Squier

19 Jun 19
James Wyness

This post is  by way of summarising what I’ve read to date and where I (think) I’m going with my reading and investigations. I started reading about photography many years before I enrolled on the course. Some I’m still reading in slow time. I’ve added comments where I think the book or article is especially […]

19 Jun 19
Tim's Thoughts

ORIGINALLY WRITTEN APRIL 24, 2019 While in college, I managed to find a circle of friends who were all pretty creative in their own right. Some played instruments (guitar mostly), and some did drawings & other artwork. One of the guitarists was a guy named Brian Tomory. He & I found a lot of common ground […]

19 Jun 19
Relja's Audio

Ton svake jeftine Squier by Fender gitare mozete poboljsati zamenom magneta za Alnico V magnete koje za 15 $ mozete naruciti iz Kine 🙂 Smanjenjem vrednosti kondenzatora na ton kontrolama mozete poboljsati i ton kontrole.

19 Jun 19
Times-Standard
A man arrested in connection with a robbery at a Southern Humboldt residence and a subsequent vehicle pursuit and standoff in Northern Mendocino County has been held to answer to six felony charges. He could face two fresh charges when he’s arraigned on information in July. On Tuesday, Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Kaleb Cockrum ordered that Franklin Antonio Molina, a native of El Salvador, be held to answer to one count of kidnapping to commit another crime, one count of first-degree robbery, two counts of false imprisonment by violence, one count of assault likely to produce great bodily injury and one count of kidnapping. In addition, Molina could face additional charges. According to the prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Luke Bernthal, the final decision on what those charges will be made soon. Molina “He’ll be charged with kidnap for robbery which is a life top charge (maximum sentence of life in prison) and there will be a firearms enhancement to that which will add an additional 10 years,” Bernthal said following the hearing, who then addressed any further charges related to vehicle theft. “We’ll consider whether we want to do that; I’m not ready to make a decision on that at this time.” Cockrum’s ruling came after about three and a half hours of testimony from three witnesses called by Bernthal. The prosecutor called two Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office employees, a patrol deputy and a sergeant who is both a Spanish speaker as well as a trained crisis negotiator and one of the victims named in the complaint, Adam Owen. Owen’s testimony about what happened on the night of December 21, 2018, revolved around finding two armed men wearing ski masks who had made entry into his residence on a property about an hour from Garberville. Owen said he at first thought the men were playing a prank but the laughter soon stopped when he realized he was under threat. “I was sitting on my couch and my daughter was sitting next to me,” Owen testified, saying he initially thought the vehicle he heard pull up outside his residence may be his brother-in-law. “Two men walked in wearing ski masks and big smiles on their faces and I thought it was a joke. Then they raised three or maybe four firearms and pointed them at me and my daughter.” Bernthal then walked Owen through what happened next. The two armed suspects began yelling at the victims, telling them repeatedly to get down in a mixture of Spanish and English. “I put my hands up and told my daughter to get on the floor and do what they say,” Owen said. Owen testified that one suspect who he identified as Molina was “very angry,” that he was “yelling” and that he was “very loud” and “he said something about my brother.” Owen added, “at one point he said the word ‘money’ in a long drawn-out voice.” The two suspects forced Owen and his daughter to leave the residence and go to a detached garage across the driveway. Before that happened, Owen said, Molina hit him several times in the head with what he believed was a firearm, and they weren’t light blows. “He hit me very hard,” Owens said, adding he kept repeating “no problem, no problem” to the suspects to show he was complying but the blows continued. Owen said he opened a safe in the garage that contained firearms including handguns along with $30,000 in cash, items that would never be recovered by investigators. Once the suspects had emptied the safe in the garage Owen testified they led him and his daughter back into the house and up to a bedroom where he had a second safe. Once again he opened the safe while under duress from the suspects. “I remember him (the defendant) saying, ‘More, more’,” referring to money, Owen said. The second safe also contained firearms, including a shotgun and a deer rifle along with gold coins. The suspects stole the contents from that safe and then Molina struck Owen again. “He had me get face down on the floor as he was yelling,” Owen said. “I could hear them putting stuff into a duffel bag and he began hitting me harder. I pretended to be blacked out.” Owen said the suspects then forced him back down the stairs to the ground floor where he and his daughter were locked into a closet as the suspects fled the scene. Under cross-examination from defense attorney, Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo, Owen was questioned closely about the clothes he saw, how he recognized Molina and how he differentiated Molina from the second suspect — a man who remains free. Russo pointed out contradictions between the statement Owen gave to a sheriff’s deputy shortly after law enforcement arrived at his residence, what he told lead investigator Jennifer Turner and what he testified to under questioning from Bernthal. “You were complying with their demands not to look at them, correct?” Russo asked Owen, who responded, “Yes.” Russo questioned how Owen recognized Molina under a mask and Owen said at one point the mask came up and he saw the bottom half of Molina’s face, a feature he recognized in a mugshot he saw in the days after the incident. Russo’s line of questioning wasn’t enough, however. Cockrum made his ruling to hold Molina to answer the charges. Molina appeared in court wearing jail-issued clothing. He was seated at the defense table next to Russo during the proceedings and he was assisted by a Spanish language interpreter Carlos Santana. Molina will be back in court for an arraignment on information on July 2 where Bernthal could introduce new charges, including making criminal threats and vehicle theft. His bail remains set at $250,000. “We’re still early on in the process,” Bernthal said following the hearing. “We’re moving forward and we view this as a life top case and that’s how it’s been charged.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
19 Jun 19
Redwood Times
A man arrested in connection with a robbery at a Southern Humboldt residence and a subsequent vehicle pursuit and standoff in Northern Mendocino County has been held to answer to six felony charges. He could face two fresh charges when he’s arraigned on information in July. On Tuesday, Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Kaleb Cockrum ordered that Franklin Antonio Molina, a native of El Salvador, be held to answer to one count of kidnapping to commit another crime, one count of first-degree robbery, two counts of false imprisonment by violence, one count of assault likely to produce great bodily injury and one count of kidnapping. In addition, Molina could face additional charges. According to the prosecutor, Deputy District Attorney Luke Bernthal, the final decision on what those charges will be made soon. Molina “He’ll be charged with kidnap for robbery which is a life top charge (maximum sentence of life in prison) and there will be a firearms enhancement to that which will add an additional 10 years,” Bernthal said following the hearing, who then addressed any further charges related to vehicle theft. “We’ll consider whether we want to do that; I’m not ready to make a decision on that at this time.” Cockrum’s ruling came after about three and a half hours of testimony from three witnesses called by Bernthal. The prosecutor called two Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office employees, a patrol deputy and a sergeant who is both a Spanish speaker as well as a trained crisis negotiator and one of the victims named in the complaint, Adam Owen. Owen’s testimony about what happened on the night of December 21, 2018, revolved around finding two armed men wearing ski masks who had made entry into his residence on a property about an hour from Garberville. Owen said he at first thought the men were playing a prank but the laughter soon stopped when he realized he was under threat. “I was sitting on my couch and my daughter was sitting next to me,” Owen testified, saying he initially thought the vehicle he heard pull up outside his residence may be his brother-in-law. “Two men walked in wearing ski masks and big smiles on their faces and I thought it was a joke. Then they raised three or maybe four firearms and pointed them at me and my daughter.” Bernthal then walked Owen through what happened next. The two armed suspects began yelling at the victims, telling them repeatedly to get down in a mixture of Spanish and English. “I put my hands up and told my daughter to get on the floor and do what they say,” Owen said. Owen testified that one suspect who he identified as Molina was “very angry,” that he was “yelling” and that he was “very loud” and “he said something about my brother.” Owen added, “at one point he said the word ‘money’ in a long drawn-out voice.” The two suspects forced Owen and his daughter to leave the residence and go to a detached garage across the driveway. Before that happened, Owen said, Molina hit him several times in the head with what he believed was a firearm, and they weren’t light blows. “He hit me very hard,” Owens said, adding he kept repeating “no problem, no problem” to the suspects to show he was complying but the blows continued. Owen said he opened a safe in the garage that contained firearms including handguns along with $30,000 in cash, items that would never be recovered by investigators. Once the suspects had emptied the safe in the garage Owen testified they led him and his daughter back into the house and up to a bedroom where he had a second safe. Once again he opened the safe while under duress from the suspects. “I remember him (the defendant) saying, ‘More, more’,” referring to money, Owen said. The second safe also contained firearms, including a shotgun and a deer rifle along with gold coins. The suspects stole the contents from that safe and then Molina struck Owen again. “He had me get face down on the floor as he was yelling,” Owen said. “I could hear them putting stuff into a duffel bag and he began hitting me harder. I pretended to be blacked out.” Owen said the suspects then forced him back down the stairs to the ground floor where he and his daughter were locked into a closet as the suspects fled the scene. Under cross-examination from defense attorney, Deputy Public Defender Casey Russo, Owen was questioned closely about the clothes he saw, how he recognized Molina and how he differentiated Molina from the second suspect — a man who remains free. Russo pointed out contradictions between the statement Owen gave to a sheriff’s deputy shortly after law enforcement arrived at his residence, what he told lead investigator Jennifer Turner and what he testified to under questioning from Bernthal. “You were complying with their demands not to look at them, correct?” Russo asked Owen, who responded, “Yes.” Russo questioned how Owen recognized Molina under a mask and Owen said at one point the mask came up and he saw the bottom half of Molina’s face, a feature he recognized in a mugshot he saw in the days after the incident. Russo’s line of questioning wasn’t enough, however. Cockrum made his ruling to hold Molina to answer the charges. Molina appeared in court wearing jail-issued clothing. He was seated at the defense table next to Russo during the proceedings and he was assisted by a Spanish language interpreter Carlos Santana. Molina will be back in court for an arraignment on information on July 2 where Bernthal could introduce new charges, including making criminal threats and vehicle theft. His bail remains set at $250,000. “We’re still early on in the process,” Bernthal said following the hearing. “We’re moving forward and we view this as a life top case and that’s how it’s been charged.” Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
18 Jun 19
CECCHERINIMUSIC

CHITARRA ELETTRICA Squier Affinity Series guitars are the best value in electric guitar design. The Affinity Series Stratocaster HSS delivers solid sound and style, along with a two-color headstock logo, single-ply “platinum sparkle” pickguard, and eye-catching finishes. Other features include single-coil neck and middle pickups, humbucking bridge pickup, five-way switching, smooth-playing rosewood fingerboard with 21 […]

18 Jun 19
Mentorphile

During my few years as a sound reinforcement engineer I worked with lots of local acts, as they would open for the established headliners like Aerosmith or ZZ Top. (One of those opening acts was Jay Leno, believe it or not!) These musicians virtually all had day jobs, as playing music didn’t pay the bills. […]

18 Jun 19
Newsfile Corp.

Thunder Bay, Ontario–(Newsfile Corp. – June 18, 2019) – White Metal Resources Corp. (TSXV: WHM) (“White Metal” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has received approval from the TSX Venture Exchange (the “Exchange”) to acquire certain mineral properties in Namibia. Through a binding letter of intent between White Metal and Taranis Resources […]

18 Jun 19
Redwood Times
Editor’s note: This report contains graphic content that may be disturbing for some readers. A Eureka man accused of fatally stabbing another Eureka man will be held to answer to first-degree murder charges, a judge ruled this afternoon. Albert Durant Kress, 48, was arrested by Eureka police on March 12 and booked in connection with the stabbing death of Raymond Prudhomme at Prudhomme’s Old Town Eureka apartment in February. Superior Court Judge Marilyn Miles ruled there was “sufficient evidence to hold the defendant to answer the charge and the special allegation (of using a knife).” Kress pleaded not guilty to the homicide charge and denied the special allegation. Kress Over the course of about three hours today, Deputy District Attorney Luke Bernthal questioned the two detectives who investigated the incident, Eureka police detective Rick Bise and Eureka Police Department senior detective Ron Harpham. Bise, the lead detective on the investigation, walked through what he saw after he was dispatched for a report of a deceased man in an Old Town apartment. Previously, a Eureka officer on a welfare check found Prudhomme dead. Bise testified that he, along with Humboldt County Deputy County Coroner Sgt. Jamie Barney, found the victim’s body “lying on his right side beneath an open window with and his head and face were covered with a blue pillowcase.” As the two men approached the body and Barney removed the pillowcase, they saw a laceration extending across the front of Prudhomme’s neck that would later be determined to the fatal one following an autopsy. “The jugular vein had been severed,” Bise said as he described how the coroner, Dr. Mark Super, performed the autopsy. “The right collarbone had been fractured and two ribs had been fractured. The cause of death was the incision to the neck.” Bise testified the body has been in the apartment for a “couple of days” and surmised the cold weather prevented immediate decay. He said they found blood on Prudhomme’s face and hands, his clothing and blood spatters in the area around the body. “The death, at that point, appeared suspicious” Bise testified, adding he contacted his office to inform them and the homicide investigation was opened. The two detectives interviewed several people during the course of the investigation including neighbors, the building manager, a woman and a man known to Prudhomme who were at the scene the day of his death as well as Kress. Bise said one witness, identified as Mariah Morgan, met Prudhomme for a free meal in downtown Eureka and the pair went back to Prudhomme’s apartment to “smoke.” There, Morgan testified a man later identified as Kress, placed towels over sprinkler heads believing they were surveillance cameras and that “AD had a knife in his hand,” identifying Kress by his first two initials as he was commonly known. Morgan said Kress and Prudhomme argued. At one point, Kress shoved or pushed Prudhomme who slammed into the wall. “He f——g went flying into the wall,” Bise testified Morgan told him during an interview. “She said it was loud and that she turned away,” Bise said, adding, “She never saw Mr. Prudhomme with a weapon.” Bise said Morgan hid in the bathroom while the altercation between Kress and Prudhomme took place. Afterward, Bise said, Kress threatened Morgan. Bise testified Morgan told him, “There was a lot of blood.” Under cross-examination from Public Defender Marek Reavis, Bise answered questions about who was present and Kress’ mental health at the time he was interviewed by police. Reavis asked Bise about DNA evidence in the case that had been sent to the state Justice Department for analysis. Bise responded that none of the materials sent for testing have been returned, therefore, there has been no determination as to who the DNA belongs to. Later, Harpham was called to testify about his interviews with Kress as well as witnesses. “He answered in a logical manner,” Harpham said of Kress, adding, “He was respectful and I hope we were respectful back.” The hearing ended with Miles holding Kress to answer the murder charge and the special allegation. He will be back in court July 8 for a trial setting. Kress appeared in court wearing jail-issued clothing. He remains in custody with bail set at $1,050,000. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”2229734,2228513,2250083″]
18 Jun 19
Redwood Times
Editor’s note: This report contains graphic content that may be disturbing for some readers. A Eureka man accused of fatally stabbing another Eureka man will be held to answer to first-degree murder charges, a judge ruled this afternoon. Albert Durant Kress, 48, was arrested by Eureka police on March 12 and booked in connection with the stabbing death of Raymond Prudhomme at Prudhomme’s Old Town Eureka apartment in February. Superior Court Judge Marilyn Miles ruled there was “sufficient evidence to hold the defendant to answer the charge and the special allegation (of using a knife).” Kress pleaded not guilty to the homicide charge and denied the special allegation. Kress Over the course of about three hours today, Deputy District Attorney Luke Bernthal questioned the two detectives who investigated the incident, Eureka police detective Rick Bise and Eureka Police Department senior detective Ron Harpham. Bise, the lead detective on the investigation, walked through what he saw after he was dispatched for a report of a deceased man in an Old Town apartment. Previously, a Eureka officer on a welfare check found Prudhomme dead. Bise testified that he, along with Humboldt County Deputy County Coroner Sgt. Jamie Barney, found the victim’s body “lying on his right side beneath an open window with and his head and face were covered with a blue pillowcase.” As the two men approached the body and Barney removed the pillowcase, they saw a laceration extending across the front of Prudhomme’s neck that would later be determined to the fatal one following an autopsy. “The jugular vein had been severed,” Bise said as he described how the coroner, Dr. Mark Super, performed the autopsy. “The right collarbone had been fractured and two ribs had been fractured. The cause of death was the incision to the neck.” Bise testified the body has been in the apartment for a “couple of days” and surmised the cold weather prevented immediate decay. He said they found blood on Prudhomme’s face and hands, his clothing and blood spatters in the area around the body. “The death, at that point, appeared suspicious” Bise testified, adding he contacted his office to inform them and the homicide investigation was opened. The two detectives interviewed several people during the course of the investigation including neighbors, the building manager, a woman and a man known to Prudhomme who were at the scene the day of his death as well as Kress. Bise said one witness, identified as Mariah Morgan, met Prudhomme for a free meal in downtown Eureka and the pair went back to Prudhomme’s apartment to “smoke.” There, Morgan testified a man later identified as Kress, placed towels over sprinkler heads believing they were surveillance cameras and that “AD had a knife in his hand,” identifying Kress by his first two initials as he was commonly known. Morgan said Kress and Prudhomme argued. At one point, Kress shoved or pushed Prudhomme who slammed into the wall. “He f——g went flying into the wall,” Bise testified Morgan told him during an interview. “She said it was loud and that she turned away,” Bise said, adding, “She never saw Mr. Prudhomme with a weapon.” Bise said Morgan hid in the bathroom while the altercation between Kress and Prudhomme took place. Afterward, Bise said, Kress threatened Morgan. Bise testified Morgan told him, “There was a lot of blood.” Under cross-examination from Public Defender Marek Reavis, Bise answered questions about who was present and Kress’ mental health at the time he was interviewed by police. Reavis asked Bise about DNA evidence in the case that had been sent to the state Justice Department for analysis. Bise responded that none of the materials sent for testing have been returned, therefore, there has been no determination as to who the DNA belongs to. Later, Harpham was called to testify about his interviews with Kress as well as witnesses. “He answered in a logical manner,” Harpham said of Kress, adding, “He was respectful and I hope we were respectful back.” The hearing ended with Miles holding Kress to answer the murder charge and the special allegation. He will be back in court July 8 for a trial setting. Kress appeared in court wearing jail-issued clothing. He remains in custody with bail set at $1,050,000. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”2229734,2228513,2250083″]
18 Jun 19
Times-Standard
Editor’s note: This report contains graphic content that may be disturbing for some readers. A Eureka man accused of fatally stabbing another Eureka man will be held to answer to first-degree murder charges, a judge ruled this afternoon. Albert Durant Kress, 48, was arrested by Eureka police on March 12 and booked in connection with the stabbing death of Raymond Prudhomme at Prudhomme’s Old Town Eureka apartment in February. Superior Court Judge Marilyn Miles ruled there was “sufficient evidence to hold the defendant to answer the charge and the special allegation (of using a knife).” Kress pleaded not guilty to the homicide charge and denied the special allegation. Kress Over the course of about three hours today, Deputy District Attorney Luke Bernthal questioned the two detectives who investigated the incident, Eureka police detective Rick Bise and Eureka Police Department senior detective Ron Harpham. Bise, the lead detective on the investigation, walked through what he saw after he was dispatched for a report of a deceased man in an Old Town apartment. Previously, a Eureka officer on a welfare check found Prudhomme dead. Bise testified that he, along with Humboldt County Deputy County Coroner Sgt. Jamie Barney, found the victim’s body “lying on his right side beneath an open window with and his head and face were covered with a blue pillowcase.” As the two men approached the body and Barney removed the pillowcase, they saw a laceration extending across the front of Prudhomme’s neck that would later be determined to the fatal one following an autopsy. “The jugular vein had been severed,” Bise said as he described how the coroner, Dr. Mark Super, performed the autopsy. “The right collarbone had been fractured and two ribs had been fractured. The cause of death was the incision to the neck.” Bise testified the body has been in the apartment for a “couple of days” and surmised the cold weather prevented immediate decay. He said they found blood on Prudhomme’s face and hands, his clothing and blood spatters in the area around the body. “The death, at that point, appeared suspicious” Bise testified, adding he contacted his office to inform them and the homicide investigation was opened. The two detectives interviewed several people during the course of the investigation including neighbors, the building manager, a woman and a man known to Prudhomme who were at the scene the day of his death as well as Kress. Bise said one witness, identified as Mariah Morgan, met Prudhomme for a free meal in downtown Eureka and the pair went back to Prudhomme’s apartment to “smoke.” There, Morgan testified a man later identified as Kress, placed towels over sprinkler heads believing they were surveillance cameras and that “AD had a knife in his hand,” identifying Kress by his first two initials as he was commonly known. Morgan said Kress and Prudhomme argued. At one point, Kress shoved or pushed Prudhomme who slammed into the wall. “He f——g went flying into the wall,” Bise testified Morgan told him during an interview. “She said it was loud and that she turned away,” Bise said, adding, “She never saw Mr. Prudhomme with a weapon.” Bise said Morgan hid in the bathroom while the altercation between Kress and Prudhomme took place. Afterward, Bise said, Kress threatened Morgan. Bise testified Morgan told him, “There was a lot of blood.” Under cross-examination from Public Defender Marek Reavis, Bise answered questions about who was present and Kress’ mental health at the time he was interviewed by police. Reavis asked Bise about DNA evidence in the case that had been sent to the state Justice Department for analysis. Bise responded that none of the materials sent for testing have been returned, therefore, there has been no determination as to who the DNA belongs to. Later, Harpham was called to testify about his interviews with Kress as well as witnesses. “He answered in a logical manner,” Harpham said of Kress, adding, “He was respectful and I hope we were respectful back.” The hearing ended with Miles holding Kress to answer the murder charge and the special allegation. He will be back in court July 8 for a trial setting. Kress appeared in court wearing jail-issued clothing. He remains in custody with bail set at $1,050,000. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”2229734,2228513,2250083″]
17 Jun 19
lauravent69

My brother found this Billy Squier album. He had to buy it for me as he knows he is my favorite! The problem, I didn’t have a turntable. Problem solved! I happened to find some other great albums while on my turntable hunt. I am reliving my youth today. I needed this! 💜🎶🎵🎶

17 Jun 19
Misty's Book Space

Hello bookworms!! I have been thinking about looking back at my book hauls from when I first started blogging to see if I have read any of the books I hauled. I have seen both Michelle and Maisy do posts like this and you should definitely check out both of their blogs. I have decided to make this […]

17 Jun 19
MUSIC & MEMORIES

I have spent thousands of hours talking music, bands, songs and concerts in my 51+ years. And often somewhere in that conversation I get the question of favorite band(s) and song(s). For years, I have struggled to answer that question. I love music and so many different bands and artists for a variety of different […]

17 Jun 19
GRCC Today

The National Endowment for the Humanities’ Research Division is accepting applications for the Summer Stipends program. The purpose of this program is to stimulate new research in the humanities and its publication. The award supports continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. NEH funds may support recipients’ compensation, […]

17 Jun 19
Flowers For Socrates

June 17th is Apple Strudel Day Dollars Against Diabetes Day * Eat Your Vegetables Day World Tesselation Day * World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought * ______________________________________ MORE! Mumtaz Mahal, Charles Eames and Carol Anderson, click