Squier

23 Apr 19
SURFADELIC

  Though they never received the recognition they deserved, Squire was undoubtedly one of the earliest and finest Mod Revival bands of the late 70s. Squire were able to transcend the limits of the genre with their high quality pop which drew equal parts from punk spirit and the 1960s. Named because they rehearsed above […]

21 Apr 19
Saddlebagsally

Golden Rock Music & Golden Years of Rock Music Chicago, The Kinks, The Doors, Toto, Blondie, The Turtles Cream , Santana, The Pretenders, Dire Straits, The Greg Kihn Band… The Best of Rock of the 60s, 70s, 80s, Classic Rock Greatest Hits Rock Clásicos Universales , 3 Décadas de Rock Vol. 3 SoundMix Dj【ツ】Classic Rock […]

21 Apr 19
destroyerofharmony

If you are curious here are parts one, two, three and four of the 1984 series. Pretty Maids – Red Hot And Heavy I didn’t hear this album until the early two thousands. I had “Future World” on LP, however any other release by the band was available via an expensive IMPORT price of $50 […]

20 Apr 19
Redwood Times
The Minnesota float featured a can of Spam. The Wisconsin float featured both some cheese and a Green Bay Packers helmet. The state of Washington float was pulled by a John Deere tractor. All this as nearly 90 fifth-grade students from three classrooms at Cutten School held their annual float parade, featuring 49 of the 50 states in the union. The parade was the culmination of about two months of work done by the students who each chose a state to focus on and learn about except California, which is the focus of the fourth-grade classes. The goal is for the students to perform their own research and then build a mini-float featuring the attributes each state possesses. “A lot of hard work went into this,” said fifth-grade teacher Tracy Benbow as she tapped each student on the shoulder with the tip of an American flag to signal for them to join the parade. “The kids have researched the states they chose back at the beginning of February. They have created a state float using shoeboxes.” The students paraded their floats in front of dozens of parents as well as the rest of the student body in third, fourth and sixth grades. It was the sixth-graders who were on parade a year ago and they kept a keen eye out for the state they had chosen. Fourth-graders will get their chance next year and, as Benbow put it, it’s a revolving cycle. The students not only research information about the states through books and online resources, but they also sent out letters to gather information about their particular state. The project is one that encourages family participation and much of the building of the floats was done at home. “My class wrote 29 business letters to departments of commerce and out of 29, 25 responded,” Benbow said. “They got a lot of great items like maps and other materials from the states they mailed. They love the idea they get to create with their hands and this is a project they get to complete at home where they could use materials they found around the house.” Cutten Elementary School fifth-graders pull their floats on Friday. (Shaun Walker — The Times-Standard) Nearly all of the 49 states that could be chosen were on display and some of the displays were intricately done. One of the Massachusetts floats featured a model of the Mayflower while a tiny Paul Revere figurine on a horse warned of the oncoming Redcoats. One North Carolina float featured cotton, dogwood flowers and a plane in honor of the Wright Brothers, while Mardi Gras beads and a figure playing the saxophone were featured on a float for Louisiana. For Tyler Hinrichs, a fifth-grader, Texas was the state he chose to feature and he did so because it’s a place he wants to visit one day, so what better way to learn about that than research the state for the parade? “The sculpting and making the float, designing it and learning what Texas is about is what I liked and I added Longhorns to mine,” Hinrichs said as a light drizzle fell across the basketball court at the school. “The Mockingbird is the state bird of Texas and I just want to really visit Texas so I chose it to learn about and see what’s there and what there is to do.” For principal Lauren Bryie, the parade and the work that goes into building the floats is a good way to make learning fun and it’s also a great way to spark curiosity about other places. “For the last month or so, the students have been learning about their state and many wrote to the states for information,” Bryie said. “They spend a lot of time learning about the state, the state bird, the flag, and over the course of that month, they also work at home. The parents give a lot of support and guidance.” Cutten Elementary School fifth-graders Makenna McNamara, left, and Burke Morrow, both 11, talk after the parade on Friday. (Shaun Walker — The Times-Standard) The student body lined up along the walls as the parade wound its way past various classrooms before making a sharp right turn where they paraded past the cheering and clapping third-graders. The fun of the parade and the hands-on learning provides a win-win situation for all involved. “A lot of these kids are fortunate to have visited the states they chose,” Benbow said. “There was a lot of research involved, a lot of information from books and online went into this, and it’s a great way for them to learn about a new place.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Apr 19
Times-Standard
The Minnesota float featured a can of Spam. The Wisconsin float featured both some cheese and a Green Bay Packers helmet. The state of Washington float was pulled by a John Deere tractor. All this as nearly 90 fifth-grade students from three classrooms at Cutten School held their annual float parade, featuring 49 of the 50 states in the union. The parade was the culmination of about two months of work done by the students who each chose a state to focus on and learn about except California, which is the focus of the fourth-grade classes. The goal is for the students to perform their own research and then build a mini-float featuring the attributes each state possesses. “A lot of hard work went into this,” said fifth-grade teacher Tracy Benbow as she tapped each student on the shoulder with the tip of an American flag to signal for them to join the parade. “The kids have researched the states they chose back at the beginning of February. They have created a state float using shoeboxes.” The students paraded their floats in front of dozens of parents as well as the rest of the student body in third, fourth and sixth grades. It was the sixth-graders who were on parade a year ago and they kept a keen eye out for the state they had chosen. Fourth-graders will get their chance next year and, as Benbow put it, it’s a revolving cycle. The students not only research information about the states through books and online resources, but they also sent out letters to gather information about their particular state. The project is one that encourages family participation and much of the building of the floats was done at home. “My class wrote 29 business letters to departments of commerce and out of 29, 25 responded,” Benbow said. “They got a lot of great items like maps and other materials from the states they mailed. They love the idea they get to create with their hands and this is a project they get to complete at home where they could use materials they found around the house.” Cutten Elementary School fifth-graders pull their floats on Friday. (Shaun Walker — The Times-Standard) Nearly all of the 49 states that could be chosen were on display and some of the displays were intricately done. One of the Massachusetts floats featured a model of the Mayflower while a tiny Paul Revere figurine on a horse warned of the oncoming Redcoats. One North Carolina float featured cotton, dogwood flowers and a plane in honor of the Wright Brothers, while Mardi Gras beads and a figure playing the saxophone were featured on a float for Louisiana. For Tyler Hinrichs, a fifth-grader, Texas was the state he chose to feature and he did so because it’s a place he wants to visit one day, so what better way to learn about that than research the state for the parade? “The sculpting and making the float, designing it and learning what Texas is about is what I liked and I added Longhorns to mine,” Hinrichs said as a light drizzle fell across the basketball court at the school. “The Mockingbird is the state bird of Texas and I just want to really visit Texas so I chose it to learn about and see what’s there and what there is to do.” For principal Lauren Bryie, the parade and the work that goes into building the floats is a good way to make learning fun and it’s also a great way to spark curiosity about other places. “For the last month or so, the students have been learning about their state and many wrote to the states for information,” Bryie said. “They spend a lot of time learning about the state, the state bird, the flag, and over the course of that month, they also work at home. The parents give a lot of support and guidance.” Cutten Elementary School fifth-graders Makenna McNamara, left, and Burke Morrow, both 11, talk after the parade on Friday. (Shaun Walker — The Times-Standard) The student body lined up along the walls as the parade wound its way past various classrooms before making a sharp right turn where they paraded past the cheering and clapping third-graders. The fun of the parade and the hands-on learning provides a win-win situation for all involved. “A lot of these kids are fortunate to have visited the states they chose,” Benbow said. “There was a lot of research involved, a lot of information from books and online went into this, and it’s a great way for them to learn about a new place.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Apr 19
Redwood Times
The Save the Internet Act, a net neutrality bill co-sponsored by North Coast U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman passed out of the House and is headed for the Senate for consideration. The bill, HR 1644, is an effort to restore protections for net neutrality that were implemented in 2015 and then rescinded by the Trump administration in 2017. Ensuring protections for consumer privacy rules preventing telecom corporations from slowing down or controlling what information is available over their networks is the impetus behind the bill and the impact locally will be felt by private citizens, business owners and local governments. McLaughlin For residents of Humboldt County and the North Coast where internet service is limited and back-up broadband connections are still not completed, rules preventing telecoms from limiting access to the internet are crucial, according to one local proponent. “We are at the thin edge of internet access and we often have no choice in provider,” said Sean McLaughlin, executive director at Access Humboldt. “The notion that you may want another provider doesn’t work in rural areas where you don’t have any choice and an open internet becomes much more important.” McLaughlin went on to point out that the need for consumer protections, and not just protections for privacy, but protections for access, are the key to a free and open resource that was created and developed with public funds. If net neutrality is diluted or repealed, telecoms will have the power to restrict what you can read and watch online and would allow them to focus on content that makes them money rather than what the consumer wants to see, he said. “The thing about net neutrality is that without it, the network owner will monetize content by making some content faster or (more) accessible and have you pay extra for other content,” he said. “We already see this with local satellite TV subscribers who can’t watch two local TV stations. If you apply that model to the internet that’s what it will look like; some stations won’t be available. Maybe you’ll have to pay extra to watch a Board of Supervisors meeting. That’s why we like to talk about it in general terms. The internet has become the backbone of our phone and communications system and in rural areas like Humboldt County people don’t have a choice in provider and it’s like wiping out mom-and-pop stores for corporate franchises.” Huffman According to both McLaughlin and U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman, the feedback from citizens across the country is overwhelmingly in favor of net neutrality. The internet was developed and built with public funds and in 2015 it was classified as a public utility, a designation since removed by the Trump Administration. “I think that is an essential part of the conversation and something most people don’t know or appreciate,” Huffman said on Friday. “The public developed this resource and it should come as no surprise that huge corporations are trying ways to monetize and restrict access. It’s our job to say, ‘Enough,’ and to say, ‘No.’” Huffman said he is hopeful that the resolution will make it through the Senate because it’s one of the few national issues that has wide-ranging bi-partisan support. “In the big picture, it’s a critical crossroad in what the internet looks like,” Huffman added. “Will it remain the open resource for everyone to use or will a few powerful players limit access, throttle and control ways that are expensive and discriminatory? The Senate passed a bi-partisan bill to protect net neutrality and the representatives I have spoken with say, without exception, this is a winning issue.” Among the provisions of the House resolution are calls for strengthening transparency protections; enacting specific rules against blocking, throttling and paid prioritization; and empowering the FCC to investigate consumer and business complaints and fine internet service providers for violations of the Communications Act. Huffman said net neutrality is critical locally. “On the North Coast of California, I’ve seen firsthand how our rural communities, who already have limited access to reliable broadband, depend on net neutrality,” Huffman said. “A free and open internet is essential for telehealth, education, and economic growth, and I’m glad the House voted to support net neutrality.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Apr 19
Times-Standard
The Save the Internet Act, a net neutrality bill co-sponsored by North Coast U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman passed out of the House and is headed for the Senate for consideration. The bill, HR 1644, is an effort to restore protections for net neutrality that were implemented in 2015 and then rescinded by the Trump administration in 2017. Ensuring protections for consumer privacy rules preventing telecom corporations from slowing down or controlling what information is available over their networks is the impetus behind the bill and the impact locally will be felt by private citizens, business owners and local governments. McLaughlin For residents of Humboldt County and the North Coast where internet service is limited and back-up broadband connections are still not completed, rules preventing telecoms from limiting access to the internet are crucial, according to one local proponent. “We are at the thin edge of internet access and we often have no choice in provider,” said Sean McLaughlin, executive director at Access Humboldt. “The notion that you may want another provider doesn’t work in rural areas where you don’t have any choice and an open internet becomes much more important.” McLaughlin went on to point out that the need for consumer protections, and not just protections for privacy, but protections for access, are the key to a free and open resource that was created and developed with public funds. If net neutrality is diluted or repealed, telecoms will have the power to restrict what you can read and watch online and would allow them to focus on content that makes them money rather than what the consumer wants to see, he said. “The thing about net neutrality is that without it, the network owner will monetize content by making some content faster or (more) accessible and have you pay extra for other content,” he said. “We already see this with local satellite TV subscribers who can’t watch two local TV stations. If you apply that model to the internet that’s what it will look like; some stations won’t be available. Maybe you’ll have to pay extra to watch a Board of Supervisors meeting. That’s why we like to talk about it in general terms. The internet has become the backbone of our phone and communications system and in rural areas like Humboldt County people don’t have a choice in provider and it’s like wiping out mom-and-pop stores for corporate franchises.” Huffman According to both McLaughlin and U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman, the feedback from citizens across the country is overwhelmingly in favor of net neutrality. The internet was developed and built with public funds and in 2015 it was classified as a public utility, a designation since removed by the Trump Administration. “I think that is an essential part of the conversation and something most people don’t know or appreciate,” Huffman said on Friday. “The public developed this resource and it should come as no surprise that huge corporations are trying ways to monetize and restrict access. It’s our job to say, ‘Enough,’ and to say, ‘No.'” Huffman said he is hopeful that the resolution will make it through the Senate because it’s one of the few national issues that has wide-ranging bi-partisan support. “In the big picture, it’s a critical crossroad in what the internet looks like,” Huffman added. “Will it remain the open resource for everyone to use or will a few powerful players limit access, throttle and control ways that are expensive and discriminatory? The Senate passed a bi-partisan bill to protect net neutrality and the representatives I have spoken with say, without exception, this is a winning issue.” Among the provisions of the House resolution are calls for strengthening transparency protections; enacting specific rules against blocking, throttling and paid prioritization; and empowering the FCC to investigate consumer and business complaints and fine internet service providers for violations of the Communications Act. Huffman said net neutrality is critical locally. “On the North Coast of California, I’ve seen firsthand how our rural communities, who already have limited access to reliable broadband, depend on net neutrality,” Huffman said. “A free and open internet is essential for telehealth, education, and economic growth, and I’m glad the House voted to support net neutrality.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
19 Apr 19
Access Genealogy

A complete listing of all available online Dukes County Massachusetts cemeteries, with links to multiple cemetery transcriptions, gravestone photos, tombstone photos, official records, etc.

19 Apr 19
Redwood Times
A woman who pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity related to the death of her infant daughter in 2016 has been ordered to a state hospital for further treatment. Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Christopher Wilson ruled Thursday that Ewa Misztal, 31, must be returned to the custody of Napa State Hospital. He based his ruling on a previous finding made by retired Judge Dale Reinholtsen, who found Misztal had not fully recovered from her mental illness. Wilson followed the last recommendation put forth from CONREP — a program that treats patients with mental disorders related to legal issues, including those deemed not guilty by reason of insanity — that Misztal be committed to treatment at the state hospital. He cited the agency’s responsibility to protect the public as the primary reason. Misztal “Certainly there is a desire to put together some local program,” Wilson said during his ruling. “What I see from CONREP is a legal obligation to supervise people who have committed offenses of a very serious nature. It’s a legal obligation. They have programs to provide that supervision and I have to respect their recommendations.” The ruling came in contrast to repeated arguments from Misztal’s defense attorney, Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo, that Misztal had recovered sufficiently to be treated locally, where she has a support system. “I think this decision reflects, in my mind, one of the failures of our mental health system,” Russo said following the hearing. “It comes down to a lack of local resources the court can immediately point to. We have a county mental health system. We have a county probation department and they are connected to the state hospital and (CONREP) has the ability to use these (local) agencies as designees; it just hasn’t been done.” Russo argued over the course of several hearings that Misztal has not shown any signs of mental illness and that sending her to the state hospital for treatment will only delay her full recovery. “She’ll be sent to the state hospital for a minimum of 180 days, what they call an observational period,” Russo said. “After the 180 days, either CONREP can recommend she be released to an outpatient program or we can petition the court given how well she has been doing and we fully intend to. Obviously, we believe that outpatient treatment was the appropriate course and Ms. Misztal would do perfectly well in outpatient treatment.” While the defense did not agree with the ruling, the prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Carolyn Schaffer argued the judge’s decision was made in accordance with state law. Schaffer said the law is clear in that if no suitable outpatient treatment is available Misztal must be committed for at least 180 days. “No suitable program has been found,” Schaffer argued. “It seems to me that due to the absence of any program, the court needs to commit the defendant to the state hospital.” Following the short hearing, Schaffer said Wilson had little other option than to send Misztal back for more treatment. “I think he ruled according to the options he had available to him under the law,” she said. Misztal appeared in court in custody wearing a jail-issued jumpsuit and she conferred quietly with Russo before the hearing began. She was arrested in August 2016 and charged with felony assault that resulted in the death of her 7-month-old daughter. Following evaluations from two psychiatrists, Misztal was found not guilty by reason of insanity and it’s on that finding that Russo has based all of his ensuing arguments about where she can get the best treatment for her mental illness. “Obviously there are limited resources, a lack of funding and the fact we only have one CONREP representative who is in Sacramento, all of those things make it difficult because there is no program readily available,” Russo said, adding that he has gotten no response from CONREP about developing a local treatment program. “It requires a lot of time and money and effort to put together a program and, unfortunately, I think it’s seen by these agencies and it’s easier to send her to a state hospital. In my opinion, that’s why (CONREP) made that decision as opposed to an honest evaluation.” Wilson ordered Misztal to be turned over to the custody of the state hospital on May 8. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
19 Apr 19
Times-Standard
A woman who pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity related to the death of her infant daughter in 2016 has been ordered to a state hospital for further treatment. Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Christopher Wilson ruled Thursday that Ewa Misztal, 31, must be returned to the custody of Napa State Hospital. He based his ruling on a previous finding made by retired Judge Dale Reinholtsen, who found Misztal had not fully recovered from her mental illness. Wilson followed the last recommendation put forth from CONREP — a program that treats patients with mental disorders related to legal issues, including those deemed not guilty by reason of insanity — that Misztal be committed to treatment at the state hospital. He cited the agency’s responsibility to protect the public as the primary reason. Misztal “Certainly there is a desire to put together some local program,” Wilson said during his ruling. “What I see from CONREP is a legal obligation to supervise people who have committed offenses of a very serious nature. It’s a legal obligation. They have programs to provide that supervision and I have to respect their recommendations.” The ruling came in contrast to repeated arguments from Misztal’s defense attorney, Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo, that Misztal had recovered sufficiently to be treated locally, where she has a support system. “I think this decision reflects, in my mind, one of the failures of our mental health system,” Russo said following the hearing. “It comes down to a lack of local resources the court can immediately point to. We have a county mental health system. We have a county probation department and they are connected to the state hospital and (CONREP) has the ability to use these (local) agencies as designees; it just hasn’t been done.” Russo argued over the course of several hearings that Misztal has not shown any signs of mental illness and that sending her to the state hospital for treatment will only delay her full recovery. “She’ll be sent to the state hospital for a minimum of 180 days, what they call an observational period,” Russo said. “After the 180 days, either CONREP can recommend she be released to an outpatient program or we can petition the court given how well she has been doing and we fully intend to. Obviously, we believe that outpatient treatment was the appropriate course and Ms. Misztal would do perfectly well in outpatient treatment.” While the defense did not agree with the ruling, the prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Carolyn Schaffer argued the judge’s decision was made in accordance with state law. Schaffer said the law is clear in that if no suitable outpatient treatment is available Misztal must be committed for at least 180 days. “No suitable program has been found,” Schaffer argued. “It seems to me that due to the absence of any program, the court needs to commit the defendant to the state hospital.” Following the short hearing, Schaffer said Wilson had little other option than to send Misztal back for more treatment. “I think he ruled according to the options he had available to him under the law,” she said. Misztal appeared in court in custody wearing a jail-issued jumpsuit and she conferred quietly with Russo before the hearing began. She was arrested in August 2016 and charged with felony assault that resulted in the death of her 7-month-old daughter. Following evaluations from two psychiatrists, Misztal was found not guilty by reason of insanity and it’s on that finding that Russo has based all of his ensuing arguments about where she can get the best treatment for her mental illness. “Obviously there are limited resources, a lack of funding and the fact we only have one CONREP representative who is in Sacramento, all of those things make it difficult because there is no program readily available,” Russo said, adding that he has gotten no response from CONREP about developing a local treatment program. “It requires a lot of time and money and effort to put together a program and, unfortunately, I think it’s seen by these agencies and it’s easier to send her to a state hospital. In my opinion, that’s why (CONREP) made that decision as opposed to an honest evaluation.” Wilson ordered Misztal to be turned over to the custody of the state hospital on May 8. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
19 Apr 19
Redwood Times
North Coast state legislators past and present signed their names to a sternly worded letter addressed to California State University Chancellor’s Office regarding the drastic cuts to KHSU. The letter addressed to Chancellor Timothy White was signed by state Sen. Mike McGuire, Assemblyman Jim Wood and former lawmakers Wes Chesbro and Patti Berg. It outlined several requests of White, including “that any further decisions by the next administration be made with community transparency and respect.” At issue was the decision by the administration at Humboldt State University to cease any direct funding from HSU, eliminate five staff positions as well as the positions of General Manager and Chief Engineer, suspend indefinitely volunteer-run programs and require that the appointment of any interim station director be supported through non-HSU funding. “Major decisions made behind closed doors, with zero transparency, simply do not work for this community,” the letter stated. “It hurts the credibility of the university and makes everyone’s job harder. There was absolutely no reason for this situation to unfold as it has and we want it to stop.” The letter criticizes the manner in which the HSU administration went about making the cuts, the presence of police on scene, and the lack of notice given to volunteers and staff and to the listeners who support the station. “Just last weekend, KHSU concluded a successful community fundraising drive, where local businesses and residents put their priorities and names on the line to support the station and their award-winning programming,” stated the letter. “The reckless manner and timing of HSU shutting down this amazing station could not have been worse and it’s time for the long-term decision making by a short-term administration to stop.” The Chancellor’s Office has received the letter, a spokesman for the office confirmed Thursday. “The Chancellor’s Office is in receipt of the letter you have referenced and we plan on engaging the legislators in the very near future to discuss their concerns,” spokesman Michael Uhlenkamp said in an email to the Times-Standard. The HSU administration did not have an official reply to requests for comment and instead referred to the news release issued by the school last week announcing the cuts and changes. “The changes are intended to address operational challenges at KHSU, prevent further negative impact to the University’s budget, and better align HSU’s financial support with its mission and with opportunities for students,” read the statement. On Thursday, Frank Whitlatch, a university spokesman, responded to questions sent by email. He reiterated the station remains open and has not been closed despite the cuts to staff and volunteers. “The station is not closed. There are discussions underway to collaborate with other partners,” Whitlatch wrote. “HSU has many discussions with potential collaborators, and in many cases, those discussions do not lead to anything. Our practice is to not share details of these types of discussions prior to some type of agreement being reached.” Whitlatch also said there are no plans to sell the broadcasting license under which KHSU operates. He added it was not practicable to notify staff, volunteers and the public ahead of the final decision. “At a practical level, that information would have been shared publicly shortly after notifying the employees or volunteers, so it would not have been possible to notify them well in advance,” Whitlatch said. Assemblymember Jim Wood issued a short statement in response to an email request for comment. “Our formal requests, in response to the recent actions by the departing HSU administration, are to ensure that the new administration, along with listening to community input, make all decisions going forward about what happens next for KHSU and for that process to be totally transparent,” he said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Those sentiments were echoed by McGuire who was in Crescent City on Wednesday afternoon. “For generations, the people of Humboldt County and the North Coast have relied on KHSU for news and views from across the North Coast and across the world,” McGuire said by phone. “The bottom line is this: Major decisions such as effectively shutting down KHSU behind closed doors with zero transparency doesn’t work for the community and the way it’s been handled hurts the credibility of the university. In particular, it makes the incoming president’s job even more difficult. Any further decisions focused on KHSU should be made by the next administration and in partnership with the community.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
19 Apr 19
Times-Standard
North Coast state legislators past and present signed their names to a sternly worded letter addressed to California State University Chancellor’s Office regarding the drastic cuts to KHSU. The letter addressed to Chancellor Timothy White was signed by state Sen. Mike McGuire, Assemblyman Jim Wood and former lawmakers Wes Chesbro and Patti Berg. It outlined several requests of White, including “that any further decisions by the next administration be made with community transparency and respect.” At issue was the decision by the administration at Humboldt State University to cease any direct funding from HSU, eliminate five staff positions as well as the positions of General Manager and Chief Engineer, suspend indefinitely volunteer-run programs and require that the appointment of any interim station director be supported through non-HSU funding. “Major decisions made behind closed doors, with zero transparency, simply do not work for this community,” the letter stated. “It hurts the credibility of the university and makes everyone’s job harder. There was absolutely no reason for this situation to unfold as it has and we want it to stop.” The letter criticizes the manner in which the HSU administration went about making the cuts, the presence of police on scene, and the lack of notice given to volunteers and staff and to the listeners who support the station. “Just last weekend, KHSU concluded a successful community fundraising drive, where local businesses and residents put their priorities and names on the line to support the station and their award-winning programming,” stated the letter. “The reckless manner and timing of HSU shutting down this amazing station could not have been worse and it’s time for the long-term decision making by a short-term administration to stop.” The Chancellor’s Office has received the letter, a spokesman for the office confirmed Thursday. “The Chancellor’s Office is in receipt of the letter you have referenced and we plan on engaging the legislators in the very near future to discuss their concerns,” spokesman Michael Uhlenkamp said in an email to the Times-Standard. The HSU administration did not have an official reply to requests for comment and instead referred to the news release issued by the school last week announcing the cuts and changes. “The changes are intended to address operational challenges at KHSU, prevent further negative impact to the University’s budget, and better align HSU’s financial support with its mission and with opportunities for students,” read the statement. On Thursday, Frank Whitlatch, a university spokesman, responded to questions sent by email. He reiterated the station remains open and has not been closed despite the cuts to staff and volunteers. “The station is not closed. There are discussions underway to collaborate with other partners,” Whitlatch wrote. “HSU has many discussions with potential collaborators, and in many cases, those discussions do not lead to anything. Our practice is to not share details of these types of discussions prior to some type of agreement being reached.” Whitlatch also said there are no plans to sell the broadcasting license under which KHSU operates. He added it was not practicable to notify staff, volunteers and the public ahead of the final decision. “At a practical level, that information would have been shared publicly shortly after notifying the employees or volunteers, so it would not have been possible to notify them well in advance,” Whitlatch said. Assemblymember Jim Wood issued a short statement in response to an email request for comment. “Our formal requests, in response to the recent actions by the departing HSU administration, are to ensure that the new administration, along with listening to community input, make all decisions going forward about what happens next for KHSU and for that process to be totally transparent,” he said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Those sentiments were echoed by McGuire who was in Crescent City on Wednesday afternoon. “For generations, the people of Humboldt County and the North Coast have relied on KHSU for news and views from across the North Coast and across the world,” McGuire said by phone. “The bottom line is this: Major decisions such as effectively shutting down KHSU behind closed doors with zero transparency doesn’t work for the community and the way it’s been handled hurts the credibility of the university. In particular, it makes the incoming president’s job even more difficult. Any further decisions focused on KHSU should be made by the next administration and in partnership with the community.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
18 Apr 19
The Amberson´s Mansion

If there’s one thing I like is old films. If there’s a second thing I like is films based on stage plays, or that resemble stage performances. If there’s a third thing I like is boldness and courage to assume one’s vision over something. Boy, did I like Warner Brothers’ 1936’s production of “The Petrified […]

18 Apr 19
Redwood Times
Dozens of personnel from agencies across the emergency response spectrum gathered at the Samoa Airfield on Wednesday morning to kick off two days of training in an effort to provide better mutual aid coordination in the time of an actual emergency. Personnel from local fire departments, state and federal parks, the state Office of Emergency Services, Cal Fire and the Coast Guard gathered at the airfield to practice over-land and over-water rescue techniques and to establish communications protocols to be used in the event of an emergency. The planning for the exercise began three months ago and it gives the agencies involved a chance to work together in a training environment instead of trying to coordinate at the scene of an actual emergency. The four members of one of two Coast Guard helicopter crews that staged for two days of training with other local agencies explain the equipment they use when out on a rescue mission on day one of the exercise, Wednesday. (Natalya Estrada — for the Times-Standard) “My goal is to identify weaknesses and where we have some challenges in communications and the different ways we operate,” said Capt. Greg Fuller, commander Sector Humboldt Bay. “We want to identify any issues before we have a big event or crisis. This gives us the chance to evaluate everyone’s weaknesses and strengths. The Coast Guard’s strengths may be we’re the experts over water and we have some inland experience. But some of our partner agencies are the absolute experts when it comes to inland rescue, so we can all gain something from this experience.” There were three helicopters parked at the airfield as the pre-exercise briefing was conducted by Cmdr. Brendan Hilleary, response department head at Sector Humboldt Bay, who outlined the training schedule for the next two days. Another Coast Guard helicopter arrived about an hour later as the gathered personnel split into two groups. One group consisted of the various aircrews. They held a pre-flight briefing on the tarmac while the firefighters, park rangers and water rescue personnel gathered by the various emergency apparatus — trucks, trailers, and watercraft — to familiarize themselves with the equipment on display. There were 12 agencies on hand. A key part of the exercise is not only to establish a rapport but to build trust between personnel in the air, on the ground or in the water. “This training is important because we have such a variety of terrain here,” Hilleary said. “You have the coast, the mountains and we don’t have that many resources available so it’s important we build that trust so that no matter who shows up at an incident, we can work effectively together and get the job done.” Water rescue personnel from state parks and local fire departments and the Coast Guard were present in addition to the aircrews. The rescue swimmers from the Coast Guard teamed up with the water rescue team at Humboldt Bay Fire for helicopter rescue evolutions over the bay along with rescue practice with boats. For the members of Humboldt Bay Fire, knowledge of water rescue operations is a must with Eureka sitting on the bay. “Our goal is to see how the different agencies operate with each other and get a better understanding of how different agencies and their helicopters operate,” said Capt. David Terry, coordinator of the department’s water rescue program. “We’ve got eight guys who will be in the water and we will work with the Coast Guard and their helicopter crews. Mutual aid is a big part of what we do and what we’re trying is to figure out how we can do that more fluently and efficiently.” Terry said the goal is to learn the techniques used by the partner agencies — how they pull a victim from the water and transfer them to a basket and then onto a boat or onto a helicopter hoist. The task on Wednesday was to practice that real-time with the involved agencies. “This is the first step to us doing more advanced operations in the future,” Terry said. “We’re most likely going to be the agency that makes first contact with a victim and we need to know how each agency performs from transferring a patient from our swimmers to their swimmers or to their helicopters and watercraft.” “Cooperation,” “communication,” “coordination” and “planning for training” were the keywords Wednesday. In an area with rugged and inaccessible terrain, having personnel from various agencies trained to respond and support each other is vital. “Some of the communications and how we talk to each other, which frequencies to use, it’s important we iron those out,” Fuller said. “We do things differently and different words and phrases mean different things to various agencies. It’s really important to work that out ahead of time. The other important piece of the training is when folks on the ground are talking to the helicopter crews. The helicopter has to trust the information they are getting and we have to establish that trust and this exercise builds that trust.” The training exercise will finish with the Coast Guard coordinating with ground units to do a cliff rescue evolution at Patrick’s Point on Thursday afternoon. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
18 Apr 19
Times-Standard
Dozens of personnel from agencies across the emergency response spectrum gathered at the Samoa Airfield on Wednesday morning to kick off two days of training in an effort to provide better mutual aid coordination in the time of an actual emergency. Personnel from local fire departments, state and federal parks, the state Office of Emergency Services, Cal Fire and the Coast Guard gathered at the airfield to practice over-land and over-water rescue techniques and to establish communications protocols to be used in the event of an emergency. The planning for the exercise began three months ago and it gives the agencies involved a chance to work together in a training environment instead of trying to coordinate at the scene of an actual emergency. The four members of one of two Coast Guard helicopter crews that staged for two days of training with other local agencies explain the equipment they use when out on a rescue mission on day one of the exercise, Wednesday. (Natalya Estrada — for the Times-Standard) “My goal is to identify weaknesses and where we have some challenges in communications and the different ways we operate,” said Capt. Greg Fuller, commander Sector Humboldt Bay. “We want to identify any issues before we have a big event or crisis. This gives us the chance to evaluate everyone’s weaknesses and strengths. The Coast Guard’s strengths may be we’re the experts over water and we have some inland experience. But some of our partner agencies are the absolute experts when it comes to inland rescue, so we can all gain something from this experience.” There were three helicopters parked at the airfield as the pre-exercise briefing was conducted by Cmdr. Brendan Hilleary, response department head at Sector Humboldt Bay, who outlined the training schedule for the next two days. Another Coast Guard helicopter arrived about an hour later as the gathered personnel split into two groups. One group consisted of the various aircrews. They held a pre-flight briefing on the tarmac while the firefighters, park rangers and water rescue personnel gathered by the various emergency apparatus — trucks, trailers, and watercraft — to familiarize themselves with the equipment on display. There were 12 agencies on hand. A key part of the exercise is not only to establish a rapport but to build trust between personnel in the air, on the ground or in the water. “This training is important because we have such a variety of terrain here,” Hilleary said. “You have the coast, the mountains and we don’t have that many resources available so it’s important we build that trust so that no matter who shows up at an incident, we can work effectively together and get the job done.” Water rescue personnel from state parks and local fire departments and the Coast Guard were present in addition to the aircrews. The rescue swimmers from the Coast Guard teamed up with the water rescue team at Humboldt Bay Fire for helicopter rescue evolutions over the bay along with rescue practice with boats. For the members of Humboldt Bay Fire, knowledge of water rescue operations is a must with Eureka sitting on the bay. “Our goal is to see how the different agencies operate with each other and get a better understanding of how different agencies and their helicopters operate,” said Capt. David Terry, coordinator of the department’s water rescue program. “We’ve got eight guys who will be in the water and we will work with the Coast Guard and their helicopter crews. Mutual aid is a big part of what we do and what we’re trying is to figure out how we can do that more fluently and efficiently.” Terry said the goal is to learn the techniques used by the partner agencies — how they pull a victim from the water and transfer them to a basket and then onto a boat or onto a helicopter hoist. The task on Wednesday was to practice that real-time with the involved agencies. “This is the first step to us doing more advanced operations in the future,” Terry said. “We’re most likely going to be the agency that makes first contact with a victim and we need to know how each agency performs from transferring a patient from our swimmers to their swimmers or to their helicopters and watercraft.” “Cooperation,” “communication,” “coordination” and “planning for training” were the keywords Wednesday. In an area with rugged and inaccessible terrain, having personnel from various agencies trained to respond and support each other is vital. “Some of the communications and how we talk to each other, which frequencies to use, it’s important we iron those out,” Fuller said. “We do things differently and different words and phrases mean different things to various agencies. It’s really important to work that out ahead of time. The other important piece of the training is when folks on the ground are talking to the helicopter crews. The helicopter has to trust the information they are getting and we have to establish that trust and this exercise builds that trust.” The training exercise will finish with the Coast Guard coordinating with ground units to do a cliff rescue evolution at Patrick’s Point on Thursday afternoon. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. 
18 Apr 19
Jose’smusic

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