera pays a visit to the grave site of a young man he killed in a rival gang shooting decades ago. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In this 2013 photo, a homeless man walks by as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Craig Mitchell, center, talks with Rafael Cabrera, left, after leading a running club for homeless people on a five-mile trek in the streets of downtown Los Angeles. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo/SCNG) Judge Craig Mitchell dresses in his office during the documentary, leaving his running shorts on under his robe, in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon,” a documentary about a group of homeless people in Los Angeles who belong to running group led by Mitchell. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) Judge Craig Mitchell, right, is shown running with a homeless man past tent encampments on the sidewalks of Los Angeles in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon.” The documentary is about a running club for homeless people led by Mitchell, a Los Angeles County criminal court judge.(Courtesy of OWLS Media) The Skid Row runners plan to participate in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon. Their feet will take them miles beyond the route they jog three times a week, when in pre-dawn darkness they move past the street miseries in that gave name to their club. Even better: An award-winning documentary film about the judge and the runners, “Skid Row Marathon,” will make its commercial debut at the Laemmle Playhouse 7 in Pasadena on Friday, March 22, just two days before the big race. The movie runs through March 28. Pasadena is Mitchell’s hometown and the judge will be on hand Friday night and Saturday afternoon to do a Q&A after the movie plays. He’ll be joined by filmmakers Mark and Gabi Hayes and at least one of the original Skid Row runners, Rafael Cabrera, who spent more than half his life in prison for the murder of a rival gang member. The judge feels the same way about the upcoming screening as he did about making the movie. And about forming the club. It’s a matter of changing perspectives and changing lives. “When you talk about homeless people, addicts, felons or ex-felons, it’s often a one-dimensional perception of who they are,” Mitchell says during a call from the downtown courthouse where he presides over criminal trials. “It allows us to minimize their humanity, to discount them and sort of move on.” Meant to inspire “Skid Row Marathon” is all about running, but not running away. The nearly 90-minute film focuses on the effort of five people who have struggled with drink, drugs and delinquency and are trying to recover themselves. The running club and the friendship of Judge Mitchell helps to keep them motivated. “These are people as complicated and multifaceted as anybody else,” says Mitchell, 62, whose life growing up in Pasadena and Irvine, and then as a teacher of poor and at-risk youth in Los Angeles County, a prosecutor, and a jurist brings its own fascination. “They can not be defined by this one facet of their lives.” The film has been a hit at festivals since its initial release in 2017, garnering such honors as the audience awards for best documentary at both the LA Film Festival and the Palm Springs International Film Festival. Director Mark Hayes and production company OWLS Media have also received jury awards at several film festivals. No less than famed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore praised “Skid Row Marathon” when it played at his Traverse City Film Festival in Michigan last year. Moore has described the movie as “powerful” and “brilliant.” “It really speaks to that old cliche you’ve heard your whole life of how one person can make a difference,” Moore said at the time. But he adds, it’s not just the judge making a difference, but also the participants in the running club “and how they then inspire others.” To Mitchell, inspiration is the entire point of the running club and his reason for wanting to do the film. “If we would figure out how many hours a week each one of us could devote to some enterprise to address the needs of the larger community, I think we could transform communities.” Mitchell, a married father of three, just wishes “Skid Row Marathon” could enjoy a broader commercial release. He’s convinced it’s as good, if not better, than what he scrolls through on Netflix or buys tickets for at the movies. “It’s the story of people who are homeless, people who are in recovery, people who are out of prison. That’s a story that needs to be told.” Besides showing the documentary at film festivals, director Mark Hayes and producer Gabi Hayes, husband and wife, have been invited to communities around the country to screen “Skid Row Marathon” for nonprofit organizations and other groups. Most recently, Gabi Hayes said she’s taken the film to Austin, Texas, and Dubuque, Iowa. In the fall, she’ll be traveling to Boise, Idaho. Often, someone in the audience wants to start a running club for people at local homeless shelters. Several such clubs have formed. The film-making couple, who live in Studio City, were inspired themselves by a newspaper article about Judge Mitchell and the running club that was published around the time of the L.A. marathon in 2013. For more than a month before they did any filming, both simply ran with the club — without cameras in hand — to earn trust. “I’m a runner. Mark went reluctantly, but he did it,” said Gabi Hayes, who continues as part of the club and will participate with them in the L.A. marathon on Sunday. “They didn’t want to open up at the beginning. But we were showing up all the time.” It took more than four years from start to finish to follow the stories. Some of the runners, Hayes said, would relapse and, after that, “you could never find them.” Second chances Someone who has been running with Judge Mitchell since the club started is Rafael Cabrera. The two met when Mitchell, then a prosecutor in Los Angeles, attended a 2004 parole board hearing for Cabrera’s release from a 36-years-to-life sentence. In studying Cabrera’s background and his life since incarceration, Mitchell found him to be a different person, a better man. But it would take several hearings before Cabrera, behind bars for more than 28 years, earned his freedom. While in prison, he and Mitchell developed a friendship through correspondence. Cabrera, released to a halfway house in 2011, then began running with Mitchell. Cabrera, 54, is shown in the film on his journey to redeem himself — helping the incarcerated, seeking forgiveness from the family of the young man he shot dead, counseling boys and girls not to fall prey to the street. He now works for the city in cultural affairs, focusing on programs for children and parents. He also volunteers with senior citizens. Cabrera sees “Skid Row Marathon” as a movie about second chances. It’s a theme of his life: “I think I’m helping somebody else and they are really helping me.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Cabrera plans to join Mitchell, along with Gabi and Mark Hayes, at Playhouse 7 Movie Theater for Q&A sessions following the 7:50 p.m. showing of “Skid Row Marathon” on Friday, March 22, and the 3:15 p.m. showing on Saturday, March 23. The theater is at 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. On Sunday, the runners will rise at 5 a.m. to be with Mitchell at the starting line for his next marathon, 26 miles from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica. “I say to the judge, ‘I will run, I will crawl, I will do whatever,’” Cabrera said, “‘but I will finish.’” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
20 Mar 19
Journey Thru Life Changes

So you made the NYR {again for the 6th year in a row} to lose weight. You are going to actually go to the gym this year….never mind that its now March and you have YET to set foot into that gym you signed up for online. Unless you are like me and you have […]

20 Mar 19
100Running

Members of the Manhattan Beach-based Skechers running team will take part in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday. Every Thursday evening, the South Bay Running Club starts its training runs at the downtown Manhattan Beach Skechers store. South Bay Running Club’s sponsor Skechers is also the title sponsor of the Skechers Performance Los […]

19 Mar 19
Us Weekly
When it comes to keeping it real, Jessie James Decker is queen. The mom-of-three and country superstar doesn’t just do it all. She documents it for all to see! Whether it’s highlighting her most recent vacation getaway with her hubby, former NFL star Eric Decker, or whipping up a batch of her fan-favorite famous chocolate chip cookies, Decker’s Instagram is the ultimate destination for serious inspiration. [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.usmagazine.com/shop-with-us/news/walmart-new-joy-razor-line-brand-shaving-reviews/” title=”Shop With Us: We Tried Walmart’s New Joy Razor Line and Now Shaving Isn’t So Bad After All” target=”” inset=”true”] So while we may learn a thing or two about baking or awesome travel destinations, we can also get some fashion inspiration, too! The singer proved that this old school sneaker is still fresh since she’s been wearing it a ton lately! See it: Grab the Skechers Sport Women’s D’Lites Slip-On Mule Sneaker with prices starting at $33, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 19th, 2019, but are subject to change. Don’t call it a comeback, this sneaker has already been here. But let’s make no mistake, thanks to JJD’s stamp of approval, this Skechers sneaker is here to stay. The Skechers Sport Women’s D’Lites Slip-On Mule Sneaker is the fan-favorite option that has taken Amazon by storm. With nearly 2,700 reviewers singing its praises, it’s safe to say this sneaker is nothing short of a cult classic. And since we’re already on the subject of classics, this sneaker’s classic slip-on design is the ideal option when looking for a subtle but sophisticated style. The lightweight 100% smooth leather and synthetic silhouette features a rubber sole and platform heel. The air-cooled memory foam insole inside doesn’t just make this option cool, but actually makes it cool, working overtime to keep this sneaker light and breezy. Call it the ultimate two-in-one option. Thanks to the sneaker-mule combination, it’s the most wearable business in the front, party in the back option in footwear. That’s right, it’s a true two-for-one. The front section of the shoe very much resembles a traditional sneaker. Think bulky-toe areas, laces and endless support. But this option offers an exposed open-back, mule-like silhouette in the back. It’s equal parts sleek and sophisticated as well as comfortable and chic. It’s no wonder why so many reviewers couldn’t help but jump on the bandwagon. With nearly 2,700 fans, shoppers loved the cushion, comfort and chic elements this sneaker had to offer. Go ahead and call it the perfect trifecta. One reviewer even went ahead and boldly said this Skechers slip-on sneaker offered a slipper-like component. Strange enough, we agree! The memory foam insole is the perfect footbed. This sneaker is obviously the best choice for on-the-go! See it: Grab the Skechers Sport Women’s D’Lites Slip-On Mule Sneaker with prices starting at $33, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 19th, 2019, but are subject to change. In fact, it’s a no-brainer why Decker is such an avid supporter of this fresh kick. As not only a mom-on-the-go but a superstar-on-the-go, a comfortable shoe that serves support and style is essential. The proof is in the photo as to why the Eric & Jessie: Game On star keeps her game on point in this slick sneaker. As seen in her March 9 post on Instagram, the singer’s entire look remains fresher than fresh in this style. (P.S. We also spotted Decker in her favorite kicks in this February Instagram post, too!) It’s so chic, we can’t help but want to mimic JJD’s effortless ensemble, too! Start off styling this look by sliding into these slides along with a pair of equally stylish trouser pants. A bold color or bright print will catch attention, just like Decker did! That’s why we second the leopard-print motion JJD is championing with a matching leopard print bag and hat! Keep the look balanced by reaching for a solid long or short sleeve T-shirt. If too much animal print, opt for just one printed piece and keep the rest of the look solid and simple! This fresh kick will easily transition from cooler to warmer weather just as seamlessly. In fact, with a total resurgence of all things ’90s on the up-and-up, we can’t think of a shoe more ’90s than Skechers. This slip-on is also perfect when paired with all of those supershort minidresses, midi-dresses and even those flared, cropped bottom jeans. Thanks to Mrs. Decker, this sneaker-mule option is the seriously stylish sneaker mule that will not only kick up our style but get Us extra points for its “wow” factor. See it: Grab the Skechers Sport Women’s D’Lites Slip-On Mule Sneaker with prices starting at $33, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 19th, 2019, but are subject to change. Not your style? Check out additional sneaker options also available at Amazon here!  Check out more of our picks and deals here! This post is brought to you by Us Weekly’s Shop With Us team. The Shop With Us team aims to highlight products and services our readers might find interesting and useful. Product and service selection, however, is in no way intended to constitute an endorsement by either Us Weekly or of any celebrity mentioned in the post. The Shop With Us team may receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. In addition, Us Weekly receives compensation from the manufacturer of the products we write about when you click on a link and then purchase the product featured in an article. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product or service is featured or recommended. Shop With Us operates independently from advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback at ShopWithUs@usmagazine.com. Happy shopping!
20 Mar 19
Press Enterprise
Craig Mitchell finished his 75th marathon — this one in Morocco — at the end of January. The Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ran with some of his homeless buddies from the Skid Row Running Club, a group he formed in 2012. Over the years, the judge and selected club members have made similar international trips to run marathons in places like Ghana, Rome, and Vietnam. Those ventures are always special to Craig. But so is this weekend, closer to home. #gallery-1427387-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1427387-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1427387-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1427387-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ “Skid Row Marathon” is a documentary about a group of homeless people in a Los Angeles running group on Skid Row led by criminal court Judge Craig Mitchell, in the foreground, wearing blue gloves. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In the documentary “Skid Row Marathon,” Rafael Cabrera pays a visit to the grave site of a young man he killed in a rival gang shooting decades ago. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) In this 2013 photo, a homeless man walks by as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Craig Mitchell, center, talks with Rafael Cabrera, left, after leading a running club for homeless people on a five-mile trek in the streets of downtown Los Angeles. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo/SCNG) Judge Craig Mitchell dresses in his office during the documentary, leaving his running shorts on under his robe, in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon,” a documentary about a group of homeless people in Los Angeles who belong to running group led by Mitchell. (Courtesy of OWLS Media) Judge Craig Mitchell, right, is shown running with a homeless man past tent encampments on the sidewalks of Los Angeles in this scene from “Skid Row Marathon.” The documentary is about a running club for homeless people led by Mitchell, a Los Angeles County criminal court judge.(Courtesy of OWLS Media) The Skid Row runners plan to participate in the Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon. Their feet will take them miles beyond the route they jog three times a week, when in pre-dawn darkness they move past the street miseries in that gave name to their club. Even better: An award-winning documentary film about the judge and the runners, “Skid Row Marathon,” will make its commercial debut at the Laemmle Playhouse 7 in Pasadena on Friday, March 22, just two days before the big race. The movie runs through March 28. Pasadena is Mitchell’s hometown and the judge will be on hand Friday night and Saturday afternoon to do a Q&A after the movie plays. He’ll be joined by filmmakers Mark and Gabi Hayes and at least one of the original Skid Row runners, Rafael Cabrera, who spent more than half his life in prison for the murder of a rival gang member. The judge feels the same way about the upcoming screening as he did about making the movie. And about forming the club. It’s a matter of changing perspectives and changing lives. “When you talk about homeless people, addicts, felons or ex-felons, it’s often a one-dimensional perception of who they are,” Mitchell says during a call from the downtown courthouse where he presides over criminal trials. “It allows us to minimize their humanity, to discount them and sort of move on.” Meant to inspire “Skid Row Marathon” is all about running, but not running away. The nearly 90-minute film focuses on the effort of five people who have struggled with drink, drugs and delinquency and are trying to recover themselves. The running club and the friendship of Judge Mitchell helps to keep them motivated. “These are people as complicated and multifaceted as anybody else,” says Mitchell, 62, whose life growing up in Pasadena and Irvine, and then as a teacher of poor and at-risk youth in Los Angeles County, a prosecutor, and a jurist brings its own fascination. “They can not be defined by this one facet of their lives.” The film has been a hit at festivals since its initial release in 2017, garnering such honors as the audience awards for best documentary at both the LA Film Festival and the Palm Springs International Film Festival. Director Mark Hayes and production company OWLS Media have also received jury awards at several film festivals. No less than famed documentary filmmaker Michael Moore praised “Skid Row Marathon” when it played at his Traverse City Film Festival in Michigan last year. Moore has described the movie as “powerful” and “brilliant.” “It really speaks to that old cliche you’ve heard your whole life of how one person can make a difference,” Moore said at the time. But he adds, it’s not just the judge making a difference, but also the participants in the running club “and how they then inspire others.” To Mitchell, inspiration is the entire point of the running club and his reason for wanting to do the film. “If we would figure out how many hours a week each one of us could devote to some enterprise to address the needs of the larger community, I think we could transform communities.” Mitchell, a married father of three, just wishes “Skid Row Marathon” could enjoy a broader commercial release. He’s convinced it’s as good, if not better, than what he scrolls through on Netflix or buys tickets for at the movies. “It’s the story of people who are homeless, people who are in recovery, people who are out of prison. That’s a story that needs to be told.” Besides showing the documentary at film festivals, director Mark Hayes and producer Gabi Hayes, husband and wife, have been invited to communities around the country to screen “Skid Row Marathon” for nonprofit organizations and other groups. Most recently, Gabi Hayes said she’s taken the film to Austin, Texas, and Dubuque, Iowa. In the fall, she’ll be traveling to Boise, Idaho. Often, someone in the audience wants to start a running club for people at local homeless shelters. Several such clubs have formed. The film-making couple, who live in Studio City, were inspired themselves by a newspaper article about Judge Mitchell and the running club that was published around the time of the L.A. marathon in 2013. For more than a month before they did any filming, both simply ran with the club — without cameras in hand — to earn trust. “I’m a runner. Mark went reluctantly, but he did it,” said Gabi Hayes, who continues as part of the club and will participate with them in the L.A. marathon on Sunday. “They didn’t want to open up at the beginning. But we were showing up all the time.” It took more than four years from start to finish to follow the stories. Some of the runners, Hayes said, would relapse and, after that, “you could never find them.” Second chances Someone who has been running with Judge Mitchell since the club started is Rafael Cabrera. The two met when Mitchell, then a prosecutor in Los Angeles, attended a 2004 parole board hearing for Cabrera’s release from a 36-years-to-life sentence. In studying Cabrera’s background and his life since incarceration, Mitchell found him to be a different person, a better man. But it would take several hearings before Cabrera, behind bars for more than 28 years, earned his freedom. While in prison, he and Mitchell developed a friendship through correspondence. Cabrera, released to a halfway house in 2011, then began running with Mitchell. Cabrera, 54, is shown in the film on his journey to redeem himself — helping the incarcerated, seeking forgiveness from the family of the young man he shot dead, counseling boys and girls not to fall prey to the street. He now works for the city in cultural affairs, focusing on programs for children and parents. He also volunteers with senior citizens. Cabrera sees “Skid Row Marathon” as a movie about second chances. It’s a theme of his life: “I think I’m helping somebody else and they are really helping me.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Cabrera plans to join Mitchell, along with Gabi and Mark Hayes, at Playhouse 7 Movie Theater for Q&A sessions following the 7:50 p.m. showing of “Skid Row Marathon” on Friday, March 22, and the 3:15 p.m. showing on Saturday, March 23. The theater is at 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. On Sunday, the runners will rise at 5 a.m. to be with Mitchell at the starting line for his next marathon, 26 miles from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica. “I say to the judge, ‘I will run, I will crawl, I will do whatever,’” Cabrera said, “‘but I will finish.’” Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.