Steinberg

21 Apr 19
Studio Live Today

Best powered USB hubs for iPad and iPhone == Product Links == US – Anker 4-Port USB 3.0 powered hub – https://amzn.to/2DpMTTn CA – AmazonBasics 4 Port USB 3.0 powered hub – https://amzn.to/2Dq0Q3F UK – Atolla 4 Port powered USB 3.0 hub – https://amzn.to/2KPDSch AU – Belkin 4 Port powered USB 2.0 hub – https://amzn.to/2UtG2xJ […]

21 Apr 19
Starry Constellation Magazine

By: Jamie Steinberg     Sunday: Worst Cooks in America: Celebrity – Haute cuisine is not their forte. Join new celebrity recruits like Morgan Fairchild, Kym Whitley, Jimmie “JJ” Walker, Taryn Manning and more as they head into bootcamp. (Food Network, 9pm ET/PT) Madam Secretary – Elizabeth is ready to depart the state department in […]

21 Apr 19

Believe it or not, this is a more difficult question to answer than one might initially think. Interestingly, there is no agreed-upon definition in the research or among hospitals of what exactly constitutes an adolescent and young adult cancer patient/survivor. According to the National Cancer Institute, AYAs are young people who were diagnosed with cancer […]

21 Apr 19
Beethoven et les autres...

The context in which I discovered this recording is a bit peculiar, and probably explains the strong impression it has left me since then. Last Monday when I had just returned home after a long day of teaching to high school students, the first images of the cathedral Notre-Dame de Paris on fire invaded my […]

21 Apr 19
Bearable Giveaways

Ending Today: WIN Weedcraft Inc Ultimate Bundle! Ends 4/21 Wake and Bake’s #Healthy420 Giveaway – Ends 4/21 WIN Zoeva Screen Queen Complete Brush Set – Ends 4/21 Win A Steinberg Cubase Elements 10 License! Ends 4/21 4/20 Relaxation Giveaway! Ends 4/21 *NO Transportation There’s Something About Sweetie sweepstakes – Ends 4/21 WIN $20 Amazon Gift […]

21 Apr 19
High Velocity Sport

Drafting Patrick Mahomes: How the Chiefs outmaneuvered the NFL https://es.pn/2UvcYG4 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — In the moments leading up to the start of the 2017 NFL draft, sports agent Leigh Steinberg sat with relative calm at a party thrown by his client, Patrick Mahomes. The star quarterback from Texas Tech had opted to rent a […]

21 Apr 19
What's on Netflix

Netflix’s latest family drama’s first part has just landed on Netflix on April 15th and part 2 is already scheduled to be on the way. When will part 2 of No Good Nick be on Netflix and what can we expect from the next part? We’ll also take a look at the show’s chances of […]

21 Apr 19
Truth2Freedom's Blog

4 However, he was the one who lifted up our sicknesses, and he carried our pain, yet we ourselves assumed him stricken, struck down by God and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions, crushed because of our iniquities; the chastisement for our peace was upon him, and by his wounds ⌊we were healed⌋. 6 All […]

21 Apr 19
Redwood Times
In the 19th century thousands of Jewish families fled persecution in Europe, crossed the Atlantic Ocean traveling steerage class, and settled in urban areas along the east coast of the “Goldene Medina,” the Golden Land of America. Some brave and adventurous souls kept going west, making their way across this continent to our own redwood coast. As the next century rolled by, the small Jewish community in Humboldt County thrived. In 1954 Congregation Beth El was established to provide a spiritual home, with celebration of the Sabbath, High Holidays, weddings and bar mitzvahs. On the Congregation’s 50th anniversary in 2004, the Mayor of Eureka signed a proclamation in honor of the event: “I, Peter LaVallee, and on behalf of the City Council, extend my sincere appreciation to the Jewish professionals, merchants and other community members who have contributed to the quality of life in Eureka and Humboldt County.” In 2017 we had a Jubilee celebration for the Temple Beth El building and the special guests included Wiyot tribal member Cheryl Seidner, Pastor Dan Price, Judge Christopher Wilson, Supervisor Rex Bohn, and District Attorney Maggie Fleming. Compared to the widespread poverty and oppression in Europe, Jewish life in America has been a cornucopia of blessings. As a local rabbi I’ve been treated with courtesy and respect. It’s a joy and a privilege to share Jewish traditions with all who visit Temple Beth El. As a longtime member of the Humboldt Interfaith Fellowship and a participant in the True North Spiritual Leaders’ Caucus I enjoy deep, meaningful relationships with colleagues from other faith traditions. But the picture of Jewish life in Humboldt County is not entirely rosy. Like other minority populations we are sometimes stereotyped and harrassed. In my two and a half decades of service to Temple Beth El, from time to time I have the unpleasant duty of helping families and individuals deal with local expressions of antisemitism. Members of the Congregation have been subject to derogatory remarks and shocked by offensive materials circulated by locals online. Some incidents are simply the result of poor judgement or manifestations of implicit bias, the preferences and prejudices that are part of our subconscious thoughts but do not reflect our personal values. But some incidents involve malicious intent. I have heard of incidents in schools, business and professional settings, and neighborhoods. Prejudice against Jews may come from people on the political left, center or right, and from members of other minorities. County Counsel Jeffrey Blanck recently charged that he has been treated differently from other heads of County departments due to his Jewishness and his wife’s leadership in our local NAACP. This is a serious charge and must be addressed. We would like to think that the people working in County government ascribe to the highest values of fairness and impartiality, but it would be naive to assume that County government is immune to prejudice. Thankfully cases of antisemitic vandalism or threats to the safety of the Jewish community have been few and far between. When they do arise, we take them very seriously. We work closely with the Eureka Police Department and appreciate the support they offer. Over 150 representatives from diverse faith communities came together recently at a forum on safety in houses of worship where presenters included police chiefs of Arcata, Eureka and Fortuna, Sheriff Honsal, local and Bay Area agents from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Though all houses of worship are at risk, the dangers to synagogues, mosques and African-American churches was emphasized. I commend Office Enoch Ibarra for organizing the event. After the tragic shooting in a Pittsburg synagogue last fall, Temple Beth El appreciated strong support from the community at large at a memorial service led by Jeff Blanck, as I was in Toronto for the Parliament of the Worlds’ Religions. This winter we co-sponsored a series of programs with the NAACP and were pleased to have robust attendance. I feel confident that the vast majority of our fellow citizens respect our traditions and appreciate the role the Jewish community plays in Humboldt County. This is the Passover season when Jewish families gather for a special ritual meal and retell the ancient story of the Exodus, our ancestors escape from slavery in Egypt. In Hebrew the name for Egypt is Mitzrayim, meaning “the narrow place.” Only by liberating ourselves from narrow-mindedness and prejudice can we bring about the safe, wholesome society we all long to pass down to future generations. Rabbi Naomi Steinberg serves as the Rabbi for Temple Beth El in Eureka and B’nai ha-Aretz in Redway, and teaches classes on Judaism in the Religious Studies department at Humboldt State University.
21 Apr 19
Times-Standard
In the 19th century thousands of Jewish families fled persecution in Europe, crossed the Atlantic Ocean traveling steerage class, and settled in urban areas along the east coast of the “Goldene Medina,” the Golden Land of America. Some brave and adventurous souls kept going west, making their way across this continent to our own redwood coast. As the next century rolled by, the small Jewish community in Humboldt County thrived. In 1954 Congregation Beth El was established to provide a spiritual home, with celebration of the Sabbath, High Holidays, weddings and bar mitzvahs. On the Congregation’s 50th anniversary in 2004, the Mayor of Eureka signed a proclamation in honor of the event: “I, Peter LaVallee, and on behalf of the City Council, extend my sincere appreciation to the Jewish professionals, merchants and other community members who have contributed to the quality of life in Eureka and Humboldt County.” In 2017 we had a Jubilee celebration for the Temple Beth El building and the special guests included Wiyot tribal member Cheryl Seidner, Pastor Dan Price, Judge Christopher Wilson, Supervisor Rex Bohn, and District Attorney Maggie Fleming. Compared to the widespread poverty and oppression in Europe, Jewish life in America has been a cornucopia of blessings. As a local rabbi I’ve been treated with courtesy and respect. It’s a joy and a privilege to share Jewish traditions with all who visit Temple Beth El. As a longtime member of the Humboldt Interfaith Fellowship and a participant in the True North Spiritual Leaders’ Caucus I enjoy deep, meaningful relationships with colleagues from other faith traditions. But the picture of Jewish life in Humboldt County is not entirely rosy. Like other minority populations we are sometimes stereotyped and harrassed. In my two and a half decades of service to Temple Beth El, from time to time I have the unpleasant duty of helping families and individuals deal with local expressions of antisemitism. Members of the Congregation have been subject to derogatory remarks and shocked by offensive materials circulated by locals online. Some incidents are simply the result of poor judgement or manifestations of implicit bias, the preferences and prejudices that are part of our subconscious thoughts but do not reflect our personal values. But some incidents involve malicious intent. I have heard of incidents in schools, business and professional settings, and neighborhoods. Prejudice against Jews may come from people on the political left, center or right, and from members of other minorities. County Counsel Jeffrey Blanck recently charged that he has been treated differently from other heads of County departments due to his Jewishness and his wife’s leadership in our local NAACP. This is a serious charge and must be addressed. We would like to think that the people working in County government ascribe to the highest values of fairness and impartiality, but it would be naive to assume that County government is immune to prejudice. Thankfully cases of antisemitic vandalism or threats to the safety of the Jewish community have been few and far between. When they do arise, we take them very seriously. We work closely with the Eureka Police Department and appreciate the support they offer. Over 150 representatives from diverse faith communities came together recently at a forum on safety in houses of worship where presenters included police chiefs of Arcata, Eureka and Fortuna, Sheriff Honsal, local and Bay Area agents from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Though all houses of worship are at risk, the dangers to synagogues, mosques and African-American churches was emphasized. I commend Office Enoch Ibarra for organizing the event. After the tragic shooting in a Pittsburg synagogue last fall, Temple Beth El appreciated strong support from the community at large at a memorial service led by Jeff Blanck, as I was in Toronto for the Parliament of the Worlds’ Religions. This winter we co-sponsored a series of programs with the NAACP and were pleased to have robust attendance. I feel confident that the vast majority of our fellow citizens respect our traditions and appreciate the role the Jewish community plays in Humboldt County. This is the Passover season when Jewish families gather for a special ritual meal and retell the ancient story of the Exodus, our ancestors escape from slavery in Egypt. In Hebrew the name for Egypt is Mitzrayim, meaning “the narrow place.” Only by liberating ourselves from narrow-mindedness and prejudice can we bring about the safe, wholesome society we all long to pass down to future generations. Rabbi Naomi Steinberg serves as the Rabbi for Temple Beth El in Eureka and B’nai ha-Aretz in Redway, and teaches classes on Judaism in the Religious Studies department at Humboldt State University.
21 Apr 19
Ready To Role Podcast

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-msvxt-aea85d Taking a Bite Out of Time HAPPY EASTER!!! After getting everything lined out and ready to go in Copsenhagen, the guys FINALLY decide to go north to Steinberg.  But along the way, they come across something big in the forest.  But are they ready for whatever waits for them in the forest?  Will they […]

21 Apr 19
God's Healing Plants

HISTORY The first historical account of walnut cultivation dates back to Babylon (now Iraq) circa 2000 B.C. The English walnut originated in the regions surrounding the Caspian Sea, hence it is known as the Persian walnut. In the 4th century AD, the ancient Romans introduced the walnut into many European countries where it has been […]

20 Apr 19
Brandy N. Carie

My play TOMORROW GAME won the Kennedy Center’s Harold and Mimi Steinberg National Student Playwriting Award, which comes with a big cash prize, option to publish, and the invitation to attend this weeks Student Playwriting Festival–which I did! And I’m so happy to have met so many wonderful playwrights, directors, and dramaturgs, as well as […]

20 Apr 19
The Denver Post
Before they could celebrate their new partnership two winters ago, Patrick Mahomes and agent Leigh Steinberg needed to have one final talk over dinner at a restaurant in Tyler, Texas. Steinberg warned Mahomes of the potential pitfalls his impending fame would bring, and with the 2017 NFL draft just a few months away, he asked Mahomes if there was anything about his past that he should know about. Then he told Mahomes that there was one final step he needed to complete before the quarterback’s draft process could truly begin: The agent would conduct one last scan of Mahomes’s social media accounts. The audit turned up nothing, as Steinberg expected, and Mahomes would go onto become a top-10 pick of the Kansas City Chiefs that spring and a league MVP by his second season. But it was a reminder that, even for prospects with squeaky-clean online images like Mahomes, there is a new rite of passage during the evaluation process this time of year. Old tweets, Snapchats and Instagram posts are being reviewed and dissected, and can be as influential to a player’s draft stock as his 40-yard dash or vertical jump. “Teams are looking at Twitter and Facebook and Instagram as another research tool,” Steinberg said. “[The players] get to explain whatever it was, but they are being held to account on postings, pictures. This didn’t even exist 15 years ago. It’s a big change, because some players are under the illusion that when they post on social media, it’s like going to their friends in a private form of communication. But it’s an international broadcast system.” In 2016, offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil was a projected top-five pick, but fell to No. 13 after someone hacked his Twitter account minutes before the draft and posted a picture of Tunsil smoking out of a bong with a gas mask on. Last spring, racist tweets sent by Wyoming quarterback Josh Allen surfaced, and the story consumed the day of the draft. Allen apologized for the tweets, which he had sent when he was in high school, before being drafted seventh overall that night by the Buffalo Bills. Now agents and teams are vetting the accounts of top prospects more fervently than ever in the run-up to this month’s NFL draft, and two of this class’s top prospects have already seen their social media pasts come under fire. On the night he won the Heisman Trophy in December, Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray – who is widely expected to be drafted first overall by the Arizona Cardinals – was forced to issue an apology after homophobic tweets from years earlier came to light. In March, Ohio State defensive end Nick Bosa told an ESPN reporter that he deleted a string of tweets from his past – including those supporting President Donald Trump and one calling former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick “a clown” – because he could very well be drafted by the 49ers with the No. 2 overall pick. The latter move not only underscores what is potentially at stake for a player of Bosa’s stature in one of America’s most progressive cities, but also highlights the delicate balance between an outspoken player’s freedom of speech and the possible rift it could cause in an NFL locker room. “It kind of lets you into a guy’s life off the field at times,” NFL agent Shawn O’Dare said. “[Teams] are doing every research possible. They’re making multimillion dollar investments into these guys. It’s easy for them to go through their social media and find a red flag if there is one.” The cases of Allen and Murray in particular followed a familiar pattern in pro sports in 2018, where a number of high-profile athletes had homophobic, racist and misogynistic tweets from their past surface. Brewers pitcher Josh Hader, Braves pitcher Sean Newcomb and Nationals shortstop Trea Turner all apologized for racist and homophobic tweets – each sent from their high school days – and former Villanova guard Donte DiVincenzo deleted his Twitter account after a string of racist and homophobic tweets from his teenage years emerged during his team’s win over Michigan in the 2018 national championship game. Most athletes who are exposed have at least in part chalked up the exposed tweets to youth in their apologies, but it has nonetheless spurred more awareness within NFL circles during the draft process. More and more prospects are scrubbing their own accounts. Agents such as Steinberg have devoted more resources to evaluating social media accounts over the past several years; Steinberg dispatches a couple of assistants at his agency to scan Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn profiles of clients after they have signed. NFL teams now routinely include a thorough review of social media during the pre-draft process and consider it a crucial part of a player’s background check – including devoting staffers to scanning the accounts while the players are freshmen and sophomores, before they’re even old enough to declare for the draft. “By this point, it’s too late,” said Daniel Jeremiah, a draft analyst for the NFL Network. “Most of the teams have already done that work well before these guys are even draft eligible. . . . Especially after the Tunsil thing, there’s really no excuse not to be prepared for everything. If you’re smart you will have addressed this with all the teams and would have been up front about it before now.” In 2012, when Jeremiah was a scout with the Philadelphia Eagles, the front office completely removed a player from their board after discovering photos of guns on his social media accounts. “We didn’t interview him,” Jeremiah said. “We didn’t bother doing any homework on him. We were just like, ‘He’s off our board, he’s done.'” Major college programs are trying to get ahead of that curve, often bringing in social media consultants to address the issue. One of those consultants, Kevin DeShazo, has spoken to more than 200 college teams and often points to the case of Tunsil in the 2016 draft as a prime example of how it can affect a future. “That drop to the 13th pick lost him a projected 20 million dollars. So no matter what he does in life — he’s doing well, he’s doing great in the NFL – that 20 million dollars is not going to come back,” DeShazo said. “So it’s letting student athletes know: Is it worth the risk? Is that joke you want to tell, is that picture you want to put up, is it telling the best version of you?” The campaign to make prospects more aware has even permeated the high school level, including at two elite programs in the Washington area that have produced NFL players. Over the past five years at DeMatha High School in Hyattsville, Maryland, for example, former head coach Elijah Brooks, who recently was hired as an assistant at the University of Maryland, said he had assigned a couple of assistant coaches to create aliases and monitor players’ social media posts. At Wise High School in Prince George’s County, Maryland, Coach DaLawn Parrish often will review his players’ tweets at night. If he doesn’t like what he sees, he will call them right away and tell them to take it down, he said. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The message got through to one of his top recruits, Isaiah Hazel, who will play for the University of Maryland this fall. More than four years ago, Hazel said he erased six tweets from his childhood after Parrish talked to the team about the potential perils of social media and how it can affect recruiting. “Before I played football, you know, I’m young, I’m just tweeting anything, saying anything, retweeting anything. When colleges look at you, it’s bigger than that,” Hazel said in an interview last summer. “They want to see how you are as a man, how you carry yourself on social media . . . when you think they’re not looking.” Everyone is now looking at Mahomes, who has 1.2 million followers on Instagram and nearly half a million on Twitter. He is the poster boy for what Steinberg wants his clients to be on and off the field, and also in the digital realm, where he has used his accounts to grow his brand considerably. But there was a time when he had to pass the pre-draft test like everyone else. And with another draft day approaching, even with the heightened awareness across all levels of football, Steinberg is convinced there will be more cautionary tales to come. “It’s almost inevitable,” Steinberg said. “The level of scrutiny that the contemporary draftees are under is exponentially higher.”