Skiing

15 Feb 19
Chill minecraft

“This is why we do this.” When I heard Jennifer’s story, I knew I had to share it. She’s a member of the Nerd Fitness community who for years struggled with things most of us can relate to: Seeking comfort in sugary foods and alcohol. A lack of energy and all around feeling of fatigue. […]

15 Feb 19
openfieldofdreams

I have fallen prey to a virus invading my body.  Fever and severe muscles soreness are signs of the natural defence of the body fighting a war for the healthy equilibrium it wants to maintain.  The muscle pains became so intense I woke up with chest pain radiating into my jaw and left wrist provoked […]

15 Feb 19
Fitness Tips By James

“This is why we do this.” When I heard Jennifer’s story, I knew I had to share it. She’s a member of the Nerd Fitness community who for years struggled with things most of us can relate to: Seeking comfort in sugary foods and alcohol. A lack of energy and all around feeling of fatigue. […]

15 Feb 19
Ski trip 2019

After a late breakfast we headed up the mountain and got our ski gear. The pupils had an afternoon on the slopes with the instructors and some picked it up very well! We are all sleepy but we have bowling to look forward to now! 🎳 🎳

15 Feb 19
Highlining

Are you afraid of heights? If your answer is “yes”, then this sport is not for you!  Considered as one of the most dangerous sports, highlining consists on a person keeping balance on a rope, which is suspended between 2 points (these points are usually mountains) and where the goal is to go from one […]

15 Feb 19
The Mercury News
The dead lawns and depleted reservoirs that marked California’s historic five-year drought seemed a long way off Friday, as a week of wet weather — with a little more to come Saturday — sent rainfall totals across Northern California above 100 percent of their historical averages. Total rainfall since Oct. 1 was at 109 percent of normal for San Jose; 111 percent for San Francisco and Sacramento; and 102 percent in Oakland. Further south, the numbers were even further off the charts, with Los Angeles at 170 percent of normal and San Diego at 166 percent. “Just being above normal makes people feel there’s not a drought going on,” said Will Pi, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Monterey. “Until this week we were below that. We’ve had a lot of rainy days this winter, but this was the first storm that really dumped a lot of rain.” As of Tuesday Feb. 12, only 10 percent of California was considered to be in a drought (light orange means modest drought and darker means more serious), a stark improvement from Jan. 1, 2019 when 75 percent of the state fell into that category. On Friday, the Bay Area cleaned up from the atmospheric river storm that brought a drenching 7 inches in 72 hours over the Santa Cruz Mountains, North Bay Hills and Big Sur area. The storm, the strongest of the year so far, also delivered 2 to 4 inches to most Bay Area cities, swelling creeks but stopping just in time to avoid flooding in most places other than in Guerneville, where the Russian River peaked at 4 feet above flood stage early Friday morning, causing some flooding in low-lying areas. “Overall, it has been a great benefit,” said Pi. “Everything is green. No fire danger. And it washes the air pollution away.” Saturday should see cooler temperatures, Pi said, with lows in the 40s in most Bay Area communities, highs in the 50s and scattered showers giving way to sunny weather Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. A high surf advisory is in place this weekend at the coast, where rip currents and waves up to 25 feet are expected. A cold front from the north is forecast to take snow levels down to 3,000 feet on Saturday, which should bring snow to the higher Bay Area peaks, including Mount Hamilton and Mount Diablo. The snow level is expected to fall further to 1,500 feet by Sunday, which should bring snow to the Santa Cruz Mountains, East Bay Hills and Mount Tamalpais. The extent of the deluge, and other storms in recent weeks, could be seen all across Northern California. Near Los Gatos, Lexington Reservoir filled to the top and began spilling down the spillway Friday morning for the first time in two years since the big drought-busting winter of 2017. “It started spilling around 9 am,” said Colleen Valles, a spokeswoman for the Santa Clara Valley Water District. “It’s a modest amount. We aren’t expecting any impacts downstream.” Meanwhile,  the U.S. Drought Monitor, a weekly report issued by the federal government and the University of Nebraska, on Thursday reported that just 10 percent of California’s land area is in any kind of drought condition, even a modest one. By comparison, just over six weeks ago on Jan. 1, roughly 75 percent of the state was in some sort of unusually dry pattern, which was leading to fears that the state might be heading back into another serious dry spell like the 2012-2016 drought, the worst since California became a state in 1850. Those fears have been washed away, however. The Sierra Nevada snowpack — the source of nearly one-third of the state’s water supply, hit 141 percent of the historical average on Friday, up from just 69 percent on New Year’s Day. A winter storm warning remains in effect through Saturday night, with avalanche warnings, chain controls on Interstate 80 and Highway 50, and another 1 to 3 feet of snow expected. Conditions were so bad that authorities were recommending people not travel to the Sierra on Friday, the beginning of President’s Day Weekend, typically a big skiing period. “If you must travel,” the National Weather Service said in an advisory, “prepare for long delays and carry an emergency kit with extra food, water and clothing.” Meanwhile, across the Bay Area, reservoirs that had been perilously low during the drought filled to the top. All seven of the reservoirs owned by the Marin Municipal Water District were spilling. Los Vaqueros, the massive man-made lake in Contra Costa County, was 92 percent full. Loch Lomond Reservoir near Ben Lomond, a key part of Santa Cruz’s water supply, was spilling. The seven reservoirs owned by the East Bay Municipal Utility District were 83 percent full. And four of the 10 reservoirs owned by the Santa Clara Valley Water District — Lexington, Uvas, Chesbro and Almaden — were spilling. Collectively, all 10 were 63 percent full, putting them at 113 percent of the historic average for this date. To reduce flood risk, the district last week began increased water releases from half of them, most notably Anderson, the largest, which was 41 percent full on Friday afternoon. “Normally we like the rain to come in fits — a little bit at a time, and have things dry out, so we can get the rain without the threat of flooding,” said Valles. “Give us a break so we can get ready for more. That’s what we’ve been seeing over the past month.”  
15 Feb 19
East Bay Times
The dead lawns and depleted reservoirs that marked California’s historic five-year drought seemed a long way off Friday, as a week of wet weather — with a little more to come Saturday — sent rainfall totals across Northern California above 100 percent of their historical averages. Total rainfall since Oct. 1 was at 109 percent of normal for San Jose; 111 percent for San Francisco and Sacramento; and 102 percent in Oakland. Further south, the numbers were even further off the charts, with Los Angeles at 170 percent of normal and San Diego at 166 percent. “Just being above normal makes people feel there’s not a drought going on,” said Will Pi, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Monterey. “Until this week we were below that. We’ve had a lot of rainy days this winter, but this was the first storm that really dumped a lot of rain.” As of Tuesday Feb. 12, only 10 percent of California was considered to be in a drought (light orange means modest drought and darker means more serious), a stark improvement from Jan. 1, 2019 when 75 percent of the state fell into that category. On Friday, the Bay Area cleaned up from the atmospheric river storm that brought a drenching 7 inches in 72 hours over the Santa Cruz Mountains, North Bay Hills and Big Sur area. The storm, the strongest of the year so far, also delivered 2 to 4 inches to most Bay Area cities, swelling creeks but stopping just in time to avoid flooding in most places other than in Guerneville, where the Russian River peaked at 4 feet above flood stage early Friday morning, causing some flooding in low-lying areas. “Overall, it has been a great benefit,” said Pi. “Everything is green. No fire danger. And it washes the air pollution away.” Saturday should see cooler temperatures, Pi said, with lows in the 40s in most Bay Area communities, highs in the 50s and scattered showers giving way to sunny weather Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. A high surf advisory is in place this weekend at the coast, where rip currents and waves up to 25 feet are expected. A cold front from the north is forecast to take snow levels down to 3,000 feet on Saturday, which should bring snow to the higher Bay Area peaks, including Mount Hamilton and Mount Diablo. The snow level is expected to fall further to 1,500 feet by Sunday, which should bring snow to the Santa Cruz Mountains, East Bay Hills and Mount Tamalpais. The extent of the deluge, and other storms in recent weeks, could be seen all across Northern California. Near Los Gatos, Lexington Reservoir filled to the top and began spilling down the spillway Friday morning for the first time in two years since the big drought-busting winter of 2017. “It started spilling around 9 am,” said Colleen Valles, a spokeswoman for the Santa Clara Valley Water District. “It’s a modest amount. We aren’t expecting any impacts downstream.” Meanwhile,  the U.S. Drought Monitor, a weekly report issued by the federal government and the University of Nebraska, on Thursday reported that just 10 percent of California’s land area is in any kind of drought condition, even a modest one. By comparison, just over six weeks ago on Jan. 1, roughly 75 percent of the state was in some sort of unusually dry pattern, which was leading to fears that the state might be heading back into another serious dry spell like the 2012-2016 drought, the worst since California became a state in 1850. Those fears have been washed away, however. The Sierra Nevada snowpack — the source of nearly one-third of the state’s water supply, hit 141 percent of the historical average on Friday, up from just 69 percent on New Year’s Day. A winter storm warning remains in effect through Saturday night, with avalanche warnings, chain controls on Interstate 80 and Highway 50, and another 1 to 3 feet of snow expected. Conditions were so bad that authorities were recommending people not travel to the Sierra on Friday, the beginning of President’s Day Weekend, typically a big skiing period. “If you must travel,” the National Weather Service said in an advisory, “prepare for long delays and carry an emergency kit with extra food, water and clothing.” Meanwhile, across the Bay Area, reservoirs that had been perilously low during the drought filled to the top. All seven of the reservoirs owned by the Marin Municipal Water District were spilling. Los Vaqueros, the massive man-made lake in Contra Costa County, was 92 percent full. Loch Lomond Reservoir near Ben Lomond, a key part of Santa Cruz’s water supply, was spilling. The seven reservoirs owned by the East Bay Municipal Utility District were 83 percent full. And four of the 10 reservoirs owned by the Santa Clara Valley Water District — Lexington, Uvas, Chesbro and Almaden — were spilling. Collectively, all 10 were 63 percent full, putting them at 113 percent of the historic average for this date. To reduce flood risk, the district last week began increased water releases from half of them, most notably Anderson, the largest, which was 41 percent full on Friday afternoon. “Normally we like the rain to come in fits — a little bit at a time, and have things dry out, so we can get the rain without the threat of flooding,” said Valles. “Give us a break so we can get ready for more. That’s what we’ve been seeing over the past month.”  
15 Feb 19
Lockley’s Blog

California is known as the golden state. It has been a state of ever developing artist and musicians and leader in different forms. It is known for its extremely various geography ranging from mountain ranges to coastal regions to deserts. It is also popular for people who want to chase after their dreams, mostly in […]

15 Feb 19
Health Avenue

“This is why we do this.” When I heard Jennifer’s story, I knew I had to share it. She’s a member of the Nerd Fitness community who for years struggled with things most of us can relate to: Seeking comfort in sugary foods and alcohol. A lack of energy and all around feeling of fatigue. […]

15 Feb 19
shoes of redfern

San Francisco sees Alan F before and after skiing jaunts. On the corner of California Street and Van Ness Ave this single child’s shoe means there’s another frantic mother looking at her semi-shod child thinking WTF. Thanks Alan Single child’s runner.

15 Feb 19
Poppy & Hugo

We spent an extended long weekend at Silverstar for Grandma Lynn’s 65th Birthday.  All of Grandma Lynn’s friends came from near and far and there was a LOT of celebration!  Highlights included lots of skiing, rosy cheeks, wine drinking and family time.  #HappyBirthday #itwascold #-20C #Silverstar

15 Feb 19
leafhopper farm

Well, we’re breaking snow records here at Leafhopper Farm. Last night we got a full 6″ on top of several other dumps we’ve had in the past two weeks. Supposedly this is the final big storm, and it’s still coming down out there as I write this. Luckily, not much is sticking any more, but […]

15 Feb 19
Regina Leader-Post

If you’re looking for something to do for Family Day on Monday, Waskimo offers an array of activities indoors and outdoors.

15 Feb 19
SPY

Warming up with a heavy-duty jacket doesn’t have to break the bank.

15 Feb 19
Caitlin Danborn

My name is Caitlin Danborn and I am a senior at Arvada West High School. I have been involved in my school’s journalism program for four years: one year as a reporter, one year as social media editor, and two years as Editor-in-Chief. In addition to journalism, I run cross country and track for A-West […]

15 Feb 19
Idle thoughts from a mountain

It is to be hoped that the Oxford English Dictionary has published its book of superlatives.  Otherwise, I might be struggling for new words to describe the skiing if the conditions this week continue for a few days longer. Yesterday, I said it was magnificent.  Today was more of the same.  It was warmer.  The […]