Tesla Roadster

21 May 19
Electrek
BMW is leaning toward making its next-generation i8 sports car an all-electric model, according to a new report. The carmaker is in the midst of making a decision on the direction it will take with its next i8, and higher-ups “are now said to be favoring a pure-electric model,” Autocar reports. While it’s been believed that BMW would keep the i8 as a plug-in hybrid moving forward, Autocar writes about “the development of an alternative plan under which the next i8 would adopt a newly developed pure-electric drivetrain.” That plan would involve a “new high-torque pure-electric driveline,” which would position the i8 to compete with cars like the Tesla Roadster. There aren’t many details about this new driveline, but it may share “key elements” with the BMW iNext all-electric crossover. BMW is also said to be developing a new electric motor. Prototype versions of that motor have reportedly been tested in i8 mules. Interestingly, Autocar notes that “the new motor has been conceived to provide future BMWs with the high-revving characteristics of the company’s combustion-engined cars.” BMW may also consider changing the car’s platform to something more resembling what the iNEXT will use. Further adding to the ambiguity of BMW’s looming decision on the sports car, Autocar reports the i8 could go completely in the other direction: BMW’s head of development also indicated the new i8 could receive a four- or six-cylinder combustion engine in place of the three-cylinder petrol unit in use today: “Then it will be very soon in the 600bhp-or-something region and it will not have a weight of two tonnes.” BMW is expected to finalize its decision later this year as the company plans to introduce the new i8 by 2023. Electrek’s Take There are still a lot of unknowns here, and based on this report, BMW is still considering many options when it comes to the direction of the i8. While we wouldn’t jump to conclusions just yet, there are some positive signs. But considering the length of the timeline — the car won’t be introduced for another four years — we wonder why BMW wouldn’t make it all-electric. Going in any other direction wouldn’t make much sense. As we stressed in our review of the BMW i8 Roadster, we couldn’t stop thinking about how great the i8 would be as an all-electric car. It seems like a natural fit to us, and we’d really like BMW to go down that path.
21 May 19
Idrisidris

Bilio the Boy Scout was steaming mad. That little baby had tricked him! He had felt the strange need to suddenly hand over his IPhone, and she had soaked it! And the worst part was, he couldn’t even move to stop her! Bilio paced along the lane of Wal-Maart, trying to figure out why he […]

21 May 19
Connor's Blog

Here’s my final review…I am going to be leaving what seems to be permanently from my blog page. This isn’t the goodbye blog but it’s leading up to it. But before any emotions are felt, I did want to write one, last epic review. As seen earlier in my blogs I am seriously infatuated with […]

20 May 19
Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) Worldwide Blog

By Steve Schaeber, MACS Technical Editor (May 20, 2019) ©2019 Mobile Air Conditioning Society Worldwide As part of our continuing effort to document the industry’s changeover to R-1234yf, MACS once again attended the Philadelphia Auto Show to see the new models, open a few (actually all of the) hoods, and see what refrigerant is being […]

20 May 19
Electrek
Tesla has released new ‘Do It Yourself’ maintenance procedure instructions to help owners work on their own cars.  Over the last few years, Tesla has said that it’s working on opening up its service tools and helping owners repair their own cars, but we haven’t seen much evidence of that — though things have been slowly moving in the right direction. Last year, Tesla released the parts catalog for Model 3, Model S, Model X and Roadster to the public. Now Tesla is also releasing a series of new instructions for ‘Do It Yourself’ procedures for Model 3 vehicles. The automaker says that owners could avoid having to go to service centers: “Tesla owners who wish to perform basic procedures or maintenance on their vehicle can do so without having to schedule a Service appointment. Only perform a procedure if you feel comfortable doing so, and always follow all provided instructions.” Most of the procedures consist of fairly simple maintenance or troubleshooting: Restarting the Touchscreen Pairing a Bluetooth Phone Connecting to Wi-Fi Programming HomeLink® Adding and Removing Keys Replacing the Key Fob Battery Installing Phone Charging Cable Installing Front License Plate Bracket Replacing Cabin Filters Checking and Adjusting Tire Pressures Topping Up Windshield Washer Fluid Replacing Wiper Blades Manually Releasing Charge Cable Calibrating Windows Removing and Installing Aero Covers Removing and Installing Lug Nut Covers Some things, like replacing cabin filters are a little more intricate and would have generally been handled by the service center. Tesla released step-by-step instructions, which includes removing some panels and screws, as well as a gif: Tesla has put a lot of emphasis on the air quality inside its vehicles. One of Tesla’s goals is to improve overall quality by accelerating the adoption of electric vehicles, but Tesla owners who are doing their part should also enjoy good air quality in their own cars. With the Model X, Tesla put a lot of effort into developing a more powerful air filtering system in order to not only contribute to the reduction of local air pollution with electric vehicles but also to reduce the direct impact of air pollution on the occupants of its vehicles. Musk credited Google co-founder Larry Page for turning him onto the idea and with the Model X in 2015, Tesla introduced a brand new HEPA air filter system. The automaker claims that it is about 10 times larger than a normal car filter (pictured above) and it is “100 times more effective than premium automotive filters” as it removes “at least 99.97% of fine particulate matter and gaseous pollutants, as well as bacteria, viruses, pollen and mold spores.” Tesla later introduced the same filter for Model S, but CEO Elon Musk says that there wasn’t enough space in Model 3 to have the same filter. Nonetheless, the CEO claims Model 3 is equipped with the best air filtration system that can fit and it can have similar capabilities if you filter the air through several times. Musk said: “Set air flow to recirculating mode & manually raise blower speed to 5 in Model 3 for best air quality. Air filters are smaller than S/X, so clear air is achieved by circulating through filter several times.” If owners decide to do that, the air filter will wear faster, but now they can change it themselves with the new instructions released by Tesla. Electrek’s Take I think they still have a long way to go, but Tesla is clearly going in the right direction when it comes to helping owners take care of their own cars. The biggest issue is still likely access to parts. Tesla needs to make it easier for owners to be able to buy parts that they need and reduce the lead time. It’s something that Tesla claims to have been working on for a long time, but we haven’t seen much progress. Let us know if you have recent experience with Tesla’s service and parts departments.
20 May 19
Better than Okay

We start out talking about the possibility of spending a month or two here. Maybe early winter. “I want to be there long enough to actually experience it,” I say, stubbornly. ‘What’s that gonna take?” Bobby sounds exasperated. “You know. Long enough to make friends. Get to know people. I don’t want to just take […]

20 May 19
THE REPUBLICAN NEWS

Greg Kable BMW is on the verge of making the next generation of its flagship i8 sports car a fully electric model, according to sources at the firm. Bosses are at a crucial decision-making stage with the next i8 and senior officials at the German car maker are now said to be favouring a pure-electric […]

20 May 19
Hackaday
When it comes to SpaceX, or perhaps more accurately its somewhat eccentric founder and CEO Elon Musk, it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction. For as many incredible successes SpaceX has had, there’s an equal number of projects or ideas which get quietly delayed or shelved entirely once it becomes clear the technical challenges are greater than anticipated. There’s also Elon’s particular brand of humor to contend with; most people assumed his claim that the first Falcon Heavy payload would be his own personal Tesla Roadster was a joke until he Tweeted the first shots of it being installed inside the rocket’s fairing. So a few years ago when Elon first mentioned Starlink, SpaceX’s plan for providing worldwide high-speed Internet access via a mega-constellation of as many as 12,000 individual satellites, it’s no surprise that many met the claims with a healthy dose of skepticism. The profitability of Starlink was intrinsically linked to SpaceX’s ability to substantially lower the cost of getting to orbit through reusable launch vehicles, a capability the company had yet to successfully demonstrate. It seemed like a classic cart before the horse scenario. But today, not only has SpaceX begun regularly reusing the latest version of their Falcon 9 rocket, but Starlink satellites will soon be in orbit around the Earth. They’re early prototypes that aren’t as capable as the final production versions, and with only 60 of them on the first launch it’s still a far cry from thousands of satellites which would be required for the system to reach operational status, but there’s no question they’re real. During a media call on May 15th, Elon Musk let slip more technical information about the Starlink satellites than we’ve ever had before, giving us the first solid details on the satellites themselves, what the company’s goals are, and even a rough idea when the network might become operational. Launching the First Generation Elon reiterated several times that these satellites will be the first of at least three generations of satellites which will eventually make up the Starlink network. They’re closer to the final satellites than the Tintin A and Tintin B technology demonstrators launched in 2018, but still lacking key features which will be necessary for optimum performance. The first 1,600 Starlink satellites as reported to the FCC. The biggest omission with these early satellites is the lack of inter-vehicle laser communication links, which means each satellite will have to relay everything through ground stations. In other words, if a Starlink satellite wants to send data to one of its peers, it will have to send it down to a ground station which then routes the information over the terrestrial Internet to another ground station that’s in range of the recipient. This not only increases latency, but requires a large number of ground stations located all over the globe. To solve this problem, Elon says later versions of the Starlink satellites will use laser communications to form interconnected links, creating a mesh network in space. Data won’t always have to be sent to the Earth and back, and instead can be routed through the satellite network. Of course, ground stations will still be required to ultimately get data to and from the Internet itself, but far fewer of them will be needed and their geographic location will be less critical. This technology, which allows global communications with little to no ground infrastructure, could also be applied to satellite constellations orbiting the Moon or Mars; something SpaceX is almost certainly thinking about on the long-term. In addition, Elon reiterated that these first 60 satellites don’t feature the “Design for Demise” optimizations which were implemented after the Federal Communications Commission’s expressed concerns over SpaceX’s inability to guarantee that debris from reentering Starlink satellites could be safely contained over the ocean. In their response to the FCC, SpaceX promised that future versions of the satellites would be designed in such a way that they would entirely burn up during reentry, removing any risk that falling debris endangering human life or property. Experimental Technology These first generation Starlink satellites might be missing some key features, but they aren’t exactly placeholders either. While we’ll have to wait awhile before we see laser communication or fully degradable construction, they definitely have some unique capabilities that will likely get the attention of other aerospace players if they prove successful. According to Elon, these satellites are the first vehicles to ever use a krypton-powered ion drive in space. This type of propulsion was experimented with by NASA back in the early 1990’s, but never progressed into operational status as it was found to be less efficient than similar thrusters powered by xenon. That said, krypton is cheaper than xenon, and with low-cost satellites that are only expected to make occasional orbit adjustments during their relatively short lifespans, using a lower efficiency propellant actually made more economical sense. On the subject of orbital adjustments, these satellites will also be testing an autonomous obstacle avoidance system which is sure to be of interest given the ever-increasing concerns over “space junk” in low Earth orbit. The satellites will receive orbital debris data from a NORAD database and use that information to decide on their own whether they should perform evasive maneuvers. Traditionally such decisions are made by ground controllers, but with tens of thousands of satellites in the final Starlink network, SpaceX reasoned this was a task that could benefit from automation. Shipping and Handling Learning more about the technical aspects of the satellites themselves is interesting, but probably the biggest question most people have about Starlink was just how SpaceX intends to hoist 12,000 satellites into orbit within the next couple of years. For reference, since the launch of Sputnik 1 in 1957, humanity has put fewer than 9,000 objects into orbit around the Earth. Viewed in that light, one could argue that a satellite constellation of Starlink’s proposed size would represent a new milestone in mankind’s utilization of space. The reusability of the Falcon 9 was a huge piece of the puzzle, but it still wouldn’t be economically feasible unless SpaceX could maximize the number of satellites that could go up in each launch. To that end, they came up with a novel “flat-pack” design for the Starlink satellites. Inside the payload fairing, the satellites are stored in an arrangement not unlike a server rack, and when deployed they unfold their solar arrays and antennas into operational position. Elon admitted there’s a chance a few of them might bounce into each other on the way out, but said that it wasn’t expected to cause any serious issues given how low their relative speeds will be. With 60 satellites weighing 227 kilograms each, plus the weight of ancillary hardware like the rack itself, this first Starlink launch tips the scales at 18.5 tons; the most mass a Falcon has ever put into orbit. Even still, Elon said it will cost SpaceX more to launch the Starlink satellites than it did to build them in the first place. So How Do You Sign Up? Unfortunately, we didn’t learn a whole lot about when and how consumers can actually sign up for Starlink Internet service. In the best case scenario, Elon estimated it would take another six launches before the network could even be activated, and twelve to provide enough coverage for it to be usable. After that, SpaceX will begin looking for commercial partners to actually start selling Internet service and distributing their phased-array terminals, likely with rural customers to begin with. At least for now it seems like SpaceX would rather partner with traditional ISPs than go to war with them, which will probably come as a disappointment to those who hoped Elon would shake up the telecommunications industry. Satellite coverage renderings taken from Mark Handley’s excellent video about Starlink.
20 May 19
News Archives Uk

When it comes to SpaceX, or more precisely its slightly eccentric founder and CEO Elon Musk, it can be difficult to separate facts from fictions. So many incredible achievements SpaceX had, so many projects or ideas are tacitly postponed or suspended as soon as it becomes clear that the technical challenges are greater than expected. […]

20 May 19
VOICE OF THE HWY

When it comes to SpaceX, or perhaps more accurately its somewhat eccentric founder and CEO Elon Musk, it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction. For as many incredible successes SpaceX has had, there’s an equal number of projects or ideas which get quietly delayed or shelved entirely once it becomes clear the technical […]

20 May 19
Doug's Cars, Drones, Robots and Gadgets

via Tesla Roadster Takes On Top Fuel Dragster: Simulated Race Video

19 May 19
The School Blogger

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com Brand Position when it comes to Tesla is an interesting conversation to be had. Tesla put themselves in a unique position by not only creating but also continuing to be the leader in the luxury electric car market. Founder Elon Musk has taken Tesla and turned it into not only […]

19 May 19
Throttled Life

Overt from the rare public photos and media limelight, Halldora von Koenigsegg prefers Christian to be the center of the Koenigsegg Universe. However, Halldora von Koenigsegg is the Chief Operating Officer of Koenigsegg and equally shares the Angelholm dream with her husband. Despite the perks of being a hypercar wife, she plays a major role […]

19 May 19
Ride

Who will be the first company to build an electric pickup truck, we weigh-in with expert knowledge based on years of experience