The Nature Conservancy

25 Mar 19
Bon Bon Lifestyle Group

The second generation Niepoort in Lalique 1863 decanter sold for HK$1,054,000 at The Nature Conservancy Gala in Hong Kong Check more: https://ift.tt/2FxKuYk

25 Mar 19
Bon Bon Lifestyle Webazine

The second generation Niepoort in Lalique 1863 decanter sold for HK$1,054,000 at The Nature Conservancy Gala in Hong Kong Check more: https://ift.tt/2FxKuYk

25 Mar 19
Muruma Kelvin

The coca cola company has rolled out a  program to provide clean and safe water to six million people around the world, 400 000  Kenyans,  thjat will amount to sh. 3.5 billion. The initiative will entail laying pipes and construction of storage facilities in Isiolo, Kitui, Kisumu, Nairobi, Naivasha, Nakuru and Mombasa, Maragua, Sagana and […]

25 Mar 19
Backcountry Outdoors Canada

I’ve heard about the Swift fox making a return to certain areas of North America on the Meat Eater podcast hosted by well know outdoor personality Steve Rinella (host of Meat Eater tv show and podcast). I didn’t know much about the species at all, when I did some reading I found them to be […]

24 Mar 19
State of Globe

New information has come to light in regard to the Clintons and Branson’s affairs with the Caribbean Islands. Several more players have boarded this ship, including Bill Gates, The World Bank, Virgin Unite, Digicel, The Nature Conservancy, Tides, and numerous others. Generating millions in funds to erect small solar farms, was just the appetizer. These […]

24 Mar 19
NATION AND STATE

New information has come to light in regard to the Clintons and Branson’s affairs with the Caribbean Islands. Several more players have boarded this ship, including Bill Gates, The World Bank, Virgin Unite, Digicel, The Nature Conservancy, Tides, and numerous others. Generating millions in funds to erect small solar farms, was just the appetizer. These […]

23 Mar 19
Monterey Herald
CARMEL — A “landmark” initiative aimed at restoring Carmel River floodplain habitat and helping reduce flood risks for homes and businesses along the lower part of the river and lagoon has reached a key phase with the release of its environmental review document. A combined environmental impact report and environmental assessment for the project dubbed the Carmel FREE (floodplain restoration and environmental enhancement) project backed by Monterey County and the Big Sur Land Trust was released March 8 and will be available for a 45-day public review, including  comment period through April 22. The 654-page document, along with seven technical reports, outlines the environmental impacts, potential alternatives and proposed mitigations of the proposed $33.2 million project, which is backed by a partnership between Monterey County and the Big Sur Land Trust. Prompted by the devastating floods of 1995 and 1998 when the Carmel River bridge was destroyed amid massive flooding that caused tens of millions of dollars in damage to property, and the subsequent donation of 128 acres from the Odello East Fields property by Clint and Margaret Eastwood for floodplain restoration, the project is described by the Big Sur Land Trust as “one of the most extensive and important multi-benefit flood protection and riparian habitat restoration efforts on the Central Coast.” Cows graze on Odello East land in 2016. (Monterey Herald file) Big Sur Land Trust’s Rachel Saunders called release of the project’s environmental review document a “huge milestone” that will help with pursuing additional funding for the project, which has already secured $10.2 million and needs another $23 million. The Big Sur Land Trust is also seeking $2 million in funding for long-term maintenance of the project anticipated to cost about $100,000 per year. The project employs what the Big Sur Land Trust calls a “nature-based approach to flood control, also called ‘green infrastructure’ ” that it argued is considered an “environmentally preferable solution” to reconstructing levees and flood walls along the river. Restored floodplains “act as sponges for water,” according to the Big Sur Land Trust, and will also improve groundwater recharge and water quality. It includes two main components – a floodplain restoration and a causeway addition. The floodplain restoration includes removing part of the earthen levees on the south side of the river; grading to restore the project site’s ecological function as a floodplain; grading to lift about 23 acres of farmland above the 100-year floodplain level to create an agricultural preserve; and implementation of a restoration management plan for the restored historic 100-acre floodplain site through replanting of native vegetation including willows, cottonwoods, grasslands and wetlands to create a “mosaic” of restored habitat, as well as maintenance, monitoring and reporting protocols. A map pointing out the locations of the improvements can be found at https://bit.ly/2TqLIYM The causeway addition includes replacing a part of the Highway 1 roadway embankment with a causeway section designed to accommodate flood flows and restore “hydrologic connectivity” between the floodplain restoration site and the Carmel River lagoon, creating an enhanced fish habitat. It would also include a southbound turn lane at the Palo Corona Regional Park entrance. When completed, the project is expected to save the county about $14 million in potential flood control costs, and could also save property owners on their flood insurance premiums, according to the Big Sur Land Trust Odello artichoke field off Highway 1 south of Carmel circa 1950s. (Monterey County Herald Archives) Previously expected to cost $25 million and start construction last year, the project’s cost has risen as a result of delays, including the need for more extensive environmental review and proposed mitigation, as well as increased construction costs, according to Saunders. In addition, some of the project’s previously secured grants have expired, Saunders said, reducing available funding by about a third from $15 million. Saunders noted the county and land trust have already applied for $23 million in hazard mitigation funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency through the state Office of Emergency Services. The project is now expected to begin construction in late 2020 or early 2021, depending on when full funding is available and permitting is completed, and take about two years to finish, county special programs manager Melanie Beretti said. Project partners include California State Parks, the Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District, and the state Department of Transportation. Funding sources so far include the state Coastal Conservancy, state Wildlife Conservation Board, state Department of Water Resources, Caltrans, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The environmental review document is available online at https://bit.ly/2U3kv2L, as well as for purchase at the county Resource Management Agency’s Schilling Place offices in Salinas, and can be viewed at the following area libraries: Carmel Valley Library, Monterey Public Library, and Harrison Memorial Library in Carmel. Public hearings on the environmental document will be scheduled after the public review period has concluded, and a final document will be prepared.
23 Mar 19
SCNG
A little pond named after a farmer’s wife that became a birding hotspot was the topic at the Redlands Conservancy’s Life in a Puddle walk on Saturday, March 23. Megan Brousseau, Associate Director of Inland Empire Waterkeeper, and an expert on freshwater habitats, discussed water management and conservation at Beverley[cq comment=”cq”] Pond at the San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary in Redlands. It had been a marshy depression for centuries. Farmer and former Mayor Bill Cunningham, who named it, now provides water for it according to Sherli Leonard, the conservancy’s executive director. #gallery-1710763-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1710763-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1710763-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1710763-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ The Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) Megan Brousseau, Associate Director of Inland Empire Waterkeeper speaks with visitors during the Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) The Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) A Canadian Goose in Beverley Pond, during the Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) Canadian Geese landing in Beverley Pond, during the Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) The Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) Lucas McCracken-Curran, 8, of Mentone, looks through microscope during the Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) Lucas McCracken-Curran, 8, of Mentone, looks through microscope during the Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) The Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) The Redlands Conservancy tour of Beverley Pond at its San Timoteo Nature Sanctuary. Migrating water birds, aquatic creatures and plants have quickly made the pond their home. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (Photo by Frank Perez, Contributing Photographer) [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Redlands loses a treasure, Beverley Cunningham passes away Foundation Spotlight: Inland Empire Waterkeeper urges all to learn about, swim in Santa Ana River Redlands City Council may hear appeal of San Timoteo Canyon Nature Sanctuary parking lot Families explore art under the oaks at Redlands ranch [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] After it filled up with silt and cattails, the conservancy deepened the pond to keep some open water. “Pretty soon we had geese. We had ducks. We had egrets.  We had herons,” Leonard said. “In fact birders were labeling it on the internet as a birding hot spot,” identifying 150 different species of birds. Though the pond’s drain recently failed leaving little water left in the wetlands, the conservancy is working on building a new outlet, which will take a few years.
23 Mar 19
Catskills Trout Tales

Mention Catskills Trout Tales when booking your reservation for a stay in April or May 2019 and receive your choice of free firewood for your campfire (normally $10/dozen), or a free extended checkout time of 5pm (normally $25). Pepacton Cabins offers Catskill Mt. style, cozy well-equipped cabins for rent on the banks of the East […]

23 Mar 19
Serene Disciple Project

For the last several weeks I’ve been writing about the Thomas Merton poem from which we get the name the Serene Disciple Project, but after last week’s newsletter, I received some very good questions about what we do here on the farm and decided to take a break and answer them. While I have previously […]