Starbucks

25 Jun 19
The Daily Mae

Let’s face it: Life is tough. Sometimes we are standing on a mountain top, and sometimes we are deep in a valley. There have been plenty of times that I felt like I may never get out of those valleys that I had landed in because I saw no way out. Sometimes, I even pitched […]

25 Jun 19
Humans of University

Coming into college can be quite overwhelming; especially if you’re a first freshman and living on campus. There are so many things you have to adjust to; dorm life, roommates, new people, and the boatloads of assignments. Despite the chaotic circumstances of university, there is one thing you can do to make college worthwhile; get […]

25 Jun 19
Humans of University

Whether you were required to purchase a dining plan because you live in a campus or you just really enjoy Shafer Dining Court, there is so much more you can do with your dining plan than what the school advertises. 1. Dining Dollars These puppies are worth way more than the school gives them credit […]

25 Jun 19

notes left behind on a desk

Well – this is a fun morning. Went to take my daughter to her TA gig at the elementary school, and she wants Starbucks. I pull into a parking spot with the curb to the side. I then get stuck next to the curb and then try to go over the curb. My car is […]

25 Jun 19
Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (North Africa SUSI)

Hello Guys, So i really want to tell you about my first impression of the US, this ADRENALIN RUSH when you are landing on the US ground, actually it was a great feeling, when i arrived at the airport everything and i really mean everything was organized, when we arrived at first we saw the […]

25 Jun 19
IdeaMensch

Learn. There’s nothing you can’t do if you set your mind to it. Prioritize what the things you want to accomplish are, and go out and do them.   Ryan Chan is CEO and Founder at UpKeep Maintenance Management. He is a Chemical Engineer from UC Berkeley, was named one of Forbes 30 Under 30 […]

25 Jun 19
Thrive Global
Sure, many teachers feel the love during the last week of school, often in the form of Starbucks gift cards and Bath & Body Works baskets. They may even get a shout out during a graduation speech at the end of the year if they’re lucky. When Senator Kamala Harris released her plan to increase teacher pay, she introduced us to Frances Wilson, a teacher who made a lasting impression on her during childhood. She didn’t thank Wilson for teaching her methods to increase her standardized test scores, or credit the teacher’s lessons for her admission into a good college. She remembered Wilson for the “sense of hope and courage” she instilled during some of the most formative years of the senator’s life. The most consequential teachers don’t just provide our children with an education. They tell them how they can best use it. They help them realize their own potential, or how they can chart their own path forward. Our country’s educators are not just random strangers assigned to our child’s classroom for nine months. They are their role models and second parents. Teachers spend more time with our kids than anyone else — and during some of the most formative years of their lives. Learning state capitals and algebra equations are just the tip of the iceberg. Sometimes a teacher’s efforts are the catalyst for a presidential campaign, as is the case for Mrs. Wilson. Sometimes, the product is more subtle — but no less significant. I would know, because one very special educator changed the outcome for my son in a way I never could’ve myself. My eldest is 13-years-old. He is charming and outgoing, a solid athlete and talented waterman, happiest on his Opti sailboat. And now, he is a strong student — a phrase I never would’ve used to describe him only five years ago when his academic woes had our family in a state of crisis. My son was in second grade when we learned his brain worked a little bit different than most. He was struggling to learn how to read, falling further and further behind his classmates with each passing day. I could see him withdrawing from the classroom, losing his mojo and begging to come home early whenever he had the chance. His efforts to finish homework often turned to loud screams and frustrated cries before dinner was even on the table. I was at a loss — both my husband and I never struggled in school. We aced all of our standardized tests, graduated college and both held incredibly demanding, intellectual jobs. Teachers spend more time with our kids than anyone else — and during some of the most formative years of their lives. Learning state capitals and algebra equations are just the tip of the iceberg. How could this possibly be happening? I was sure he simply wasn’t trying hard enough. After a couple of tests, I wasn’t so sure anymore. As the school year came to a close, the school psychologist told us our son had a learning disability: he was dyslexic. I didn’t question the diagnosis itself — the counselor was absolutely right. My son did see words and letters differently, which greatly affected his ability to read. I wish, though, I had challenged the words she had used. Months later, when I had the privilege of first meeting Dr. Jay Russell of the Windward School, he put into words what I couldn’t all those years ago: my son did not suffer from a learning disability. He just learned differently. And he is not alone. Not even close. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, 1 in 5 people identify as having a learning difference. Contrary to popular belief, these differences have no impact on general intelligence. But when these children are misdiagnosed, or not diagnosed at all, problems arise. I think about kids I went to school with who disappeared as school became more and more challenging. They were called “slow” and left to fend for themselves in a one size fits all system. That could just as easily have been my own son. Likening these kinds of learning differences as weaknesses is a dangerous game. I know now that had I continued down that road, my son’s reading challenges would’ve quickly turned into disciplinary ones. There’s data to back this up, too: half of all students with learning disabilities are suspended during their schooling, while 1 in 3 are held back, 1 in 4 are depressed and 1 in 5 ultimately drop out. Dr. Russell knows the stakes are high. That’s why he has devoted his career to equipping teachers around the country with the tools to teach all students successfully — not just those who learn more traditionally. Dr. Jay Russell knew that my son wanted to learn — he just wasn’t in an environment that gave him the right resources to do so. This realization has made all of the difference for my son. I am always happy when he brings home a good grade on a math test, or finishes a book he was intimidated by when he started. These feats are no joke — and surely would not be possible without his teachers’ lessons. But I am most proud when I reflect on the young man my son is growing into. When I see those glimpses of the confident child he was before he was made to feel “less than” for his learning difference. And as much as I would like to take credit for his good character and confidence, I know I have his educators to thank —those men and women who are inspiring him to be the best he can be between the pop quizzes and homework checks. I am humbled by Dr. Jay Russell’s work: through one school, he has trained thousands of teachers to change the lives of students who learn differently. I know he is not the only one. This year, there were a whole lot of headlines about cutting corners in the hyper-competitive, academic race to the top. While some sunk to their lowest in effort to “be the best”, there were teachers across the country who plowed ahead, giving their students the foundations to succeed on and off paper. For some, that means four years at Amherst. For others, it may be admission into a vocational technology program, or a gap year spent hiking the Appalachian trail. We cannot predict the outcome for our children. But thanks to some incredible educators, we can end another school year knowing our children are better off than they were when they started. So, as summer vacation commences, I ask that you join me in thanking an educator that made this year special. Not just the ones who wrote your daughter a glowing recommendation to her dream school, or helped your son ace the final exam. I’m talking about the people who have made our children better. The men and women who have spent more waking hours with our kids than we have — and made a difference in the lives of you and your family as a result. Let’s recognize those teachers working tirelessly every single day to change the game for their students. I’d bet the impact of just a couple of kind words will last longer than any soap set on the shelf. This article originally appeared on nbcnews.com
25 Jun 19

Into the groove

Starbucks Red Cups Cause Controversy According to Starbucks, in the two decades since the first red Starbucks cup was introduced, the company has grown from 1,400 stores in a handful of countries to more than 23,000 stores in 68 markets around the world. Starbucks originated in Seattle’s historic Pike Place Market in 1971. Jeffrey Fields, […]

25 Jun 19

Friends! It’s currently 7am, and I am up and at the blog because I have officially locked myself out of my work computer. I had to reset my password yesterday, and it worked all day, and all of the sudden today, no dice. So while I wait for that to be reset, I might as […]

25 Jun 19
Family Adventure from Taipei to Auckland

Seattle has been a new city for us all to explore, and so far it has not disappointed. We are staying in a surburb which is a traditional leafy suburb, one floor houses, big American flags waving outside, and the Dodge van in the driveway. A short drive in to Vancouver along I-5 reveals a […]

25 Jun 19
News Directory

‘New Retail’. ‘Smart Retail '. ‘Boundaryless Retail’. The current evolution in China's retail and e-commerce sector has a number of different names, but in all cases, the use of technology to merge online and offline commerce is characterized. New Retail was called “New Retail” (Alizila), the most commonly used name to refer to this trend, […]

25 Jun 19
The Guelph Post

This is the sixth week of Open Access.

25 Jun 19
Financhill

The beauty of dividend stocks is the simplicity of getting paid just to own part of a business. Of course, investors can’t just seek out the highest yields and hit the martini bar. The cash distributions made by any business should be supported by a strong balance sheet, healthy cash flow, and intelligent capital investments. […]