Southern Living

24 Jul 19
KTSM News Channel 9
CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEXICO — As the highway stretches farther away from the United States, the vast Chihuahuan desert appears to swallow the outskirts of this border city. In one of the sparse neighborhoods built to house workers from the city’s massive factories, known as maquilas in Spanish, mangy dogs scoured for food around houses marred by broken windows and graffiti — and Oscar, a migrant from Honduras, recounted the second-worst beating of his life. “When I was going to apply for asylum [last month], they beat me up,” the 30-year old Honduran said from a two-bedroom house where as many as eight people live. Oscar, who asked that his last name not be revealed, said the attackers asked if he was from Honduras, and when he said yes, they pounced. He showed scars on his forehead where his face was cracked open and lifted his lip to show where most of his teeth had been before the assault. Oscar said he fled Honduras with his wife and three children because of something even worse. He lifted his shirt to show the scars from more than a dozen staples he needed after he was shot by gang members in his home country and nearly killed. The family arrived a few months ago and now lives in a small house owned by the son of a sympathetic Ciudad Juárez resident who is also risking her safety by sheltering as many migrants as she can. “I’m scared to go to work,” he added. But he still goes to his job at a nearby construction site, where he gets paid under the table. What happened to Oscar is becoming more common since the surge of Central American and Cuban migrants began arriving in this city a few years ago, immigration attorneys and advocates say. But they contend that the problem has become worse since the Trump administration implemented two policies that force asylum seekers to spend months in Mexican border cities like Ciudad Juárez. Under the administration’s “metering” policy, migrants are forced to wait for months before they are allowed to apply for asylum in the United States. That was followed earlier this year in Texas by the Migrant Protection Protocols, known as “remain in Mexico,” which requires asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their court hearings. More than 10,000 asylum seekers have been sent back to Ciudad Juárez under the program, and thousands more have sheltered in the city as they wait their turn to request asylum. In interviews with journalists and human rights advocates, and in sworn testimony in immigration proceedings, asylum seekers have described how they have been extorted, assaulted and raped by criminals after being returned to Mexico. Since the beating, Oscar said, he has yet to apply for asylum; he is weighing his options as he and his family lie low on the outskirts of Ciudad Juárez. And they might not have a roof over their heads if not for a loose network of Hondurans who quietly offer one another aid and shelter. The house belongs to the son of a Mexican citizen named Elena; she lives across the street with her Honduran husband. Her son, who is away in southern Mexico, asked his mother to rent out his property. But Elena decided to offer it as a safe haven to some of her husband’s countrymen. “I do it because it makes me sad to see so many people in the streets,” she said. “They have kids and they don’t have enough to eat.” Elena is also helping a 24-year-old Honduran named Alexander, who applied for asylum in early June after he crossed the Rio Grande into El Paso. Alexander, who asked that his last name not be revealed because he fears retaliation in Mexico, said he was detained for 18 days and at one point asked to be sent back to Honduras rather than remain in detention indefinitely. Alexander holds his passport and Mexican documents in the house where he’s stayed on the outskirts of Ciudad Juárez since he was sent back across the border as part of President Trump’s “remain in Mexico” program.  Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The Texas Tribune “They said, ‘You’re here, no one invited you, so wait for what’s coming.’ And that’s when they sent us back to Ciudad Juárez.” Like thousands of others, Alexander said he fled north because of the violence in Honduras, where police are unwilling or unable to help fight the gangs that have terrorized the Central American country. “They killed my aunt, and I don’t know where a lot of my family members are,” he said. So he made his way across Guatemala and Mexico and crossed the river alone. He has legal permission to stay in Mexico after he was given a temporary visa. But the visa doesn’t allow him to legally work, he said, and he’s been turned down repeatedly when he tried to find a job at nearby factories. “I’ve tried to get papers, but I don’t have the right ones,” he said. Under pressure from the Trump administration to shelter more Central American migrants, the Mexican government has awarded work visas to some migrants waiting for their court dates in the United States. Enrique Valenzuela, the director of Ciudad Juárez’s Centro de Atención a Migrantes, a migrant transition facility operated by the Chihuahua state government, told The Texas Tribune last week that his office is trying to help more migrants apply for the visas. But Alexander said he wasn’t aware that the agency could help him — and after what happened to Oscar, he said he’s hesitant to leave the safety of Elena’s house, which is guarded by the couple’s two dogs. “It’s dangerous here; you can’t leave,” he said. “I just stay here.” Elena knows the danger the migrants face. Five years ago, when the migrant surge began in earnest, she said, municipal police officers broke into her home and accused her and her husband of trafficking and illegally harboring migrants. Then they attacked her husband even though she said there were no migrants in her house when the police arrived. “They beat him up, they put a bag over his face and they tried to make him say that he’s from Honduras and he had fake papers,” she said. “That’s why I’m scared. A neighbor, I don’t know who, said that a lot of Hondurans lived here. I am scared because I’m afraid they’ll accuse me of being a [smuggler].” Immigration lawyer Eduardo Beckett sits next to his client, Bertha Arias, as he speaks to Elena, the owner of the safe house where Arias stays in Ciudad Juárez.  Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The Texas Tribune On Friday, Elena made the drive to downtown Juárez with another Honduran migrant she’s sheltered for several months, 64-year-old Bertha Arias. Arias applied for asylum in the United States with her granddaughter in November 2016 after the 15-year-old was told by members of the notorious MS-13 gang that she had to marry a gang member, said her El Paso-based attorney, Eduardo Beckett. When Arias and her granddaughter arrived at the border, Beckett said, the teen was placed with her mother, who lived in Houston, while Arias was sent to a processing center in El Paso, where she spent 19 months waiting for her asylum claim to be heard. A U.S. immigration judge denied Arias’ claim, and she was deported back to Honduras, where she faced more death threats from the gang, Beckett said. She again fled to Mexico and was able to get in touch with Elena’s husband, who took her in. Now she’s living in the shadows until the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals rules on her appeal of the asylum denial. Bertha Arias (left) cries as she says goodbye to Elena before walking to the international bridge to try to ask U.S. immigration authorities for permission to stay in the U.S. with her family as she waits for her asylum appeal.  Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The Texas Tribune In what he knew was a long shot, Beckett convinced Arias to try crossing the international bridge with him Friday so he could ask U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials to grant her an interview with asylum officers. Beckett said he hoped U.S. officials would let her stay in Texas while the appeal was being decided. Arias agreed, and as she left Elena’s house, Oscar’s young children peered through the windows of the house across the street. During the 30-minute drive to downtown Ciudad Juárez, Bertha was quiet, and Becket told stories about other clients to break the tension. When they arrived at a parking garage, Elena and Arias embraced and cried before Arias walked with the lawyer to the bridge. Beckett showed a CBP officer stationed in the middle of the international bridge his client’s documents. Another officer listened attentively to Beckett’s plea, then called in the request to his supervisors. He offered Arias and Beckett bottles of water as they waited in the triple-digit heat. But in the end, Arias was sent back to Ciudad Juárez and told to wait. “I feel like I let her down. I could have tried harder,” Beckett said as he walked toward the U.S. side of the bridge. “But if something happens to her, they’re going to have blood on their hands.”
24 Jul 19
jobads

Are you a fresher or experienced person and searching for a job? If yes then do not run from office to office for getting a job as you are living in the era of innovation. Then you may find how to do it? The answer is simple with the help of online job portal Jobads.in. […]

24 Jul 19
Metro
The little boy had a metal chain locked around his neck (Picture: IC in Krasnodar region/east2west) A starving ten-year-old boy has been found with a chain around his neck after allegedly escaping his ‘tyrant’ father. The schoolboy, who has been named as Tikhon, ran to a shop where he was found with the metal noose still clasped around his neck. Shocked checkout staff asked him about the shackles and he told them his 46-year-old father had imprisoned him in a shed. The unnamed Russian businessman had reportedly rushed his pregnant second wife to hospital, and Tikhon managed to free himself by breaking the chain with a wooden bar. He boy begged the shop staff, in the village of Velikovechnoye, in Krasnodar, southern Russia, not to tell his father he had fled but they called police. Firefighters rescue the boy from the chains (Picture: IC in Krasnodar region/east2west) Firefighters then freed him from the chain. The boy told officers he had been regularly chained by the neck in the cellar or shed or fixed to a radiator in the family’s home, often for long periods. Tikhon was taken for medical checks and later put into care in a social rehabilitation centre. The Kremlin’s children’s ombudswoman Anna Kuznetsova intervened to call on the Russian Investigative Committee to probe the allegations about the businessman. The child had been living with his father and stepmother, but now his real mother has demanded that the boy his removed from the businessman’s care. The boy is seen wandering around the shop by himself in CCTV footage (Picture: LIFE) [metro-video id=”1971912″ video=”https://videos.metro.co.uk/video/met/2019/07/24/8537288111498743092/1024x576_MP4_8537288111498743092.mp4” image=”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/07/24/08/16427028-0-image-a-20_1563952410631.jpg“] His mother Viktoria said: ‘I am extremely concerned about his fate. ‘I want him to be with me, and not with his tyrant dad.’ She said the boy was ‘very worried that he will go back to his father, but I will do everything to prevent this’. Teachers said they had expressed concerns about the boy’s well-being but the authorities had taken no action. The father, who has two children with his second wife, has been called in for interrogation. He reportedly told police that the boy had locked himself in chains. The investigation continues. [metro-fact-box id=”8027376″ title=”Got a story for Metro.co.uk?” icon=”exclamation” /]
24 Jul 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
This week’s news was dominated by the controversy over whether or not Donald J. Trump is a racist. Including a big imbroglio in the Congress over a statement by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who called out the pr*sident for attacking four female Democratic Congresswomen of color, by Tweeting they should “go back” to where they came from. Since three of the representatives were native born Americans, and the fourth a naturalized citizen, the pr*sidential Tweet seemed nonsensical on its face. This over the top race baiting did what it was designed to do, divert attention from the humanitarian crisis caused by Trump’s southern border policy; and once again the media played into Trump’s strategy of distraction, by allowing its 24/7 coverage of the aftermath of the House vote to condemn the pr#sident’s racist Tweet to dominate the news cycle. What Trump did not anticipate was strong public rejection of his racist Tweet, which was designed to bolster his base. His blatant racism backfired, because it is a betrayal of American values. American democracy is underpinned by the tenet that every person is treated equally under the law. Racism is antithetical to democracy, because it denies equality. American history is replete with prejudice toward each new wave of immigrants. Is it surprising that fear of the “other” is still being exploited as a Nativist political argument in the service of maintaining white privilege? Just as dehumanization of Muslims allowed this country to invade Iraq under false pretense?  Just as poll taxes and other voting restrictions disenfranchised black Americans under Jim Crow? Trump just added another chapter to America’s sordid history of dehumanizing immigrants and non-whites for political gain. His GOP sycophants in the House of Representatives are so afraid of losing their jobs, only a handful have decried Trump’s racist Tweet, to say nothing of his human rights abuses. Meanwhile, the Evangelical Right abandon their moral principles, by their silence on Trump’s racist Tweet. The inhumane incarceration of asylum seeking individuals and separated immigrant families in overcrowded cages (in some cases for months) was effectively displaced from the public discourse by this latest Trumpian shiny object (Tweet), which sucked the air from cable news reporting of the humanitarian crisis on the border. Trump’s predictable strategy is to divert attention from the failure of his border policy, by creating another controversy for the press to cover. Rather than recounting the numerous humanitarian abuses perpetrated by Border Patrol, HHS, and private prison contractors, let’s focus on the intentional degrading of teen age migrant girls in at least one US detention facility. In this detention center, as was witnessed and reported by Congressional Democratic representatives, several migrant teen age girls described their embarrassment, when going to the toilet. Because there was no toilet (!), only several buckets in the back of the room in which those young people were caged. Detainees were expected to defecate in those buckets. Which had no privacy. These girls and young women had to do their most intimate toilet functions in plain view of every one, including boys and young men, whose view of those waste buckets was unimpeded by any kind of privacy curtain. So in at least one US detention facility, immigrants in US custody are being forced to urinate and defecate in buckets, in view of other detainees in their cages. And in other detention facilities, detainees are told to drink water from the toilets. And in other detention centers, girls shower in their underwear, fearing that a male will walk in on them. This redefines barbarism. Intentionally imposed humiliation of detainees is a hallmark of the Trump pr*sidency. Just as humiliation was an interrogation tactic of the Bush administration in the treatment of Guantanamo and Abu Graib detainees. This deliberate cruelty is being perpetrated by your government in the name of the American people, in your name. In. Your. Name. intercept arms manu -Jeff Konicek is a retired educator and bonsai expert living in Laytonville.
24 Jul 19
Sufficient Living

Found in southern Scotland, growing on a large tree stump possibly (birch or beach). Hand for scale. https://ift.tt/2y8Peim

24 Jul 19
Intune Blog

Another great week of live in the Bay Area. Here are some suggestion for this week.. Monday August 19th Club Deluxe 1511 Haight St, San Francisco 9:30 PM-12:30 AM Showtime… Mike Olmos Presents The Sessions. Mike is a such a great trumpet player. He leads his all star Sessions for a great night of jazz.. […]

24 Jul 19
Stephnni

So, you may not know it, but I’m currently going through the Nigerian Law School program and I was posted to the Yola Campus. Honestly, when I first found out, I HATED IT!! Heck, I cried when I saw what campus I was posted to. I had all the fears of someone who has hardly […]

24 Jul 19
Russia News Now

not Good News! July 24 – 2019 Iran pays the salaries of the Hezbollah soldiers in Lebanon, but their pay that was not a living wage has been cut in half as Iran is feeling the pain of the Trump sanctions.  Theses are battle hardened soldiers and very tired. Mix that with a low morale […]

24 Jul 19
Radical Discipleship

By Kendall Waterman, Re-shared from Geez magazine. “My mother connects me to a past I would have no other way of knowing. And in this sea of whiteness, of friends, enemies and strangers, I look at her and know who I am.” – Michèle Pearson Clarke, Transition Two minutes into a phone call with my […]

24 Jul 19
CauseACTION Clarion

On today’s podcast we preview the much anticipated Congressional testimony of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Democrats are desperate for something new to come out of this to keep their impeachment dreams alive. Anti-Semite Democrats suffered a humiliating loss in the House yesterday, Huma takes in Weiner, Cory Booker would like to punch the President, […]