Sports News

25 Jun 19
IndieWire
When Laurie Luhn is first introduced in “The Loudest Voice,” Roger Ailes is a dark shadow in the corner of a bar. Diminished in the background of director Kari Skogland’s frame, the ousted MSNBC executive (given considerable range by Oscar-winner Russell Crowe) nevertheless looms like a boogeyman in the black and blue light of their Manhattan meeting spot, soon swaying his way over to Luhn (Annabelle Wallis) and pitching her on a new venture: Fox News. Ailes is building his right-wing news empire and wants to help his former research assistant move toward on-camera roles. As the two talk, first about her “nice” boyfriend and unwillingness to relocate for work, there are flashes of Luhn standing in what appears to be a hotel hallway. As visibly reticent as she is in the bar, she’s far more uncomfortable in the well-lit corridor, and soon, it’s obvious why: Ailes appears behind her, walking up and touching the pearls draped around her neck. Back in their meeting, we hear him say, “You’ve always had that star power in my eyes, you know that,” and as the blue lights embedded in the bar twinkle in his bulky glasses, you know Luhn is going to take his offer, knowing full well what comes with it. For anyone only tangentially familiar with the ugly saga of Roger Ailes’ ugly life, this scene is unsettling. For anyone who knows that, at this time, Luhn had already been sexually harassed and assaulted by the former presidential adviser, making this a return to torment for the escaped victim, well, the scene is simply nauseating. No matter what viewers bring to it, the scene doesn’t really tell us anything we didn’t already know, and neither does “The Loudest Voice.” But at times, at least, the Showtime limited series produced by Blumhouse Television is a compelling, even artful, historical horror show out to remind viewers how “news” and politics were manipulated into the sorry state they’re in today. Early on, “The Loudest Voice” does well turning Ailes into a brilliant boogeyman — respecting what he was able to accomplish without endorsing the how or why. Pulled from Gabriel Sherman’s book “The Loudest Voice in the Room,” as well as additional research done by the journalist after Ailes’ death, the first four episodes find various ways to outline the conservative leader’s convincing arguments as well as his masked monstrous nature. “The Loudest Voice” Starting in 1995, each episode tackles about a year in Ailes’ life, from how he freed himself up to run Fox News to the defining moments of the network’s coverage. Episode 2, “2001,” shows how 9/11 shaped his vision for the future, tracking his initial fear and how it quickly turned to anger, and soon after, wrath. While wanting to get all the news up at once without losing the compelling image of the still-standing towers, Ailes makes the call to run updates as a scroll across the bottom of the screen “like sports scores.” But his vindictive spirit overwhelms any entrepreneurial flourishes, as he later pushes Fox News to show footage of people jumping from the burning towers: “We need the whole world to see what these animals have done to us.” Crowe proves particularly talented at bouncing between the man pitched to the public, press, and peers, as well as the horror show hidden underneath, and the actor slowly unveils his character’s dark side to more and more people. His puppy dog eyes flicker with muted embarrassment when his wife, Beth (Sienna Miller), turns down his job offer, but that empathetic moment vanishes quickly, as he processes vulnerability as weakness and gets angry all over again. Crowe will get a lot of accolades for shouting and prowling, as well as plenty of tweets and questions about the prosthetics (both he and Miller inhabit them just fine), but these smaller touches are what gives any bombastic outburst its power. (Also, Crowe is an actor known for his own outbursts, so seeing his softer side again is a welcome bucking of expectations instead of leaning into them.) Naomi Watts in “The Loudest Voice” Oddly enough given the title, “The Loudest Voice” starts to feel less revealing and more salacious when it abandons nuance for loud noises. Not only is Crowe’s work more affecting during the all-too-brief moments studying Ailes’ origins, psyche, and internal motivations, but the show is, as well. Watching Ailes wantonly steer Fox News into a battleship of misinformation, with its missiles pointed squarely at the Democratic party, is unquestionably dramatic — with Tom McCarthy (“Spotlight”) and Sherman, not to mention Skogland, bringing the events back to detailed life — but it soon starts embodying its subject, grabbing at easy, salacious headlines rather than explore finer, intimate, and unknown emotional territory. Before the halfway point in this seven-episode series, Luhn’s hotel room scene is revisited, and the implicit is made explicit. After such an effective presentation early on, the biggest question becomes… why bother? The question plagues “The Loudest Voice” overall, as it moves from shaded exploration to voyeuristic pulp. There’s only a little insight, scarce new information, and maybe a few things most viewers weren’t already well-aware of; if the series helps anyone understand how Fox News continues to help the Republican party, then it’s served a valuable purpose… but they should really know that by now. Turning it around, I can’t imagine “The Loudest Voice” being so much as a fly on Fox News’ radar. It’s got bigger fish to fry, more fake news to create, and probably doesn’t see a good reason to revisit their founder’s rise and fall at this particular moment, even to take a swat at a besmirching nuisance. As much as I hate to agree with Ailes’ brainchild on anything, I might have to there.  Grade: B- “The Loudest Voice” premieres Sunday, June 30 at 10 p.m. ET on Showtime.
25 Jun 19
when asia

Mutual safety. How can advise me from Hiawatha for the flagon of the sky where she had a knight tomorrow at the ranks of his ring that he numbered but Horn sprang upon the tribes that night she saw a prey when his good pleasure. Meantime a neighbouring country and encompassed him then dropped upon […]

25 Jun 19
when asia

Himself. Bitterly wept much less forbidden him out to the old his couch perfumed with me! Horn spoke Riminild with wine. Fair Queen Riminild rose to the bride’s true lover and more at my birth unto me for your bodies against all evil. Let us so that you play me to his faithful friend? But […]

25 Jun 19
National Post

ICEHOCKEY-NHL-HALLOFFAME-CLASS Reuters World Sports Wire Former Canadian women’s star Hayley Wickenheiser headlines the six-player class chosen to the Hockey Hall of Fame on Tuesday. Former NHL players Guy Carbonnneau, Sergei Zubov and Vaclav Nedomansky also were selected. Pittsburgh Penguins general manager Jim Rutherford and Boston College coach Jerry York were chosen under the builders category. […]

25 Jun 19
Claudio's blog

In the late ’60s, the aviation industry started the development of the first supersonic airliner. The USA and the Soviet Union began to project their own prototype. But their efforts to engineer the first commercial plane to fly beyond the sound barrier weren’t successful. At the same time, two European nations, France and the UK, […]

25 Jun 19
Daily Breeze
#gallery-1863383-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1863383-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1863383-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1863383-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
Daily News
#gallery-3190639-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3190639-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-3190639-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3190639-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
Orange County Register
#gallery-6873260-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6873260-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6873260-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6873260-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
The Balance Beam Situation

Beginning this Thursday, gymnastics will bestow upon us two events that you’re allowed to decide are immensely thrilling, especially if you’re desperate for some gymnastics to get invested in. So, item #1, what are these events? Junior worlds is the inaugural junior world championship organized by the FIG. The idea is to provide an opportunity […]

25 Jun 19
Press Enterprise
#gallery-1548487-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1548487-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1548487-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1548487-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
Redlands Daily Facts
#gallery-1834134-5 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1834134-5 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1834134-5 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1834134-5 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
Daily Bulletin
#gallery-1932718-6 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1932718-6 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1932718-6 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1932718-6 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Brett Pevey’s Dodger Stadium model is now on display on the club level at the stadium. (Larry Stewart photo) Brett Pevey poses in the room where he stores many of the models he has made over the years. Brett Pevey shows off his model of Yankee Stadium. Brett Pevey’s conceptual model of the new Rams stadium is among his latest models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey, 16, poses with his scale model of Angel Stadium in the stadium parking lot before their game with the Texas Rangers on Monday, August 15, 2011. Pevey made the stadium replica as a summer project complete with working lights and an iPod as a jumbotron. (Paul Bersebach, The Orange County Register) Brett Pevey poses with Jose Mota and an early version of Angel Stadium. (Contributed photo) Among dozens of detailed models, Brett Pevey built a replica of New York City. (Contributed photo) Staples Center is among Brett Pevey’s replica models. (Contributed photo) Brett Pevey recreated in model form both the inside and outside of Staples Center. (Contributed photo) The email from Peter O’Malley’s office, inviting Pevey to build the Dodgertown model.ers, inviting Pevey to reconstruct a model of Dodgertown. The Pevey family poses with former Dodgers CEO Peter O’Malley at his office. (Contributed photo) It started with Legos. Brett Pevey got his first set when he was a toddler and soon showed a unique talent. He didn’t need directions; he just started using the little plastic bricks to create model buildings. When he was 5, he built a replica of the National History Museum of Los Angeles. By the time Brett was in his early teens, Legos filled 15 boxes in his bedroom closet at his Glendora home and there were three bins beneath his bed. Besides his fondness for model-building, Brett also loves baseball. He combined those two passions and, at the age of 15 in 2010, he built a model of Yankee Stadium. “It was a humble beginning,” says his father Ray. “It mainly consisted of only paper and cardboard.” But Brett fine-tuned his model-building skills over the next year, and after finishing his freshman year at Glendora High in 2011, he began building a model of Angel Stadium, a place he often frequented with his parents, Ray and Lorelei, and older sister Chantel. When the model was completed in mid-August of that year, the Angels found out about it through intermediaries, and so did the Orange County Register. Next came photoshoots and interview sessions, first at the newspaper office and then the stadium. At the stadium, Brett and his model were stationed near the front gate and fans came by to marvel at everything from the center field’s rock pile to an iPod-animated video board. An in-depth feature story on Brett and his model-making skills ran on the front page of the Register’s sports section on Aug. 22, 2011. Brett’s parents say that story, written by former staff writer and columnist Marcia Smith, inspired their son. So did a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) architecture class at Glendora High. Over the past eight years, Brett, now 24, has built, by his estimation, around 100 more models. Most, but not all, are replicas of sports stadiums. He has stored many of them away, given some away and sold a few. Brett, also a hockey fan, made an actual-size model of the Stanley Cup after the Kings won it in 2012, and fastidiously hand-engraved every name from the winning-team rosters, dating back to 1893. It took him several months. “His hands kept getting tired,” Lorelei says. He also built a model of Staples Center, inside and out. In 2016 he spent four months building a six-foot long model of Manhattan, complete with more than 600 buildings, many of them skyscrapers. More recently, his projects have included a model of Dodger Stadium, one of the Rams’ new stadium under construction in Inglewood, and a much more elaborate model of Yankee Stadium than the one he built at age 15 in 2010. His crowning achievement, which was in the works on and off for the past two years, is now completed. It is a huge (39×57-inch) model of Dodgertown, the storied baseball spring training camp located in Vero Beach, Fla., as it appeared in the mid-1950s. The Dodgers trained there for 61 years, from 1948 to 2008, before the team moved its spring training site to Glendale, Ariz. Highlights of the model include Holman Stadium, three other baseball diamonds, the original barracks that remained from a former U.S. Naval Air Station, and a drainage canal that cuts through the middle of the site. This model project was commissioned by Peter O’Malley, who became Dodger president in 1970 and sold the team to Rupert Murdoch and his News Corporation in 1998. These days, O’Malley maintains a downtown L.A. office and, for the past seven years, has served as chairman of what is known as “Historic Dodgertown.” He was responsible for restoring the Vero Beach site which is now a multi-sport center featuring 10 baseball fields. Major League Baseball, the new lessee, renamed it the “Jackie Robinson Training Complex” in April. Brett remembers the date of his first visit to O’Malley’s office – May 23, 2017. It turned out to be a lot more than just a visit. Brett showed O’Malley a photo of his Dodger Stadium model, and that afternoon Brett received an email from Brent Shyer, O’Malley’s right-hand man, asking if he would consider building a model of Dodgertown, using old photos from their files. Brett and his family were excited, to say the least. “That email brought tears,” Lorelei says. Brett soon went to work, coordinating the project along the way with O’Malley, Shyer and office mates Robert Schweppe and Adam King. The completed model is a real work of art with every little detail meticulously placed so that everything appears exactly as Dodgertown did in the mid-1950s. Model maker, but also a role model But this story isn’t about a model. It is about a model maker. Brett Pevey has a genetic disorder known as 22q 11.2 Deletion syndrome, or simply 22q. It’s also known as DiGeorge syndrome and a few more complicated names. Never heard of it? You’re not alone. It is a disorder caused by a small missing piece of the 22nd chromosome, and that tiny missing portion can affect every system in the human body. It can be the cause of nearly 200 mild to serious health and developmental issues in children and is believed to be the second most common genetic disorder behind Down’s syndrome. For the Register story on Brett that ran in 2011, his parents chose not to mention 22q or delve into any aspect of that – and for good reason. Brett, then 16, was not fully aware of his medical condition or even that he had one. He only knew he struggled academically in school, took special education classes and had a heart condition that required two open-heart surgeries. He remembers only the second one. The first came when he was only three months old. If you were to meet him, you likely would not realize Brett has a disability. He is a 5-foot-8, 160-pound young man who is exceedingly polite and well versed in talking about his models, baseball and other topics that interest him. “After he showed me that photo of his Dodger Stadium model, all I knew was this young man has a lot of talent,” O’Malley said during a recent photo shoot. “That same day was the first time I ever thought about having anyone make a model of Dodgertown, and I asked Brent (Shyer) to email Brett.” O’Malley now marvels at the final product, which the Peveys carefully transported to his office in their SUV two weeks prior to the recent photoshoot. At the photoshoot, O’Malley for the first time noticed eight very tiny model cars in the parking lot in the front the Dodgertown barracks. “I researched to find out what were popular car colors in the 1950’s,” Brett explained. “That’s amazing,” O’Malley said. Asked what impressed him most about the Dodgertown model, O’Malley said: “Brett, with his model a close second. He is a genius . . . and a superstar.” O’Malley’s plan is to somehow get the model to Vero Beach. “Not sure how we will get it there, but that is where it belongs,” he said. Brett’s heart condition limits his activities, but he was on the junior varsity golf team at Glendora High. He was permitted to use a pushcart, rather than being required to carry his golf bag. He said his best score was a one-over-par 37 over nine holes at Marshall Canyon Golf Course in La Verne. In high school golf, they play only nine holes. Brett’s parents are now willing to talk about their son having 22q and the challenges that come with it because they want to show others what can be accomplished by someone with a learning disability. They are proud of their son’s abilities. They embrace them and support them, making countless trips to supply stores. Brett’s model-building ability is called a “splinter skill.” Children and adults with at least one splinter skill are generally referred to as a savant, meaning they can do one or more things out of the ordinary, usually involving music, math, or memory. The Dustin Hoffman character, Raymond Babbitt, in the movie “Rain Man” was a savant. But Brett Pevey is no Raymond Babbitt. During a three-hour-plus afternoon interview session at the Peveys’ Glendora home, Brett talked freely and showed a sense of humor. On one occasion, his father was going through some of his son’s medical difficulties when Brett noted, “My dad is the medical nerd here, I’m the model stadium nerd.” The only time Brett had trouble finding the right words was when he was asked how satisfying it is for him to be able to help others. In other words, to be role model as well as a model maker. “It makes me happy,” he said. Brett’s medical problems began at birth. He was born in 1995 with truncus arteriosus, a rare and critical congenital heart defect. A delicate operation was necessary. It was performed at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles by Dr. Vaughn Starnes, a nationally known cardiac surgeon who specializes in congenital heart surgery. At the time, this type of surgery Brett needed had been successful only once before, meaning Brett became only the second survivor. And he almost didn’t make it. “I don’t know if Brett even knows this, but his heart stopped five times on the operating table,” Lorelei said during the interview session in the family room of their home. This got Brett’s attention. “You mean I almost died; I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a smile. Added Ray: “Nitric oxide saved his life.” It lowered the high blood pressure that was stopping the heart. A second open-heart surgery was required in 2003, when Brett was 8, to upgrade a vessel that was put in place in 1995. That operation, also performed by Dr. Starnes, went well, and Brett was home after only two days at Children’s Hospital. After the first surgery, there were some tough times. Various complications required at least a half-dozen surgeries. “I remember that at one point the number of surgeries was higher than his age,” Lorelei said. Through those early years, Brett was slow to develop in such areas as walking, speech, and social skills. And there was no diagnosis. It wasn’t until Brett was 9 that, through a complex blood test, Dr. David Geller at Children’s Hospital concluded he had 22q. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]“It took three months for us to get results from that blood test,” Lorelei said. “The first thing I was told was that he had velo-cardio-facial-syndrome. I said, ‘What is that?’ ” Because 22q can cause as many as 180 different symptoms, it often goes undiagnosed. This leads many to believe the syndrome is much more common than statistics indicate. The latest figure is that 1 in 3,000 children are born with 22q, but many believe that is a gross underestimation. The Peveys pointed out that there is a website, 22qfamilyfoundation.org, that can be helpful to parents facing the same issues they have faced for the past 24 years. The Peveys readily admit difficulties remain. But they also want people to know that there is a light at the end of the tunnel, and that they are grateful that their son is happy because he is doing something he loves, something that he is extraordinarily qualified to do, and something that gives him a great feeling of pride. Editor’s note: Longtime sportswriter Larry Stewart played a role in the story in addition to writing it. As a friend of Ray Pevey, Stewart helped make an introduction to Peter O’Malley in 2017. RELATED: Kid builds Angel Stadium from scratch
25 Jun 19
To Boldly Go Alone

How’s your week going? I’ve been thinking a lot about vacations lately. Maybe, because I feel trapped thanks to my mobility issues and lack of money. When I get my SSDI(trying to think positive) I am going to go on a vacation. I haven’t decided where yet. But I got to thinking about how to […]

25 Jun 19
St. Lucia Times News

Press Release:– It was a weekend full of intense swimming as Six (6) teams came out to participate in the 05th annual Karen Beaubrun Memorial swim meet 2019. Sharks swim club, Lightning Aquatics Swim Club, RR Aquatics Swim club, Southern Flying Fish Swim Club and RHAC Swim Club participated in this year’s competition with Seajays legends […]

25 Jun 19
NatureCoaster.com

CCA Florida, the state’s leading organization dedicated to marine fisheries conservation, education, and advocacy, shared details today on the first winner in the CCA Florida STAR competition, presented by Yamaha.  The registered angler, Clifford Herring from Hudson, Florida, will walk away with a $48,000+ prize package from Conley Buick GMC of Bradenton, Florida.  Herring is […]

25 Jun 19
High Velocity Sport

Women’s World Cup 2019: Netherlands knock out Japan with last-mintue penalty https://ift.tt/2IJv2tF Lieke Martens’ last-minute penalty sends Netherlands through to the quarter-finals in a breathless match against Japan in Rennes. Soccer News via BBC Sport – Football https://bbc.in/OHg7x6 June 25, 2019 at 02:12PM