Travis Scott

19 Feb 19
SA Diaries

It is not so long ago when the rumour that former Generations actress Thulisile Phongolo had engaged to a business mogul broke the internet. Phongolo was reported to be in a relationship with former Muvhango actor Raphael Griffiths and later dumped him for a better, wealthier man. According to Sunday Sun, Thuli was spoiled rotten […]

19 Feb 19
Friends for Life!

Pastor of Harvest Bible Chapel Naples Asks for His Church Back in Wake of James MacDonald Controversy Posted in Uncategorized by Julie Roys John Secrest, the founding pastor of Harvest Bible Chapel Naples, today announced that he wants his church back. In an email to his congregation, Secrest said that he had asked top leadership […]

19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
WASHINGTON — President Trump has now accepted a scaled-down payment, at least momentarily, in the bitter war with Congress over his long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump had demanded $5.7 billion for a 234-mile steel wall along part of the 1,954-mile border, but a compromise bill offered a fraction of that sum: $1.375 billion for a mere 55 miles of new fencing. With a Friday deadline looming on his earlier decision to lift the government shutdown, Trump’s threat of another shutdown receded Friday morning when he put pen to paper. “Am I happy at first glance? The answer is no, I’m not, I’m not happy,” he told White House reporters Tuesday, after meeting with his Cabinet. “It’s not going to do the trick, but I’m adding things to it, and when you add whatever I have to add, it’s all going to happen where we’re going to build a beautiful, big, strong wall.” Republican leaders were urging him throughout the week to sign it when it reaches his desk, saying that the GOP couldn’t afford to endure another government shutdown. “I think the president will sign it,” said Rep. Mark Meadows, Republican of North Carolina, the leader of the GOP’s conservative Freedom Caucus voting bloc. “I think he will do so reluctantly. And then, obviously, have to use executive actions to secure our borders.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., briefed Trump on the bill earlier this week, and later told reporters he urged the president to sign it. “He’s got a pretty good deal here.” Internally, the White House has been mapping out a plan to declare a national emergency at the border under his executive authority to use several billions of dollars more in previously appropriated defense funds. He laid out the arguments for that gambit in his State of the Union address, and in previous speeches, claiming that hordes of criminals, murderers, drug dealers, rapists, terrorists, among others, are swarming across the border by the thousands, posing a massive threat to America’s safety. But that plan, with little proof to support such action, is fraught with legal controversy that could be bottled up in the federal courts for months, if not longer. The Democrats have already warned that they would challenge Trump’s plan in the courts all the way to the Supreme Court. They have a powerful argument on their side: The United States Constitution, which unequivocally states that only Congress can appropriate government funds and decides how such funds are to be used. Presidents do not appropriate. They spend. Congress writes the bills that tell the chief executive how that money should be spent and by how much. And judging by how much has been added to our national debt in the last two years, Trump hasn’t been doing an abysmal job. The national debt, according to the U.S. Treasury, stood at $19.95 trillion when Trump took office on Jan. 20, 2017. Two years later, it is $22.01 trillion. Who is responsible? “The debt figure has been rising at a faster pace after passage of Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax cut in December 2017 and action by Congress last year to increase spending on domestic and military programs,” The Washington Post reported Wednesday. The Congressional Budget Office says this year’s budget deficit will come in at around $897 billion. The late Sen. Everett Dirksen once remarked about Washington’s spending appetites, “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking real money.” Donald Lambro has been covering Washington politics for more than 50 years as a reporter, editor and commentator.
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Although there seems to be a resurgence of smoking in the media of late, I still stand by the belief that cigarette smokers have long been relegated to the underclass of the social order. They are ostracized, even banished, from “polite society.” This was hammered home to me while at Salt Lake City airport. Upon taxing to the terminal, the attendant takes to the microphone to make her customary proclamations: “Thank you for flying with us; we realize you have a choice of airlines. (I do?) Please don’t remove your seat belt until the captain has pulled into the gate and, if you smoke, please do not do so until you arrive in the designated area inside the terminal.” Sure enough, literally smack-dab in the center of the terminal is an enclosed, glass-walled chamber where smokers light up and puff away to their heart’s content. (That’s probably a bad choice of expressions in light of the activity we’re discussing and its implications on heart disease.) What struck me most however was that through the grey misted air, they appeared as caged zoo animals, pacing in their restricted area, engaging in behaviors not accepted by the reminder of the population, while kept at a safe distance from those they could harm upon accidental release. I found the whole thing to be incredibly sad. Let me head off the armies of hacking militant, wheezing smokers who, even before they have finished reading this piece, are racing to computers to fire off angry missives about how I am insulting them. My comments are not as much levied at those who have chosen to engage in this habit as much as at the society that determines what is appropriate and what is not. Mores change and smoking, once considered “the cat’s meow,” is now considered gauche, existing in a strange societal limbo — scorned yet legal. I am allergic to tobacco smoke. Moreover, having previously lived with a smoker, the stench that permeated and saturated everything from clothing to carpeting invoked regularly my gag reflex. Her unwillingness (or inability) to stop engaging in this habit was one of the reasons our marriage ended; and sadly, one of the reasons she ended up passing away prior to her 60th birthday. So, I’m A-OK with the smoking being isolated. Yet, what is not tolerable to me is that it appears that we — the “Proper Members of Society” — are forever judging others in a misguided effort to feel better about ourselves, while ignoring our own annoying foibles. As I heard one motivational speaker say, “When you’re pointing at someone else, remember that four fingers are pointing back at you.” Civility’s spotlight, although not shifting from the nicotine user, also continues to include people who are overweight. As with users of cigarettes, behind their backs, we shake our heads and whisper to our “normal” friends, “It’s a shame that they don’t take care of themselves. I’d never let myself look like that.” We wag our fingers and click our tongues, satisfied that we are “better than that.” It’s probably human nature to try and elevate oneself by putting down others. I know in my lesser moments that I am not immune. However, it seems that each and every one of us has habits of which we would not want exposed to bright sunlight. Creating new sub-classes determined by what one eats or smokes is divisive, and we’ve got plenty of that going around. Good lord, if we wanted to build walls between that which divided us, we’d have countless choices. I’ve got bad habits. You do too. It’s not a reflection of self-worth; it is a method by which each of us is trying to make it through the day without collapsing under the weight of its stress. I’m not advocating abandoning personal responsibility and “let it all hang out;” quite the contrary. The process of growth is the cycle of “identify, adjust, and modify.” It seems if each of us spent a tad more energy striving to be an example instead of a judge, it could alter the atmosphere just enough that we wouldn’t need a cigarette — or bag of chips — quite as often. About the author: Scott “Q” Marcus is the CRP (Chief Recovering Perfectionist) of www.ThisTimeIMeanIt.com. He is available for coaching, speaking, and reminders of what really matters at 707.442.6243 or scottq@scottqmarcus.com.
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
It was one of the biggest disconnects in last year’s elections. In early 2018, three months before the June primary election, 54 percent of delegates to a convention of the California Democratic Party voted to desert longtime U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein and endorse the termed-out former president of the state Senate, Kevin de Leon of East Los Angeles. Voters demurred. In the primary, rank-and-file Democrats backed Feinstein by about a 70-30 percent margin. But the party organization ignored them. Its executive board voted to endorse de Leon anyway in their Democrat-on-Democrat November runoff election. Again, Feinstein won. This proved the state party organization comes nowhere near representing the wishes, philosophies or preferences of the party’s membership. The question for many analysts was, why the disconnect? For an explanation, fast forward to January, when Democrats staged caucuses in all 80 California state Assembly districts, choosing 14 delegates per district for the next party convention, set to begin May 30 in San Francisco. Trouble was, the party didn’t notify most Democrats of the vote. No postcards, no emails, no phone banks to let voters know the where, when and who. There was notice on the party website and via its internal listserv. But most who attended were informed by candidates or word of mouth. The vast bulk of candidates leaned strongly left, many sporting “Bernie” t-shirts and pledging universal health care, free college tuition and more, but never mentioning how to pay for anything. Those who turned up for caucuses could hear a few speeches, for no more than half an hour in most districts, then wait in line to vote. When they voted, no one verified where they lived or whether they had voted before and then gone to the end of the line and waited to vote again. The only hindrance to this was a hand stamp some (but not all) voters received, which could be washed off in moments. In this “honor system,” anyone could vote, citizen or not, district resident or not, Democrat or not, multiple times. The only check on this was one laptop computer per caucus, used to verify identification via a voter database – but only if someone challenged the legitimacy of a would-be voter. This, said state party spokesman Roger Salazar, made becoming a delegate “depend on the organizational skill of the candidate.” It also set apart California Democrats as “the most (lower-case) democratic political party in America,” he claimed. Certainly more democratic than this state’s Republicans, most of whose party convention delegates are chosen by elected officials, past candidates (winners and losers; mostly losers in California), and by the party’s county central committees. There was also the matter of who won these delegate elections. First, the party created two gender categories: “self-identified female” and “male/other than self-identified female.” Voters could mark seven in each category, but no matter who got the most votes, the top seven of each would become delegates. So if 14 self-identified other-than-females got more votes than the leading female, seven would be knocked out. This is democracy? “This is the type of election system the Democrats want not only for their party, but the entire state and nation,” chuckled Republican campaign manager and blogger Stephen Frank, a candidate for his party’s state chairmanship in the GOP’s state convention starting Feb. 22 in Sacramento. “Honesty and integrity is not the hallmark of that party,” Frank added. “They stuff ballot boxes even against themselves.” Responded Democrat Salazar, “At least we vote, and we’re working to make it better. The Republicans have no democracy at all and that’s the way they like it. Yes, we need to give more notice of our caucuses. But we can’t afford to send everyone a mailer or an email.” This excuse comes from the free-spending party that inundated virtually every California mailbox with election flyers last fall. The bottom line: Neither of California’s major parties is really democratic. While Democrats make a token effort, there’s little participation in their process, along with huge potential for corruption and cheating. Which goes far toward explaining why wise voters in actual elections pretty much disregard whatever the parties recommend. Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. For more Elias columns, visit www.californiafocus.net  
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Wednesday Meetings Caregiver Support Series: On Wednesday, Feb. 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at RCHDC Conference Room 8, 499 Leslie St., Ukiah. Free event. 1-800-834-1636 x100. Tax Preparation Service: Through April 12 at the Ukiah Senior Center. This is a first-come-first-served basis on Wednesdays and Fridays, from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.in Bartlett Hall, 495 Leslie St. Bring photo identification as well as yearly forms and documents showing income. 462-1535. Ukiah Library Kids’ Farmers Market: Every Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. at 105 N. Main St. Kids bring homegrown produce, eggs, honey and handmade crafts. Learn math and money handling skills while also learning to display and sell your products. Free event. 463-4490. Bereavement Support Group: On Wednesday, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1390 Laurel Ave., Ukiah. Free program. 456-3295. Craft Squad: On Wednesdays, from 2 to 5 p.m., at the Ukiah Library, 105 N. Main St. Free event. 467-6434. Gamblers Anonymous Group: Every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Calvary Baptist Church, 465 Luce Ave., Ukiah. 489-0963 Ukiah Library Baby Storytime: Every Wednesday, at 10:15 a.m., at 105 N. Main St. Babies ages 3-17 months and their grownups are welcome to join for a half-hour of reading, rhymes, finger play and songs while building early literacy skills. Older and younger siblings are always welcome. 463-4490.
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
by Barbara Howe, Mendocino County HHSA Public Health Director Mendocino County is a wonderful place to call home. We have beautiful natural landscapes where people can exercise and get mental peace and clarity. We live in a climate that allows us to grow fresh produce year-round and local ranchers who produce wholesome, organic dairy and meat. So why isn’t everyone healthy? Because to be healthy, it takes more than access to healthy food and places to exercise. Every few years, local health and wellness providers collaborate to identify our county’s biggest health challenges. We define health broadly and consider the social determinants of health as we work toward creating a community where all people can be as healthy as possible. The social determinants of health include the following broad categories: neighborhoods and the built environment, health and healthcare centers, social and community context, education, and economic stability. The ability to take advantage of things like healthy food and places to exercise depends in large part on people’s backgrounds. Did they grow up with enough money to buy food? Did they get adequate health care? Were they able to concentrate in school and learn the skills they need to support themselves, or were they too distracted by living situations that were physically or emotionally threatening? Together with Adventist Health Ukiah Valley, Mendocino County Public Health is one of the primary funders of the local needs assessment process and the work that comes out of it organized by Healthy Mendocino. In Mendocino County, we’ve identified five priority areas to improve population health. Poverty Poverty has a profound negative impact on health. Nearly 30 percent of the county’s children live below the federal poverty level, compared to 23 percent statewide. More than half of local children qualify for free lunches in public schools. Overall, 20 percent of county residents live in poverty, compared to 15 percent statewide. Elders, a growing segment of the county population, are also at risk. Several factors influence poverty, but one of them is that many local jobs don’t pay a “living wage.” That is, they don’t pay enough to cover basic expenses. Childhood obesity and family wellness Too many Mendocino County children struggle with obesity. Four of every ten children are overweight. Six out of ten children get less than one hour of physical exercise a day. Many families lack access to affordable, nutritious food, so they opt for a relatively cheap and accessible alternative—fast food. Sadly, childhood obesity is linked to adult obesity and many serious chronic illnesses. Childhood trauma Mendocino County’s rates of child abuse and domestic violence are among the highest in California, and as you can imagine, childhood trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a powerful negative impact on people’s health, safety, and wellbeing. They lead to negative health behaviors, poor performance at school and work, and higher risk for serious health conditions in adulthood. Housing More than a quarter of Mendocino County residents face severe housing problems, in part because we simply do not have enough housing, but there are other causes. In 2015 when we did a systematic count of homeless people in Mendocino County, we found more than 1,000 individuals living in vehicles, outdoors or in shelters—some of them children. According to our survey, the two top barriers to meeting basic health needs are food and housing. Mental Health In addition to poverty, mental health is strongly linked to homelessness: 41 percent of local homeless people report having a serious mental illness. Not only does the stigma around mental health often prevent people from seeking treatment, even when they are willing to reach out for help, our county lacks adequate services, especially wrap-around and full-service models. While all of these challenges are daunting, by working together I’m confident we can improve the health of people in our county. I applaud and appreciate Adventist Health Ukiah Valley’s commitment to health in our region, and I’m excited to work with the new hospital president, Jason Wells, whose energy and positive approach give me confidence and hope. To learn more about Mendocino County’s health indicators, visit healthymendocino.org. If you or your organization would like to get involved in making our county a healthier place to live, contact Healthy Mendocino Program Manager Patrice Mascolo at pmascolo@ncoinc.org.
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
The first of five Friday evenings of live music and notable films from the International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula, Montana will begin Friday, Feb. 22, at the Ukiah Civic Center, 300 Seminary Avenue.  Festivities will start at 6:15 p.m. with Bob Laughton’s lively Celtic folk music. Opening night screenings will begin at 7 p.m. featuring films portraying the importance of three iconic keystone species and citizen efforts to support them. “The Beaver Believers” (50 min.) – This whimsical yet inspiring film captures the vision, energy, and dedication of a half dozen activists who share a passion for restoring the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) to much of its former habitat and range. Viewers will learn how this humble creature can help us restore streams and watersheds damaged by neglect. “Canis Lupus Colorado” (18 min.) – Ghosts are stirring in Colorado’s high country. They haunt the trees, the water, the animals – the very fabric of the land itself. Gray wolves shaped this place for eons only to disappear nearly overnight. “Canis Lupus Colorado” is the story of the past, present, and future of Colorado’s now extinct native wolf population. “Drive Them Buffalo” (18 min.) – Provides an intimate look at the only indigenous tribal-led buffalo drive in North America. This exciting film follows members of the Blackfeet Nation as they experience the power of the American bison while driving their herd through rough terrain and hostile weather to their winter pasture – a rare ritual of stewardship that brings hope for a cultural rebirth. Tickets for the Wildlife Film Festival are available at Mendocino Book Co. or at the door. Series tickets are $45 and individual tickets are a suggested donation of $10 for adults and $5 for children. Films are appropriate for older children, but parental discretion is recommended. Proceeds from the film festival are an important funding source for the Redwood Valley Outdoor Education Project (RVOEP), a special program of the Ukiah Unified School District that provides outdoor environmental education programs to over 2,000 students a year. For a full program of the film series and more information about the RVOEP visit its website, www.rvoep.org. For further inquiries, contact Maureen Taylor, RVOEP Education Coordinator, at 489-0227.
19 Feb 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Isis has become my valentine, and I hers, over the last 10 years.–The fact somewhat slowly and deliciously occurred to us . . . occurred to me first because my part in our duet is a November song. Her part, springing from her whole-hearted kindness, gives our partnership its (mostly) cheerful tone. In my reflective moments, when I’m alone and deep in first-person singular columny, I imagine her as singing a descant to my impressions of life in these latter days . . . “descant,” as in one of Wikipedia’s etymologies: “from the term discantus supra librum (descant above the book) . . . a form of Gregorian chant in which only the melody is notated but an improvised polyphony is understood.”–Mine the notated, darkling melody, hers the whole and bright-hearted polyphony, above my book. Example (You can assign the parts): “It was in the last goddam place I looked!”–”Of course it was in the last place you looked.”–Ours is an equal relationship, and we can reverse roles: “You’re courting me, aren’t you?”–”You’ve noticed!” I said. ‘Twas a Happy Valentine’s Day with dearest Isis last week! ____________________________________________________ Yet our world was much with us—as Wordsworth’s was too much with him—late and soon: late (MSNBC reruns its news at the midnight hour), soon (one can wake to news from The 51% at 5 a.m. on KZYX) and our world’s with us all day, for when we want to confirm our confirmation biases with web sources. My idea here is that our much-with-us world is sentimentalized in proportion to its distance from Black Bart Trail, North State Street, MacNab’s clothing store, Chop Chop, the courthouse . . . those ordinary places where we go about our daily business.–Sentimentality (defined as emotion in excess of stimulus) is a distorting lens. But sentimentality has its uses. Example: there are some Parkland youngsters & their families for whom there’ll be no more Valentine’s days.–A realist of sarcastic warp might respond to such sentimental phrasing & pitch, “Yes, and why not tear-jerk for the other 7435 Americans, most far from Mendoland, who died that day? Save your tears for those you know.” (Our sarcastic realist has read the United Nations World Population Prospects report. I’ve subtracted 17 from the UN’s number.) Realistic answer to sarcastic question: the 7435 died (mostly) of natural causes. May the majority of those causes be old age! The human lot. If you haven’t already done so, get used to it, and work to cure and prevent accident and disease. Get vaccinated! The personal really is social, societal and medical! If you’re young, become a medical researcher! If you have shelter and enough to eat and energy left over, use some of it to work to extend humane sympathy beyond its human evolutionary family and tribal bounds and bonds! Don’t be afraid to soap-box a bit, I tell myself, noting that exclamation points do tend toward the sentimental. Think of Charles Dickens and Hard Times and A Christmas Carol. Cloying as it can become, positive sentimentality can be a first step toward positive action: imagine Mendo Coast children without food in summer, when school is out. Imagine them, then send money to P.O. Box 1616 Mendocino, CA 95460. I accentuate positive sentimentality because our President has destructively & effectively deployed negative sentimentality with his weaponized horror film imagery: families murdered by illegal immigrants, young girls trafficked by illegal immigrants, M13 gangs of illegal immigrants flooding across the border until he himself builds a great big beautiful wall, said wall to be manned by border agents, every one of them a hero like himself: “You don’t know until you’re tested, but I really believe I would have run in there without a weapon,” he modestly bragged about himself after the Parkland shooting. (Video, of the bragging, on the web.) Whose image do you see, as you start Book 2 of Milton’s Paradise Lost? HIgh on a Throne of Royal State, which far/ Outshon the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,/   Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand/ Showrs on her Kings Barbaric Pearl and Gold,/ Satan exalted sat, by merit rais’d/ To that bad eminence . . . JM lives on a ridge-between in  Mendocino County, where he sometimes ponders Martin Luther’s supposed question, ‘Why should the Devil get all the good tunes’ . . . and media coverage.–itsallgood1776@gmail.com
19 Feb 19
TalesofLineDrive

Hello and welcome to a February edition of Rounding Third. The heat has been well and truly on here in the north east of the state over the past four weeks. However with the heat, the busy committee at Rangers HQ have been working away feverishly behind the scenes to help improve the profile of […]

19 Feb 19
News365.co.za

It is not so long ago when the rumour that former Generations actress Thulisile Phongolo had engaged to a business mogul broke the internet. Phongolo was reported to be in a relationship with former Muvhango actor Raphael Griffiths and later dumped him for a better, wealthier man. According to Sunday Sun, Thuli was spoiled rotten […]

19 Feb 19
Celeb Gossip News

It is not so long ago when the rumour that former Generations actress Thulisile Phongolo had engaged to a business mogul broke the internet. Phongolo was reported to be in a relationship with former Muvhango actor Raphael Griffiths and later dumped him for a better, wealthier man. According to Sunday Sun, Thuli was spoiled rotten […]

19 Feb 19
Where are we Landing?

There has been a lot of debating going on regarding the competition between Fortnite and one of its contenders, PLAYERUNKNOWN’S BATTLEGROUNDS or as gamers like to call it, (PUBG). Now, according to Matt Brian on Engadget, there was a time when PUBG won “Best Multiplayer Game” at the 2017 game awards in December for breaking […]

19 Feb 19
Got A Million Rhymes

When I think of music, many memories come to mind. However,  the most salient memories are earlier in my life. When I was really young the music I listened to relied pretty heavily on what my mom was listening to, as it was a lot of what I knew and so I came to love […]