Steel Panther

22 Mar 19
Art & Architecture Quarterly

Glenstone Museum Announces Spring 2019 Lineup New Art Installations Will Feature Works by Ellsworth Kelly, Kerry James Marshall, and Charles Ray  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Glenstone Museum announced that its first new art installations since opening the Pavilions in 2018 will feature two works by Ellsworth Kelly, on view starting today, and three works by Kerry James Marshall, […]

22 Mar 19
Archy news nety

Scowling to FKJ and Masego's "Tadow" is a rather nefarious task, but Winston Duke does not even smile when his sax stones and deformed keys cut the air out of a Midtown studio in New York. Marking the midpoint of the Black Boy Joy playlist edited for Spotify, the actor 6 "stares at the camera […]

22 Mar 19
Entertainment Epilogue

So I watched Captain Marvel. And these are my thoughts. For what it is, I enjoyed the film. The first movie set in the MCU to release after the death of Marvel creator Stan Lee, Captain Marvel is a female-led ’90s throwback Superhero movie. Starring alongside an orange cat and a digitally rejuvenated Samuel L. […]

22 Mar 19
Touchdown Wire

There are few things that can tank a franchise’s efforts more than a busted high draft pick. Plans for personnel and schematic success are drastically altered. Locker rooms can be poisoned. General managers and coaches can be fired, and if the draft pick is bad enough, their names can be held as toxic for years. […]

21 Mar 19
Dr.king powerfully house

What up everybody it your boy DR. king  powerfully and here to talk about  two superheroes and who will win this fight superman and wonder woman or Thor and hulk. I wanted to do this for a long time, but I did think nobody will get it. I want see it my “fans” can  answers […]

21 Mar 19
Archy news nety

0 of 32 Elise Amendola / Associated Press In the 201 NCAA men's tournament, coast to coast competitions are underway, as the first round is approaching its end. Check in here for the first round of previews and predictions from David Gardner, David Kenyon, Kerry Miller and Elliott Pohnl from Bleacher Report. If you missed […]

21 Mar 19
Arcynewsy

Albert Lea-raised designer, costumer reflects on career Before a former Albert Lea woman was building shin guards for Jason Momoa, she was clothing women in champagne bubbles. Stacia Lang, daughter of long-time Albert Lea residents Neil and Barb Lang, works as a specialty costume keyperson, among other roles, in Los Angeles. Her hands have built […]

20 Mar 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Press Telegram
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Daily Breeze
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Orange County Register
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Daily News
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Pasadena Star News
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Redlands Daily Facts
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Daily Bulletin
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”
20 Mar 19
Press Enterprise
ANAHEIM — Devin Shore on the Ducks’ power play? Shore centering a line? Nick Ritchie skating on a line with Ryan Getzlaf? Ritchie on the power play? Rickard Rakell on a penalty-killing unit? Rakell skating with Shore? The Ducks have stressed a need for stability since making a coaching change Feb. 10. Bob Murray, their general manager and interim coach since firing Randy Carlyle, has been willing to experiment. He has moved pieces around the chessboard and found answers to a few questions. Flexibility might be the buzzword as the Ducks’ season nears its end and Murray continues his ongoing evaluation of the roster as he prepares for an offseason that will include hiring a new coach and determining the makeup of next season’s roster. “As a coaching staff, we’ve talked about the stability of the lines staying together and letting them get to know each other better and get some confidence,” Ducks assistant Mark Morrison said. “I guess you could say we could tinker with stuff and there might be some units we like and maybe (Murray) likes them for longer than just the end of the season here.” Shore and Ritchie, in particular, have benefited from their expanded roles. Shore has scored twice on the power play in six games before the Ducks faced the Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday. Ritchie assisted on Shore’s power-play goal in the Ducks’ victory over the Florida Panthers on Sunday. “Yeah, it’s great,” a smiling Shore said when asked about his power-play duties. “Playing with Getzlaf and (Corey) Perry, two future Hall of Famers, it’s nice. You’ve just got to work hard and try to contribute. I think it’s just always being ready.” Of skating on a line with Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong, Ritchie said, “It’s always nice to get a chance to play with ‘Getzy.’ Me and ‘Spronger’ have done a decent job. We’ve had a few goals go in and, hopefully, we keep that going.” COACHING AUDITIONS? In addition to placing players in unfamiliar roles, Murray has given Morrison and fellow assistant Marty Wilford additional duties. Morrison and Wilford have run practices and worked more closely with the players in one-on-one situations than when Carlyle was the Ducks’ coach. “Most of them are his ideas, but we get to implement them,” Morrison said, referring to Murray, who also has delegated most, if not all, of the pregame and postgame sessions with reporters to his assistants. “We have more to do on the ice, more to do off the ice in meetings, for sure. “Both of us, Marty and myself, haven’t been there before in that role. It’s an experience for me and, for sure, I’m getting lots out of it. Loving it. Loving it. When you’re more involved with the group, you’re more involved with individual players, who are now asking you more questions.” COACHING (PART 2) Morrison, like Wilford, was an assistant in the AHL before he landed his current job with the Ducks. Morrison was an assistant coach with the Manitoba Moose, the Jets’ AHL team. Wilford was an assistant with the San Diego Gulls, the Ducks’ AHL club. “The biggest thing for me was I got to work with young players,” Morrison said. “Now the NHL is kind of becoming a younger league. Being able to work with young players in the American Hockey League isn’t a whole lot different than being able to work with young players in the NHL now. “We have Troy Terry up here and Max Jones and we’ve had Sam Steel, and they’re right out of the American Hockey League. Patience is the key word today.”