Spectral

16 Jun 19
Ghost of Shakespeare

(Apologies to those who have already read this piece, which has appeared elsewhere and which is a touch more academic than the typical ghost post. Even ghosts must sometimes haunt other places, however. Sometimes, they even appear at conferences.) We have just reached that point where latest night bleeds into earliest morning.  A man paces […]

16 Jun 19
Widowcranky

Did you know that the fear of belly buttons is called omphalophobia?  I can’t really imagine being afraid of, what is essentially a scar which reminds you of your own creation, but I don’t like people on stilts, so each to their own. Michelangelo, was a bit of a rock star of art, having the […]

16 Jun 19
Vijay's blogs

Kodaikkanal is a beautiful quintessential town situated at 6600 feet above, in the south western tip of the mountains of the Indian Western Ghats. Kodai, has its own charm, and I have been coming here for over 4 decades now, when time permits, to relax, rewind and reboot. It’s a fragile ecosystem like any small […]

16 Jun 19
The Master Of Trance Music

Nuovo set di giugno che parte con Nick Silvestri e il remix di Matt Lange per Above & Beyond prima di trovare Orkidea e il suo debutto su VII, il promo di Zoë Johnston per la prima volta fuori da Anjunabeats, Andrew Bayer, Ferry Corsten con BT e il promo di Carlo Resoort. Rub!k e […]

16 Jun 19
ATOPIES

“Ghosts of Extinction: an Essay in Spectral Ecopolitics” is my essay for Oxford Literary Review, Vol 41, Issue 1, July 2019: Ext: Writing Extinction, edited by Sarah Wood.  

16 Jun 19
Hotsprice | Search Compare And Buy Products With Best Price And Features

Google Pixel 4 series, codenamed Coral and Flame for Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL, is anticipated to arrive in October 2019 but we are seeing leaks and rumours regarding the two devices still before the launch of Pixel 3A series. However, Google set an end to the design leaks, perception renders and rumours as […]

16 Jun 19
The Siasat Daily

Washington: Researchers have discovered that the visible yellow pattern on the surface of Jupiter’s moon — Europa — is actually sodium chloride, an ingredient we use on a daily basis. Using a visible light spectral analysis, planetary scientists have discovered that the yellow colour visible on portions of the surface of Europa is table salt, […]

16 Jun 19
FortNite FTW

Coming back to save the world, how do birthday llamas work again? So for the past two weeks I have been playing Save The World and have been enjoying it a ton. With Birthday llamas coming back out, which items are eligible as a possibility to obtain from the bday llamas? From what I understand […]

16 Jun 19
GeoEnergy Math

In Chapter 12 of the book, we concentrated on the mechanism behind the QBO of stratospheric equatorial winds. In a related topic (but only briefly touched on in the book), there is interesting data from a presentation on the equatorial-only Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) of the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere wind pattern [1]. The distinction […]

16 Jun 19
cosmologic

Hubble’s fallacy His conclusion, that space is expanding, based on the apparent recession velocities, of remote galaxies, by measuring the red-shift, depending on space expanding, along the velocity components of the lines-of-sight, ignoring the inability of measuring oblique velocities due to the fact that the galaxies are so far away, parallax being unobservable, is flawed; […]

16 Jun 19
Magui's Blog

Social learning is made easy using media and technology.  Social learning, particularly, observational learning occurs almost every time we watch television, movies, youtube and other online communications and services.  While before, observational learning occurs mostly via face-to-face interactions; today, we can now communicate with our family, friends, colleagues and teachers online. Back in 2013, I […]

16 Jun 19
Ebook Mania

The tale of *The Wolf Gift* continues . . .
In Anne Rice’s surprising and compelling best-selling novel, the first of her strange and mythic imagining of the world of wolfen powers (“I devoured these pages . . . As solid and engaging as anything she has written since her early *Vampire Chronicles* fiction”—Alan Cheuse, *The Boston Globe* ; “A delectable cocktail of old-fashioned lost-race adventure, shape-shifting, and suspense”—Elizabeth Hand, *The Washington Post* ), readers were spellbound as Rice conjured up a daring new world set against the wild and beckoning California coast.
Now in her new novel, as lush and romantic in detail and atmosphere as it is sleek and steely in storytelling, Anne Rice takes us once again to the rugged coastline of Northern California, to the grand mansion at Nideck Point, and further explores the unearthly education of her transformed Man Wolf.
The novel opens on a cold, gray landscape. It is the beginning of December. Oak fires are burning in the stately flickering hearths of Nideck Point. It is Yuletide.
For Reuben Golding, now infused with the Wolf Gift and under the loving tutelage of the Morphenkinder, this promises to be a Christmas like no other . . .
The Yuletide season, sacred to much of the human race, has been equally sacred to the Man Wolves, and Reuben soon becomes aware that they, too, steeped in their own profound rituals, will celebrate the ancient Midwinter festival deep within the verdant richness of Nideck forest.
From out of the shadows of Nideck comes a ghost—tormented, imploring, unable to speak yet able to embrace and desire with desperate affection . . . As Reuben finds himself caught up with—and drawn to—the passions and yearnings of this spectral presence, and as the swirl of preparations reaches a fever pitch for the Nideck town Christmas festival of music and pageantry, astonishing secrets are revealed; secrets that tell of a strange netherworld, of spirits other than the Morphenkinder, centuries old, who inhabit the dense stretches of redwood and oak that surround the magnificent house at Nideck Point, “ageless ones” who possess their own fantastical ancient histories and who taunt with their dark magical powers . . .

16 Jun 19
Ebook Mania

National best-selling authors Barb and J. C. Hendee present the newest breathtaking chapter in the epic Noble Dead saga…. Waylaid in their quest for the orb of the air, Magiere, Leesil, Chap, and Wayfarer have all been wrongly imprisoned. But it is Magiere, the dhampir, who suffers the most, as a cloaked interrogator employs telepathic torture. Arriving at the Suman port city in search of Magiere, Wynn Hygeorht and her companions – including vampire Chane Andraso – seek out Domin Ghassan il’Sanke for assistance, which proves no easy task. The domin is embroiled in a secret hunt for a spectral undead with the power to invade anyone living and take the body as its host. Even if Wynn can manage to free her friends from prison, battling this entirely new kind of undead hidden inside host bodies may be a challenge none of them can survive….

16 Jun 19
museworthy

This year, in December, it will be fifteen years since my father died. His presence feels further and further away as time passes. That’s what happens to the departed – they recede into something sketchy and fragmentary. Spectral-like. Not random loose bits and pieces zig-zagging about, but not whole either. Yes, I can accurately recall […]

15 Jun 19
Boulder Daily Camera
In a letter to his brother in 1888, Vincent van Gogh, painter of perhaps the most famous night scene in art history, outlined his life’s basic necessities. These included the strength to work all day on a little bread and at night to smoke and drink. He added, “And all the same to feel the stars and the infinite high and clear above you. Then life is after all almost enchanted.” He wrote this letter at a time and from a place, the south of France, where views of the night sky were unencumbered by mass electric lighting. He would have found existence in the over-lighted Front Range of Colorado most unenchanting. A light pollution map of the world produced by the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder depicts a bulbous blot of artificial light that stretches from Fort Collins to Pueblo. The map indicates that 80 percent of Americans and a third of all humanity can no longer see the Milky Way through the soup of illumination that muddies the night sky. And the problem in the United States is said to be growing by up to 5% a year. This is one of the reasons Gov. Jared Polis is to be commended for proclaiming June the state’s first Dark Sky Month. The blight of light pollution extends beyond mere aesthetics. It has implications for the economy, human health, wildlife and safety. As noted in the governor’s proclamation, “light pollution represents a waste of natural resources amounting to at least $2 billion per year and contributes to diminished American energy independence.” Some scientific studies suggest light pollution can contribute to obesity, depression, diabetes and even breast cancer. A study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health found no evidence that reductions in street lighting in England and Wales led to an increase in traffic collisions or crime. “Outdoor lighting is intended to enhance safety and security at night, but too much lighting can actually have the opposite effect,” according to the International Dark-Sky Association. “Glare from bright, unshielded lights actually decreases safety because it shines into our eyes and constricts our pupils.” Boulder is a trailblazer on this issue. The city adopted an outdoor lighting ordinance in 2003, and one of the intentions of the law was to clear out enough light pollution so that the Milky Way would reappear in the city. The law had a 15-year implementation period and went into effect last November, but enforcement won’t actually begin until this November. Local homeowners and business owners have some catching up to do. As of January, about 21% of non-residential properties and 32% of residential properties were out of compliance. (One thing to watch out for — Christmas lights can go up only from Nov. 15 to Jan. 30.) Individuals, not just governments, have some responsibility here. Turn off your lights when they’re not necessary. You’ll save money. And your sky-gazing neighbors will appreciate the gesture. Better yet, look up. Measures that restore darkness to the night will fall short of their promise if Coloradans neglect the overhead treasures dimmed lights deliver. There are 115 International Dark Sky Places in the world, and two — Westcliffe and Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve — are an easy day-trip from Boulder. Simply observing space on a clear night inspires deep reflection on the universe and humankind’s place in it. But viewers might enrich their experience if they ponder some mind-blowing science: The universe is believed to have come into being 13.8 billion years ago. Some cosmologists think it burst into existence from empty space — from nothing. The universe could be infinite or finite, no one’s sure, and this is just the universe we know — theoretical physics suggests there might be an infinite number of other universes. Galaxies are all moving away from our own galaxy at an accelerating pace. Every galaxy contains something like 100 billion stars, and the whole universe might harbor up to 1 septillion stars (a 1 with 24 zeros). The center of the Milky Way is located in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius (it will rise a little after 9 p.m. today). The Earth and sun reside in one of the Milky Way’s spiral arms and travel at about 515,000 mph around the galaxy center. The Earth is traveling around the sun at 66,000 mph. And, at Colorado’s latitude, the view of space shifts from east to west at more than 800 mph due to the Earth’s rotation. Is there life out there? No one knows, yet, but some signs point to the increasing likelihood that there is. The first exoplanet (a planet that revolves around a star other than the sun) was discovered in 1995. To date more than 4,000 have been identified. It’s a rare, impervious soul who can face the brilliant universe and not feel moved by a numinous or divine force, and ultimately, whatever it means, in whatever form one responds, it impels people closer together. This influence could be the primary benefit of dark skies. It’s akin to what astronauts call “the overview effect” — when you understand Earth as part of a larger whole you tend to see all inhabitants of the planet as members of one family. Partisan squabbles appear irrelevant. Political brawls look trivial. War seems dumb. Everyday stresses are surrendered in the recognition of a purpose grander than any one person or nation. A dark sky brightens the world. Van Gogh was moved by the poetry of Walt Whitman, the world’s greatest literary champion for democracy and brotherhood, and evidence suggests Whitman’s “Song of Myself” influenced van Gogh’s masterpiece “The Starry Night,” in which the artist renders the moon and stars as swirling spectral organisms. The firmament of space is a persistent presence in “Song of Myself,” the very first lines of which tie the individual to all others in the most communal possible way: “I celebrate myself, and sing myself/And what I assume you shall assume,/For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.” Quentin Young, for the editorial board, quentin@dailycamera.com, @qpyoungnews.