Smithwick

15 Jul 19
WGN Radio - 720 AM

Enter for a chance to win a cooking place for two at Cooking Skills Academy in Itasca with Lou Manfredini and Lindsey Smithwick of HouseSmarts Radio on Thursday, August 8, sponsored by DESIGNfirst Builders. [localtv_vendor_embed src= “https://wgnradio.secondstreetapp.com/Cook–Learn-with-Lou–Lindsey-at-Cooking-Skills-Academy-sponsored-by-DESIGNfirst-Builders/” height=”1600″ scrolling=”auto”]

14 Jul 19
The Mercury News
While there are no magical mice in “Rogers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella,” performers in Foothill Music Theatre’s production say the show will still appeal to fans of the Disney version of the fairytale. “The magic is still there,” says San Jose resident Melissa Gialdini, who plays stepsister Gabrielle. “There’s just a deeper story to it about doing something when you have a voice.” “It definitely still has the classic elements (of the fairytale), but with fun little twists,” agrees Sunnyvale native Christina Lea, who stars as the title character, known as Ella in the show. “She ends up falling for the prince, but there’s a lot more depth to the story. She really takes charge of her own life, and the people around her give her the tools. “It’s not just about a woman whose dreams all come true,” Lea says. “It’s about a larger purpose.” While the music and lyrics were written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for a 1957 teleplay, the show finally made it to Broadway in 2013, with an updated book by playwright Douglas Carter Beane framing the traditional story. In reading a translation of the original French fairytale by Charles Perrault, Beane discovered the fairy godmother was a beggar woman, shunned by all but the kindly Cinderella, so he added that characterization to his rewrite.   This kindness seeps into other characters who are usually thought of as ugly from the inside out. Gialdini says Gabrielle struggles with her family’s cruelty and yearns to escape with local revolutionary Jean-Michel (Jomar Martinez). “She’s actually very kind,” Gialdini says of her character. “In the environment she’s in, it’s harder for her to show kindness. She builds a bond with Ella, who shows her it’s okay to be kind.” Kindness also has an impact on Ella’s political activism, which is what leads her to her Prince Charming. “She wants to change the town and make it better,” Gialdini says. “She wants to make sure the prince knows the needs of the townspeople. “If you offer someone compassion and kindness, progress can happen quicker,” Lea adds. “People work better when they feel supported.” Lea hopes her portrayal will help support girls and young women who don’t conform to society’s view of what a princess should look like. “I’m very much a healthy woman,” she says. “I have curves. I look like a real person. “What I hope people take away from the show is that you don’t have to look like a Disney princess to be one.” “Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella” runs July 18-Aug. 4 at Smithwick Theatre, Foothill College, I-280 and El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Tickets are $12-$32 at www.foothill.edu/theatre or 650-949-7360.  
14 Jul 19
East Bay Times
While there are no magical mice in “Rogers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella,” performers in Foothill Music Theatre’s production say the show will still appeal to fans of the Disney version of the fairytale. “The magic is still there,” says San Jose resident Melissa Gialdini, who plays stepsister Gabrielle. “There’s just a deeper story to it about doing something when you have a voice.” “It definitely still has the classic elements (of the fairytale), but with fun little twists,” agrees Sunnyvale native Christina Lea, who stars as the title character, known as Ella in the show. “She ends up falling for the prince, but there’s a lot more depth to the story. She really takes charge of her own life, and the people around her give her the tools. “It’s not just about a woman whose dreams all come true,” Lea says. “It’s about a larger purpose.” While the music and lyrics were written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for a 1957 teleplay, the show finally made it to Broadway in 2013, with an updated book by playwright Douglas Carter Beane framing the traditional story. In reading a translation of the original French fairytale by Charles Perrault, Beane discovered the fairy godmother was a beggar woman, shunned by all but the kindly Cinderella, so he added that characterization to his rewrite.   This kindness seeps into other characters who are usually thought of as ugly from the inside out. Gialdini says Gabrielle struggles with her family’s cruelty and yearns to escape with local revolutionary Jean-Michel (Jomar Martinez). “She’s actually very kind,” Gialdini says of her character. “In the environment she’s in, it’s harder for her to show kindness. She builds a bond with Ella, who shows her it’s okay to be kind.” Kindness also has an impact on Ella’s political activism, which is what leads her to her Prince Charming. “She wants to change the town and make it better,” Gialdini says. “She wants to make sure the prince knows the needs of the townspeople. “If you offer someone compassion and kindness, progress can happen quicker,” Lea adds. “People work better when they feel supported.” Lea hopes her portrayal will help support girls and young women who don’t conform to society’s view of what a princess should look like. “I’m very much a healthy woman,” she says. “I have curves. I look like a real person. “What I hope people take away from the show is that you don’t have to look like a Disney princess to be one.” “Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella” runs July 18-Aug. 4 at Smithwick Theatre, Foothill College, I-280 and El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Tickets are $12-$32 at www.foothill.edu/theatre or 650-949-7360.  
14 Jul 19
Swimming World News

Competition for the 2019 Speedo Sectionals in Gainesville continued today at the O’Connell Pool. Day three events included the 100 back, 50 breast, 50 fly, 200 IM, 400 free, and 400 medley relay. Gator Swim Club continued to dominate the meet, with several first place finishers and multiple people in the top eight for every […]

12 Jul 19
Angora Chronicles

I never was much of a writer when I was younger. But I committed to myself that I’d stay in touch with my brother, Kenny by writing him often while he was away in Vietnam and also when he was stationed in Germany. Telephone calls were not possible in Vietnam, and much too expensive when […]

12 Jul 19
The Mercury News
Special Events Sunnyvale Farmers Market: Enjoy fresh fruits, vegetables and arts and crafts from local growers and artisans. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Murphy and Washington avenues, Sunnyvale. Urbanvillageonline.com/markets/Sunnyvale. Seniors Sunnyvale Senior Center: The center offers a variety of services and activities, billiards room, fitness center, table games, trips, classes and lunches every weekday. 550 E. Remington Drive, Sunnyvale. 408-730-7360, Sunnyvale.ca.gov. Senior Nutrition Program: Hot meals served along with camaraderie. Must be age 60 or older and a resident of Santa Clara County. Monday-Friday, live dance music at 9:30 a.m., lunch at 11 a.m. First United Methodist Church, 535 Old San Francisco Road, Sunnyvale. Sunnyvaleumc.org/mission/seniornutrition.html. Theater/Arts Music and Market: Sunnyvale’s 21st annual summer concert series continues with Touch of Class playing R&B and funk. July 17, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Sunnyvale. https://sunnyvaledowntown.com/summer-series-music–market.html. Historic Downtown Sunnyvale: This exhibit includes a series of photographs and maps depicting the slow growth and development of the early downtown, as well as artifacts from the first businesses lining Main Street and the railroad tracks. Through Oct. 20. Sunnyvale Heritage Park Museum, 570 E. Remington Drive. Museum hours are Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, noon-4 p.m. 408-749-0220, www.heritageparkmuseum.org. Cinderella: Foothill Music Theatre presents Rodgers and Hammerstein’s contemporary musical take on the classic fairy tale. July 18-Aug. 4. Smithwick Theatre, Foothill College, I-280 and El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. $12-$32. www.foothill.edu/theatre, 650-949-7360. The Language Archive: TheatreWorks Silicon Valley presents Julia Cho’s comedy about a linguist fighting to preserve the dying languages of far-flung cultures, only to neglect the promise and passion of his own. Through Aug. 4. Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. $30-$100. theatreworks.org or call 650-463-1960. Fine Arts League of Cupertino: The group meets the second Monday of the month, 7-9 p.m., and welcomes visitors. Quinlan Community Center, 10185 N. Stelling Road, Cupertino. Visit falc.org or call Janki at 408-863-9991. Lectures/Learning/Meetings Second Sunday Chess Fest: Free event for chess players of all ages. Second Sunday of the month through Oct. 13, 2-5 p.m. Stocklmeir School, 592 Dunholme Way, Sunnyvale at outdoor lunch tables facing Ortega Park. 408-736-7138. Cupertino Morningmasters: Improve your speaking and networking skills at this Toastmasters club. Thursdays, 7:30 a.m. Bethel Lutheran Church, 10181 Finch Ave., Cupertino. Sunnyvale Rotary: Meetings are Tuesdays at noon. Elks Club, 375 N. Pastoria Ave. Sunnyvalerotary.org. Dementia/Alzheimer’s Support Group: A safe, confidential, supportive environment for families to develop informal mutual support, get information about dementia and develop methods and skills to solve problems related to dementia. Fourth Tuesday of the month. Sunnyvale Presbyterian Church gym, 728 Fremont Ave., room 750, Sunnyvale. For more information, call the Alzheimer’s Association at 800-272-3900. Eating Disorders and Body Image Support Groups: The Eating Disorders Resource Center offers free support groups to create a safe space for those struggling with eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction. The groups are unstructured and open to all ages, genders and types of eating issues. Second and fourth Saturday of the month 9:30-11 a.m. for family and friends. El Camino Hospital, 2500 Grant Road, Mountain View. www.edrcsv.org. Open Gardens: Charles Street Gardens opens its gates to the public. Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 433 Charles St., Sunnyvale. Charlesstreetgardens.org. Military Officers Association of America: The Silicon Valley chapter holds a luncheon meeting on the third Thursday of the month. Siliconvalleymoaa.org, 408-245-2217. Submit a listing by emailing information about your event to cal@community-newspapers.com. Deadline is noon, two weeks prior to Friday’s publication.
12 Jul 19

Chapter 3 I couldn’t believe I was back home. Even after packing all of my earthly belongings, driving three in a half hours from the city, and unpacking my things into the basement apartment, I couldn’t believe it. But here I was, walking into my favorite local pub Murphy’s. Scott and Cindy were the owners […]

11 Jul 19
Writers Unite!

Welcome to Write the Story! Each month Writers Unite! will offer a writing prompt for writers to create a story from and share with everyone. WU! wants to help our members and followers to generate more traffic to their platforms. Please check out the authors’ blogs, websites, Facebook pages and show them support. We would love to hear your thoughts about the stories […]

05 Jul 19
The Man Born A Hundred Years Too Late

If you grew up in Marble Falls, you knew Glenn. If you ever passed through Marble Falls you may have encountered Glenn. His was a real life cowboy, doing ranch work most of his life. You always hear it said, that ole boy was born a hundred years too late. In Glenn’s case there was […]

05 Jul 19
The Man Born A Hundred Years Too Late

The following story is one like we could count on almost any day we were out and about. Some calamity was never far off.  Socks, a local Smithwick resident,  loved paint horses. He had a colt that he was prouder of than anything you could imagine. I’m not sure why this colt was so important to […]

05 Jul 19
The Man Born A Hundred Years Too Late

I rode a donkey mostly, while the other two rode fine saddle horses. It wasn’t always possible for me to keep up, but since most of the time we weren’t headed anywhere but maybe to the closest swimming hole, which was a place we called Billy Lamb Falls. That was over on Hickory Creek with […]

03 Jul 19
Choo Choo Travel

It was only 2 years ago that we were in New York City. I suppose in NYC time that’s like 10 years any where else.  Things have changed for the better  Building more buildings. Cranes everywhere. More Pedestrian walking space on Broadway near Times Square. I think the public buses are outside Manhattan, we haven’t […]

02 Jul 19
CBS San Francisco

In one week, downtown Los Gatos will undergo a rapid and dramatic transformation, all in an effort to boost business, encourage foot traffic and entice visitors to linger and stay a bit longer.

01 Jul 19
The Mercury News
Click here if you are having trouble viewing the slideshow on a mobile device. LOS GATOS – Hey Campbell, Los Gatos is getting jealous of your downtown. All those wine walks, farmer’s markets and festivals drawing trendy crowds to downtown Campbell have its neighbor to the south cooking up ways to attract more visitors to the upscale shops and critically acclaimed restaurants at the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains. So Los Gatos is about to try something dramatic: It’s putting its main downtown drag on a diet. Starting the week of July 8, the city is turning four blocks of North Santa Cruz Avenue into a one-way street, creating room for mini patios — complete with bistro tables and Adirondack chairs — in spots previously designated for parking. The goal is to enliven the quaint downtown, drawing pedestrians to linger over coffee or ice cream in these patio areas, known as parklets. “How can we make [Los Gatos] more of a destination than it already is?” Parks and Public Works Director Matt Morley said. “We want to make it more of a current type of downtown, with more activity on the sidewalks.” For now, it’s only a four-month experiment. And it comes as the town grapples with worsening traffic congestion from beachgoers looking for a shortcut onto Highway 17, which turns Los Gatos streets into parking lots and deters visitors who might otherwise spend the day there. While local business owners and merchants agree that downtown Los Gatos needs a shot of adrenaline, they’re not all convinced that this is the right solution. “I like that they are trying to think outside the box,” said Dan Reineke, general manager of Loma Brewing Company, a popular brewpub on Santa Cruz Avenue. “But honestly I think that this plan is not going to bring more people to Los Gatos.” In February, the town council approved the plan to turn North Santa Cruz Avenue into a southbound one-way street between Bachman Avenue and Elm Street and construct seven parklets on both sides of the street. Each parklet will sit atop two to three parking spaces and will be partitioned from the road by barriers. The $225,000 project will also add a bike lane and create diagonal parking spaces to ensure that no parking is lost. No other streets will be made into one-way northbound lanes. At the end of October, the parklets will disappear and the street will return to two-way traffic. If the project is a success, the town will consider long-term changes like widening the sidewalks, Morley said. Some business owners and residents are skeptical that the plan will do much to vitalize the downtown area or fix what they say is the real problem: beach traffic. “I can’t tell you how often, especially during the summer months, I look outside the store and it’s complete gridlock,” said Laura Smithwick, general manager of Great Bear Coffee. Customers complain to her that they ride their bikes or walk to the grocery store instead of drive because the traffic means one errand can sometimes take hours in the car. “I see downtown Campbell being way more lively and more of a go-to destination than Los Gatos,” she said. “Maybe [customers are] avoiding traffic.” Morley says the pilot program is not intended to solve Los Gatos’ traffic problem. “We’re trying to peel them apart and view them as separate conversations,” he said. And while some merchants and locals compare downtown Los Gatos to Campbell, town officials say Los Gatos isn’t trying to copy any other local hot spot. “Los Gatos has its own identity,” said Monica Renn, the town’s economic vitality manager. “We’re not looking to emulate anybody or become anybody else.” The two downtowns attract distinct demographics, said David MacGregor-Scholes, who co-owns the boutique Redemption with his wife, Tammy. They have locations in both downtown Los Gatos and downtown Campbell. “We don’t like to compare them. They’re two different places,” he said. While Campbell has evolved in recent years, MacGregor-Scholes sees the new parklet program as a way to make Los Gatos a destination. “All those people sitting on the streets in their cars going to the beach, those are the people we need to get out of their cars and into the town,” he said. “Hopefully this will have a big positive effect.” While other streets like Lincoln Avenue in Willow Glen and Pruneridge Avenue in San Jose have been narrowed to make room for bikes and pedestrians, Morley said he’s not aware of any other nearby recent one-way street conversions. Reineke is unsure whether the parklets will be a big enough draw to more shoppers and pedestrians on foot. And for families, he’d like to see more green spaces where children can roam freely instead of confining them to enclosed patios. “If you’re going to use a parklet, you’re tethered to it,” he said. “It’s like a cage for kids.” But MacGregor-Scholes is optimistic. “Los Gatos isn’t this downer, dying town,” he said. “It’s just going through an evolutionary process.”