Squier

21 Feb 19
Alabama Connected

New video John 5 Interview @SweetwaterSound on @YouTube Via Sweetwater @The65Connection More videos like this John 5 Interview 👉 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlczpwSXEOyZrdT8NoO07KFyyMdgnCVLl Shop for the Squier John 5 Signature Telecaster 👉 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TeleJ5SILGLD–squier-john-5-signature-telecaster-gold/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Referral&ut… View On WordPress from hip hop news source https://ift.tt/2TW3Pah

21 Feb 19
Indiana Connected

New video John 5 Interview @SweetwaterSound on @YouTube Via Sweetwater @The65Connection More videos like this John 5 Interview 👉 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlczpwSXEOyZrdT8NoO07KFyyMdgnCVLl Shop for the Squier John 5 Signature Telecaster 👉 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TeleJ5SILGLD–squier-john-5-signature-telecaster-gold/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Referral&ut… View On WordPress from hip hop news source https://ift.tt/2TW3Pah

21 Feb 19
Tennessee Connected

New video John 5 Interview @SweetwaterSound on @YouTube Via Sweetwater @The65Connection More videos like this John 5 Interview 👉 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlczpwSXEOyZrdT8NoO07KFyyMdgnCVLl Shop for the Squier John 5 Signature Telecaster 👉 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TeleJ5SILGLD–squier-john-5-signature-telecaster-gold/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Referral&ut… View On WordPress from hip hop news source https://ift.tt/2TW3Pah

21 Feb 19
Kentucky Connect

New video John 5 Interview @SweetwaterSound on @YouTube Via Sweetwater @The65Connection More videos like this John 5 Interview 👉 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlczpwSXEOyZrdT8NoO07KFyyMdgnCVLl Shop for the Squier John 5 Signature Telecaster 👉 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TeleJ5SILGLD–squier-john-5-signature-telecaster-gold/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Referral&ut… View On WordPress from hip hop news source https://ift.tt/2TW3Pah

21 Feb 19
Site Title

New video John 5 Interview @SweetwaterSound on @YouTube Via Sweetwater @The65Connection More videos like this John 5 Interview 👉 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlczpwSXEOyZrdT8NoO07KFyyMdgnCVLl Shop for the Squier John 5 Signature Telecaster 👉 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/TeleJ5SILGLD–squier-john-5-signature-telecaster-gold/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Referral&ut… View On WordPress from hip hop news source https://ift.tt/2TW3Pah

21 Feb 19
Eris

NEW Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s – Butterscotch Blonde (418) – Buy – NEW Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s – Butterscotch Blonde (418)

21 Feb 19
Eris

NEW Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s – Butterscotch Blonde (238) – Buy – NEW Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s – Butterscotch Blonde (238)

21 Feb 19
Redwood Times
A ruling from the United States Supreme Court on Tuesday will protect the money and property of people who have seen their assets seized by law enforcement agencies. The unanimous ruling, authored by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, found that the Eighth Amendment’s ban on excessive fees and fines applies not just to the federal government but to state and local governments as well. “The Eighth Amendment’s Excessive Fines Clause is an incorporated protection applicable to the states under the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause,” the ruling states. “The Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause incorporates and renders applicable to the States Bill of Rights protections ‘fundamental to our scheme of ordered liberty,’ or ‘deeply rooted in this nation’s history and tradition.’ The prohibition embodied in the Excessive Fines Clause carries forward protections found in sources from the Magna Carta to the English Bill of Rights to state constitutions from the colonial era to the present day. Protection against excessive fines has been a constant shield throughout Anglo-American history for good reason: Such fines undermine other liberties.” The decision stemmed from a case in Indiana in which a man who was convicted of selling about $400 worth of heroin to an undercover police officer, also had a $40,000 vehicle seized. The vehicle had been purchased with money from a life insurance policy following the death of the plaintiff’s father. The trial court ruled the seizure of a vehicle purchased with legal funds was excessive, a ruling overturned by the Indiana State Supreme Court. The case was then taken on by the Supreme Court resulting in Tuesday’s ruling because the vehicle was worth more than four times the maximum fine the plaintiff would face and was deemed excessive and disproportionate. Locally, the ruling may not have much of an impact despite regular asset seizures by the Humboldt County Drug Task Force and that is due to changes in state law enacted in 2016. In September 2016, then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 443, which tightened the rules under which state and local law enforcement agencies can seize money and property. Previous to the passage of SB 443, law enforcement agencies could seize assets regardless of whether a suspect had been convicted of a crime and then used a federal sharing percentage that allowed agencies to keep up to 80 percent of the assets seized. “Say that I stop you at a traffic stop and you have a few thousand dollars in the car; I can’t just keep that money and use it,” said Lt. Michael Fridley, special operations supervisor with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. “Now, we have to provide you information on what we seized and how you can get it back and if you can demonstrate to the court you got it legally, you get it back. We can’t take people’s money and keep it.” Fridley said 25 years ago when marijuana eradication was the primary goal, local authorities would seize property connected to grows, something that was addressed by SB 443. If the amount of money seized during an investigation is less than $40,000, it must be held until there is a conviction and no real property such as vehicles or houses can be seized. “We did a lot of work where we took cars and stuff — we used to take people’s property,” Fridley said. “Now, if I take your vehicle following that traffic stop, I have to store it, keep it in the same operating condition as when it was seized. It can’t be inoperable or disabled, left outside with the brakes frozen. We don’t have the space to store those vehicles nor the time and effort to maintain them.” According to an annual report issued by the California Attorney General’s Office, in 2017 Humboldt County reported 55 asset forfeitures had been completed with just under $870,000 disbursed to the California District Attorney’s Association, the Humboldt County District Attorney, the local Drug Task Force and the state’s General Fund. The DA, for example, received about $96,000 in funds from seizures and according to District Attorney Maggie Fleming, the amount of money the office received fluctuates because it’s generally based on drug-trafficking investigations. “The money we receive from asset forfeiture exhibits a lot of annual variation because it is often strongly influenced by a few drug cases,” Fleming said. “Each county is responsible for its asset forfeiture activities. The California District Attorneys Association provides ethical guidelines and keeps counties informed on the relevant law.” Fleming added that assets seized locally won’t be impacted by the ruling. “The recent Supreme Court case does not apply to asset forfeitures in Humboldt County. The key difference is that the recent Supreme Court case included evidence that the asset in question was legally obtained, while Humboldt County only seeks forfeiture of assets obtained through illegal activity. Here the asset forfeiture process ends whenever defendants can show the assets were legally obtained,” Fleming said. “However, the ruling makes sense to me. I think assets legally obtained should remain apart from the criminal justice process unless they are needed to cover reasonable fines linked to criminal activity.” You can read the text of the Supreme Court ruling at https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/18pdf/17-1091_5536.pdf. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
21 Feb 19
Times-Standard
A ruling from the United States Supreme Court on Tuesday will protect the money and property of people who have seen their assets seized by law enforcement agencies. The unanimous ruling, authored by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, found that the Eighth Amendment’s ban on excessive fees and fines applies not just to the federal government but to state and local governments as well. “The Eighth Amendment’s Excessive Fines Clause is an incorporated protection applicable to the states under the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause,” the ruling states. “The Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause incorporates and renders applicable to the States Bill of Rights protections ‘fundamental to our scheme of ordered liberty,’ or ‘deeply rooted in this nation’s history and tradition.’ The prohibition embodied in the Excessive Fines Clause carries forward protections found in sources from the Magna Carta to the English Bill of Rights to state constitutions from the colonial era to the present day. Protection against excessive fines has been a constant shield throughout Anglo-American history for good reason: Such fines undermine other liberties.” The decision stemmed from a case in Indiana in which a man who was convicted of selling about $400 worth of heroin to an undercover police officer, also had a $40,000 vehicle seized. The vehicle had been purchased with money from a life insurance policy following the death of the plaintiff’s father. The trial court ruled the seizure of a vehicle purchased with legal funds was excessive, a ruling overturned by the Indiana State Supreme Court. The case was then taken on by the Supreme Court resulting in Tuesday’s ruling because the vehicle was worth more than four times the maximum fine the plaintiff would face and was deemed excessive and disproportionate. Locally, the ruling may not have much of an impact despite regular asset seizures by the Humboldt County Drug Task Force and that is due to changes in state law enacted in 2016. In September 2016, then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 443, which tightened the rules under which state and local law enforcement agencies can seize money and property. Previous to the passage of SB 443, law enforcement agencies could seize assets regardless of whether a suspect had been convicted of a crime and then used a federal sharing percentage that allowed agencies to keep up to 80 percent of the assets seized. “Say that I stop you at a traffic stop and you have a few thousand dollars in the car; I can’t just keep that money and use it,” said Lt. Michael Fridley, special operations supervisor with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. “Now, we have to provide you information on what we seized and how you can get it back and if you can demonstrate to the court you got it legally, you get it back. We can’t take people’s money and keep it.” Fridley said 25 years ago when marijuana eradication was the primary goal, local authorities would seize property connected to grows, something that was addressed by SB 443. If the amount of money seized during an investigation is less than $40,000, it must be held until there is a conviction and no real property such as vehicles or houses can be seized. “We did a lot of work where we took cars and stuff — we used to take people’s property,” Fridley said. “Now, if I take your vehicle following that traffic stop, I have to store it, keep it in the same operating condition as when it was seized. It can’t be inoperable or disabled, left outside with the brakes frozen. We don’t have the space to store those vehicles nor the time and effort to maintain them.” According to an annual report issued by the California Attorney General’s Office, in 2017 Humboldt County reported 55 asset forfeitures had been completed with just under $870,000 disbursed to the California District Attorney’s Association, the Humboldt County District Attorney, the local Drug Task Force and the state’s General Fund. The DA, for example, received about $96,000 in funds from seizures and according to District Attorney Maggie Fleming, the amount of money the office received fluctuates because it’s generally based on drug-trafficking investigations. “The money we receive from asset forfeiture exhibits a lot of annual variation because it is often strongly influenced by a few drug cases,” Fleming said. “Each county is responsible for its asset forfeiture activities. The California District Attorneys Association provides ethical guidelines and keeps counties informed on the relevant law.” Fleming added that assets seized locally won’t be impacted by the ruling. “The recent Supreme Court case does not apply to asset forfeitures in Humboldt County. The key difference is that the recent Supreme Court case included evidence that the asset in question was legally obtained, while Humboldt County only seeks forfeiture of assets obtained through illegal activity. Here the asset forfeiture process ends whenever defendants can show the assets were legally obtained,” Fleming said. “However, the ruling makes sense to me. I think assets legally obtained should remain apart from the criminal justice process unless they are needed to cover reasonable fines linked to criminal activity.” You can read the text of the Supreme Court ruling at https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/18pdf/17-1091_5536.pdf. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
21 Feb 19
Eris

Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s Electric Guitar (Butterscotch Blonde) (Used) – Buy – Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster ’50s Electric Guitar (Butterscotch Blonde) (Used)

20 Feb 19
Markets n Trends Analysis

MarketResearchNest.com adds “Global Electric Guitar Market Growth 2019-2024” new report to its research database. The report spread across 158 pages with multiple tables and figures in it. This comprehensive Electric Guitar Market research report includes a brief on these trends that can help the businesses operating in the industry to understand the market and strategize […]

20 Feb 19
destroyerofharmony

The cover artwork for the albums I have is created by Roger Dean. His art made the “Yes”, “Uriah Heap” and “Asia” albums iconic. He even sued James Cameron for using one of his covers as an inspiration for an Avatar scene. So how did Asia come into my life? It started with the magazines […]

20 Feb 19
Redwood Times
U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman will join state Assemblyman Jim Wood for a community town hall meeting Thursday evening at St. Bernard’s Academy in Eureka. The two lawmakers have teamed up before to hold joint meetings on the North Coast and the town hall will give local residents a chance to ask questions of both men. Huffman “I’m sure we’ll get a lot of questions about President Trump and the Green New Deal,” Huffman said Tuesday. “I’m ready to move the needle on climate change in this Congress and I consider it deeply reckless to deny climate change and its impacts.” The town hall was coordinated between Huffman’s Office and Jim Ritter at St. Bernard’s, who runs the career counseling program at the school and who coordinates events involving students and members of the community. “Jim (Ritter) is instrumental in bringing the community to the school and connecting our kids with business leaders and others,” said school president Paul Shanahan. “We try to do at least one panel per month and Congressman Huffman and Assemblymember Wood have been in for one before. They were both impressed with the students and their questions and follow-up dialogue. We love to see democracy in action, and if you’re a teenager at this town hall, you will see a variety of views in the audience across the political spectrum.” Huffman and Wood will focus on issues and priorities that impact the North Coast and it’s a chance for local residents to get the perspective from both the state and federal levels. “It’s unusual to get state and federal representatives together and we will do that (Tuesday night) and then take it on the road to Humboldt,” Huffman said. “I like it because so many of the big issues we face — broadband internet access, health care, environment — are issues that have elements at both the state and federal levels. We try to work closely together to deliver for the folks we represent. Even an issue like immigration, which you might think is just a federal issue, has state elements that need to be addressed.” Wood The organizers expect a large and active crowd and for Wood, it’s another chance to interact with constituents on a face-to-face basis. “I enjoy the town hall meetings we hold throughout the district,” Wood said. “This town hall will offer our constituents an opportunity to ask about both state and federal issues, and although we receive emails and phone calls from constituents on issues they are concerned about, venues like a town hall can be quite lively, and I’m good with lively.” Shanahan expects a good turnout. “I think it will be a full house and they offered our students the chance to ask the first two questions,” Shanahan said. “The students know their voice will be heard and they will get a sense of what others think and a sense of the pulse of the county.” If you go: What: U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman and Assemblymember Jim Wood town hall meeting Where: St. Bernard’s Academy, 222 Dollison St., Eureka When: Thursday from 5:30-7 p.m. More information: https://bit.ly/2Iq1Gm5 Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Feb 19
Times-Standard
U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman will join state Assemblyman Jim Wood for a community town hall meeting Thursday evening at St. Bernard’s Academy in Eureka. The two lawmakers have teamed up before to hold joint meetings on the North Coast and the town hall will give local residents a chance to ask questions of both men. Huffman “I’m sure we’ll get a lot of questions about President Trump and the Green New Deal,” Huffman said Tuesday. “I’m ready to move the needle on climate change in this Congress and I consider it deeply reckless to deny climate change and its impacts.” The town hall was coordinated between Huffman’s Office and Jim Ritter at St. Bernard’s, who runs the career counseling program at the school and who coordinates events involving students and members of the community. “Jim (Ritter) is instrumental in bringing the community to the school and connecting our kids with business leaders and others,” said school president Paul Shanahan. “We try to do at least one panel per month and Congressman Huffman and Assemblymember Wood have been in for one before. They were both impressed with the students and their questions and follow-up dialogue. We love to see democracy in action, and if you’re a teenager at this town hall, you will see a variety of views in the audience across the political spectrum.” Huffman and Wood will focus on issues and priorities that impact the North Coast and it’s a chance for local residents to get the perspective from both the state and federal levels. “It’s unusual to get state and federal representatives together and we will do that (Tuesday night) and then take it on the road to Humboldt,” Huffman said. “I like it because so many of the big issues we face — broadband internet access, health care, environment — are issues that have elements at both the state and federal levels. We try to work closely together to deliver for the folks we represent. Even an issue like immigration, which you might think is just a federal issue, has state elements that need to be addressed.” Wood The organizers expect a large and active crowd and for Wood, it’s another chance to interact with constituents on a face-to-face basis. “I enjoy the town hall meetings we hold throughout the district,” Wood said. “This town hall will offer our constituents an opportunity to ask about both state and federal issues, and although we receive emails and phone calls from constituents on issues they are concerned about, venues like a town hall can be quite lively, and I’m good with lively.” Shanahan expects a good turnout. “I think it will be a full house and they offered our students the chance to ask the first two questions,” Shanahan said. “The students know their voice will be heard and they will get a sense of what others think and a sense of the pulse of the county.” If you go: What: U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman and Assemblymember Jim Wood town hall meeting Where: St. Bernard’s Academy, 222 Dollison St., Eureka When: Thursday from 5:30-7 p.m. More information: https://bit.ly/2Iq1Gm5 Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Feb 19
Redwood Times
The callers have various ways in which they attempt to defraud a target of a phone scam. There are the IRS scams in which the target of the call is threatened with penalties if they don’t pay a fictitious bill. There are the ones aimed at grandparents where the scammer attempts to fool the target into believing a grandchild needs money for bail or some other emergency. Now, the calls and scams have escalated to threats of violence, kidnapping and even homicide. The Arcata Police Department issued a statement reporting the department has received two calls this month, phone calls that begin with a screaming voice followed by a male voice claiming they have kidnapped a relative and threatening to kill the relative unless a ransom has been paid. The threats of violence and murder are a step up in seriousness in the chain of normal scams, according to Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn. “It is different and it’s an escalation in the leverage some of these criminals are trying to apply to unsuspecting victims,” Ahearn said. “They are using people in the background screaming and we think that an abundance of caution is needed and is appropriate. That’s why you call law enforcement immediately.” Reports of phone scam calls are common in Humboldt County, and they range from the caller claiming the target has a warrant out in their name and will be arrested unless they wire money to a location, to the scammer that claims the victim has won millions of dollars and needs to send money in order to claim the prize. They all have one thing in common — to separate the victim from their money. “We are always concerned with people sending money somewhere under false pretenses,” Ahearn said. “Use caution if you receive a call like that and then contact your local police department.” Ahearn said particularly when it comes to threats of violence, the best case is to call law enforcement and let them evaluate the information because it allows them to open a criminal investigation. The two calls that threatened violence were described “as very intense and realistic” and came from a number in Mexico. The caller was able to make the calls personal. “The scammers even go so far as to knowing the victim’s name and the name of the relative or loved one,” a news release issued Sunday from APD stated. “Similar scams have been documented throughout the United States.” Since the beginning of the year alone, reports of phone scams have come in from the Arcata Police Department, the Eureka Police Department, Superior Court of Humboldt County and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. It’s likely the reports will continue to roll in throughout the year. According to Samantha Karges, a spokesperson with the sheriff’s office, the agency has received dozens of phone scam reports in the past four or five months alone. “The most frequent scams we’ve been seeing are the following: Social Security scam, government official or law enforcement scam and computer-hacking scams,” Karges said in an email. “There were also the loved one is injured or kidnapped scam, we have seen a lot of this one recently.” There is no way to stop the phone scam calls, but the most important thing someone who is targeted can do is to not act on anything the scammer asks, refuse to send money and contact law enforcement. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.
20 Feb 19
Times-Standard
The callers have various ways in which they attempt to defraud a target of a phone scam. There are the IRS scams in which the target of the call is threatened with penalties if they don’t pay a fictitious bill. There are the ones aimed at grandparents where the scammer attempts to fool the target into believing a grandchild needs money for bail or some other emergency. Now, the calls and scams have escalated to threats of violence, kidnapping and even homicide. The Arcata Police Department issued a statement reporting the department has received two calls this month, phone calls that begin with a screaming voice followed by a male voice claiming they have kidnapped a relative and threatening to kill the relative unless a ransom has been paid. The threats of violence and murder are a step up in seriousness in the chain of normal scams, according to Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn. “It is different and it’s an escalation in the leverage some of these criminals are trying to apply to unsuspecting victims,” Ahearn said. “They are using people in the background screaming and we think that an abundance of caution is needed and is appropriate. That’s why you call law enforcement immediately.” Reports of phone scam calls are common in Humboldt County, and they range from the caller claiming the target has a warrant out in their name and will be arrested unless they wire money to a location, to the scammer that claims the victim has won millions of dollars and needs to send money in order to claim the prize. They all have one thing in common — to separate the victim from their money. “We are always concerned with people sending money somewhere under false pretenses,” Ahearn said. “Use caution if you receive a call like that and then contact your local police department.” Ahearn said particularly when it comes to threats of violence, the best case is to call law enforcement and let them evaluate the information because it allows them to open a criminal investigation. The two calls that threatened violence were described “as very intense and realistic” and came from a number in Mexico. The caller was able to make the calls personal. “The scammers even go so far as to knowing the victim’s name and the name of the relative or loved one,” a news release issued Sunday from APD stated. “Similar scams have been documented throughout the United States.” Since the beginning of the year alone, reports of phone scams have come in from the Arcata Police Department, the Eureka Police Department, Superior Court of Humboldt County and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. It’s likely the reports will continue to roll in throughout the year. According to Samantha Karges, a spokesperson with the sheriff’s office, the agency has received dozens of phone scam reports in the past four or five months alone. “The most frequent scams we’ve been seeing are the following: Social Security scam, government official or law enforcement scam and computer-hacking scams,” Karges said in an email. “There were also the loved one is injured or kidnapped scam, we have seen a lot of this one recently.” There is no way to stop the phone scam calls, but the most important thing someone who is targeted can do is to not act on anything the scammer asks, refuse to send money and contact law enforcement. Dan Squier can be reached at 707-441-0528.