University Of Washington

20 Mar 19
World Daily News

Press Releases: Strategic Dialogue Opening Remarks and Signing Remarks Michael R. Pompeo Secretary of State Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah Al-Khalid Al-Sabah  Ministry of Foreign Affairs Kuwait City, Kuwait March 20, 2019 FOREIGN MINISTER AL-KHALED: (Via interpreter) Ladies and gentlemen, (inaudible) members of the Kuwaiti delegation to welcome you, to welcome the U.S. delegation to […]

20 Mar 19
Google News

Two former USC football recruiters point out how administrator could have manipulated admissions  Los Angeles Times ‘Do You Pull the Parchment?’: Students Caught Up in College Admissions Scandal Now Face a Reckoning  The New York Times College admissions scandal shows how desperate the privileged are to keep it that way  Los Angeles Times College admissions are corrupt because […]

20 Mar 19
MinnPost
The 38th Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival is just over two weeks away. Tickets go on sale to the general public tomorrow (Thursday, March 21) at 11 a.m. The complete lineup is already online, including dates, times, venues, descriptions and trailers. We stopped by the Film Society’s offices Tuesday for some tips and insights from executive director Susan Smoluchowski, programing director Jesse Bishop and publicity manager Kelly Nathe. First, the basics: MSPIFF starts Thursday, April 4, and ends Saturday, April 20. The 260 films – including 160 features – hail from 77 countries around the world. The 2019 festival won’t spotlight a particular country, but “we have a large number of films from Mexico, and we’re delighted to be able to say that,” Smoluchowski said. The festival will take place in five venues: the St. Anthony Main Theatre (all five screens), the Capri Theater, Film Space at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, the Marcus Rochester Cinema in Rochester and, new this year, the renovated Parkway Theatre in Minneapolis. “The Parkway is a film venue but also a music performance space,” Bishop said. “We’re showing a good roster of music-related films there.” What to see? Smoluchowski recommends the opening night film, for one. Based on the memoir by Cuban ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, “Yuli” is the story of Acosta’s rise from the streets of Havana to London’s Royal Ballet. The after-party at Jefe will include food, drink, and dancing to music by Salsa Del Sol. Smoluchowski loves “Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins.” It’s “Molly Ivins in all of her brilliant, funny glory,” she said. Ivins got her start at the Minneapolis Tribune as its first female police reporter. Along with Ivins, the festival includes “quite a few profiles of public figures and luminaries,” Bishop said. He pointed to “Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am,” “What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael,” “Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin,” “Mike Wallace Is Here” and “Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool.” Smoluchowski recommends that if a film you want to see is sold out, go to the one next door, even if you don’t have a clue about it. She did that at Telluride and ended up seeing “Hugh Hefner’s After Dark: Speaking Out in America.” It’s a documentary about two short-lived syndicated TV series Playboy founder Hefner hosted in 1959-60 and 1969-70. “I went in thinking – why do I want to know about Hugh Hefner? I came out astonished. He brought all of these activists and musicians into his living room, including black musicians who couldn’t appear on broadcast television at the time. It was mind-blowing.” Everybody’s excited about “Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché.” Who? “Born in France in the late 1800s, she made the first-ever fiction film – before the Lumiére brothers or anyone else,” Smoluchowski said.  “She was involved in making more than 1,000 films and directed 500. Her films are extraordinary. Radical. She talks about gender, relationships and race. But she was forgotten.” The documentary is narrated by Jodi Foster. “It’s really great,” Bishop said. “It’s like a rewriting of cinema history.” The MSPIFF Centerpiece Party will follow the screening. Held at the A-Mill Artist Lofts, it will celebrate all the women filmmakers and special guests attending this year’s festival, including Washington Post chief film critic Ann Hornaday. The next day, MSPIFF will show a selection of Guy-Blaché’s films. In 2015, MSPIFF launched a Women & Film Initiative to focus on the work of women filmmakers. This year’s festival will include more than 102 films (features and shorts) directed by women, the most in MSPIFF’s history. What were some of the challenges involved in finding and identifying so many films by women directors? “I don’t think it’s been the kind of challenge people would expect it to be,” Smoluchowski said. “There are women making films all over the world – extraordinary films. Especially in this country, we have the sense that women don’t make films. That’s simply not true. We haven’t had to dig at all. We’ve just found that some of the best films we’ve seen are made by women.” [cms_ad:x100] The picks Tonight at the Cowles: Leonard Bernstein’s “Candide.” When tickets to all five concerts sold out, VocalEssence added a general admission preview performance to this new take on Bernstein’s work, long hailed for the beauty of its music but never successful on stage. Director Peter Rothstein (Theater Latté Da) has re-imagined it as a radio play, the VocalEssence Choir sings, Philip Brunelle leads the choir and a chamber orchestra, and the cast is fantastic: Phinehas Bynum, Michael Fairbairn, Bradley Greenwald, Liz Hawkinson, Susan Hofflander, Rodolfo Nieto, Liv Redpath and G. Phillip Shoultz III. 7:30 p.m. FMI and tickets ($35); 612-371-5656. Orchestra Hall is selling the tickets, but the event is at the Cowles. [image_credit]Courtesy of Vieux Carré[/image_credit][image_caption]The Avishai Cohen Quartet will perform at Vieux Carré tonight.[/image_caption]Tonight at Vieux Carré: Avishai Cohen Quartet. The esteemed German label ECM is celebrating its 50th birthday and touring several of its artists this spring. Sun of Goldfinger played Icehouse on Monday, and tonight the Avishai Cohen Quartet will perform at the basement jazz club in St. Paul (down the hall from the Park Square’s Andy Boss Stage). Israeli-born trumpeter Cohen, brother to clarinetist Anat and soprano saxophonist Yuval, has made three albums to date with ECM; his latest, “Cross My Palm with Silver,” is spacious, reflective and ravishing. The quartet features Fabian Almazan on piano, Barak Mori on bass and Marcus Gilmore on drums. 7:30 p.m. FMI. $25/20 at the door. Thursday at the Walker: Next Generation of Parks: Robert Hammond. Created on a former New York Central Railroad spur on the west side of Manhattan, the High Line has transformed its neighborhood – and not for everyone’s benefit. The cofounder and executive director of Friends of the High Line, Hammond will reflect on the park’s legacy, its impact, and the need for more equitable community development. This should be interesting. Presented by the Minneapolis Parks Foundation. 7 p.m. Free. This is a Target Free Thursday, so admission to the Walker is also free. [image_credit]Courtesy of the Walker Art Center[/image_credit][image_caption]“The Living Word” will feature a world premiere from Angélica Negron.[/image_caption]Friday and Saturday at the Summit Center for Arts and Innovation: ModernMedieval: “The Living Word.” Created by Jacqueline Horner-Kwiatek, a former member of Anonymous 4, with singers from Roomful of Teeth, ModernMedieval combines medieval chant and polyphony with new commissions and contemporary sounds. Co-commissioned and presented by the SPCO’s Liquid Music and the Walker Art Center, this concert will feature ecstatic chants of Hildegard of Bingen, new music by Julianna Barwick, and world premieres by Ben Frost and Angélica Negron. Old meets brand new. 8 p.m. FMI and tickets ($25/20). Friday through Sunday at HUGE Improv Theater: 4th Annual Black & Funny Improv Fest. This is the fourth year of a festival that aims to raise awareness in the Twin Cities black community that improv is something they can do and benefit from. Daily workshops and panel discussions are followed by nightly performances. The festival features local groups (Blackout Improv) and groups from New York, Atlanta and Chicago. FMI and tickets ($15; passes available)
20 Mar 19
American Legion Auxiliary Blog

Since 1937, thousands of young women from across the nation have convened every year for the American Legion Auxiliary Girls State program. For one week, these future leaders are guided through a government-in-action program while learning the values of leadership, teamwork, and civics. Auxiliary magazine recently issued a call for past ALA Girls Staters to let […]

20 Mar 19
Recovering Man

Researchers in the US have shown they can block pain receptors and restore motivation – such findings could stem opioid addiction

20 Mar 19
Viral Topic Zone

Beirut, Lebanon – In January, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo went on a diplomatic mission to scuttle Syria’s readmission to the Arab League. On Thursday, he is expected in Lebanon, where he is set to target another one of Iran’s allies, Hezbollah. Pompeo is scheduled to hold talks with Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri and is expected […]

20 Mar 19
Sydneys blogs

There is a better alternative: life without parole.In Oregon, they have the option of sentencing convicted murderers to life in prison without the possibility of parole. There are currently over 121 people in Oregon who have received this sentence. I feel like we should do this everywhere, not just in Oregon. The death penalty puts […]

20 Mar 19
The Mercury News
By Moriah Balingit, Susan Svrluga and Nick Anderson | The Washington Post LOS ANGELES – To Kwaku Rogers, son of Ghanaian immigrants, the University of Southern California offers a ticket to get ahead in life. The 19-year-old sophomore prizes the network of Trojan alumni and the abundant academic and social opportunities available to students like him, who are among the first in their families to go to college. “I like to say USC is like a rocket,” said Rogers, of Norcross, Georgia. “It’s upward social mobility.” But that vision – shared by many here who see a private university with a striking commitment to access for the disadvantaged – has been eclipsed in the past week by another narrative that thrust USC into the center of a stunning college admissions scandal. Far too often, students and faculty lament, access is still all about money. That is their conclusion from a federal investigation that uncovered an alleged scheme to get children of celebrities and other wealthy parents into prominent universities via cheating and bribery. Prosecutors say checks from 33 parents funded fakery on SAT and ACT admissions tests and sophisticated ruses to designate applicants with minimal or no intercollegiate sports potential as recruited athletes. That label would boost their chances of admission. [dfm_iframe src=”https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/c/embed/e0aa258d-700c-4d9a-b9fd-3c584a2c66f0″ width=”100%” advanced_fields=”true” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The most frequent target in the alleged admissions fraud scam: USC, the current or former employer of six of the 50 alleged perpetrators, including a renowned water polo coach, a senior athletic official and even a professor seeking to help his college-bound daughter. The admissions investigation hit USC at a vulnerable moment. Last summer its president, C.L. “Max” Nikias, was forced out amid uproar over the handling of controversies, including allegations of abuse by a USC gynecologist and the resignations of two medical school deans amid questions about alleged misconduct. School trustees are nearing the end of a search to replace Nikias. The chair of USC’s board, Rick Caruso, said in an interview Tuesday that the school will do whatever it takes to find out what happened in the scandal and prevent a repeat. “It’s unthinkable what these parents did,” Caruso said, and unthinkable what the administrator and coaches were alleged to have done. Frederick J. Ryan Jr., publisher and chief executive of The Washington Post, is also a member of the board. He declined to comment. USC interim president Wanda M. Austin pledged aggressive action to uphold the integrity of admissions since prosecutors announced charges March 12 in Boston. USC has denied admission to the upcoming freshman class for applicants with ties to the alleged scam, launched a review of current students and graduates who may be linked, fired two employees and placed another on leave as a step toward termination. Austin said USC also would consider revoking degrees of those who fraudulently secured admission. “Rebuilding trust is something you do over a period of time,” Austin told The Post in a telephone interview. “Some of the sanctions we’ve already taken should signal that we’re taking this very seriously.” Over the past several years, federal investigators alleged, the scam facilitated admission to USC for more than two dozen students as recruited athletes, even though many had fabricated credentials in water polo, soccer and track and field. Austin acknowledged the breadth of USC’s exposure to the scandal poses many questions. Chief among them: Why weren’t alarms raised internally years ago about the phenomenon of purported student-athletes who fail to join or play for the teams that recruited them? “One of the things we want to understand is how the process was falsified and what steps individuals were taking to cover up their actions,” Austin said. Given what is now known, she said, it is a challenge “to look back at the facts and say, ‘Why didn’t you recognize something as a yellow flashing light?’ “ Many on the faculty are upset. “We have made far too many errors in judgment over the last two years – and this is par for the course,” said William G. Tierney, a professor and scholar of higher education. USC is not the only school facing questions. Others with current and former athletic coaches charged in the scam include Georgetown, Yale, Stanford and Wake Forest universities, as well as the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California at Los Angeles. On Monday, the University of California at Berkeley confirmed that it has opened an investigation into a former student whose father, Canadian businessman David Sidoo, is accused of participating in the scam. Prosecutors say Sidoo paid $100,000 for his son to obtain fake SAT scores that he submitted in 2014 for admission to Berkeley. Sidoo has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud. Other accused parents are scheduled to appear in federal court next week in Boston. A lawyer familiar with the case, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss potential strategies, said that parents could argue they were duped by an unscrupulous admissions consultant: William “Rick” Singer, the alleged mastermind of the scam. Singer, of Newport Beach, California, has pleaded guilty to racketeering and other charges and is cooperating with investigators. “Rick Singer’s a sales guy and a con guy,” the lawyer said, suggesting that parents were unaware their money would be put to illegal use. “They didn’t know what the scheme was. They knew that they were giving money to help their kid get into the school.” Over and over, the investigation found, the school that many of the accused parents sought for their children was USC. Court documents allege that one father conspired with Singer to create a fake profile of his son as a football player. “I’m gonna make him a kicker/punter and they’re gonna walk him through with football, and I’ll get a picture and figure out how to Photoshop and stuff,” Singer told the father, according to court documents. Several alleged transactions involved Donna Heinel, who was senior associate athletic director at USC. She has been charged with racketeering conspiracy and is scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston next week. USC fired her last week. Telephone and email messages to Heinel were not returned. From 2014 to 2018, prosecutors say, Singer’s clients paid more than $1.3 million to USC accounts controlled by Heinel. In addition, Heinel allegedly received sham consulting payments from Singer of $20,000 a month starting in July 2018. In exchange for the bribes, prosecutors say, Heinel agreed to help purported athletes get in. In 2016, for instance, prosecutors quote Singer as saying that Heinel wanted to help an applicant pose as a coxswain for the crew team. That applicant was granted conditional admission in October 2016, and the father allegedly sent Heinel a check that month for $50,000, payable to USC athletics. The case is a setback in USC’s years-long effort to shake the stereotype that it is a playground for the rich. Just west of the Harbor Freeway, the campus is dotted with palm trees and tranquil vistas of promenades and quads. On Monday, students returned from spring break with the sun shining and temperatures in the high 70s. The formidable women’s beach volleyball team held practice on a sand court, and several students in suits zipped around on motorized skateboards. There is, to be sure, plenty of privilege. Campus restaurants serve acai bowls, poke and salmon salads. A nearby shopping center includes a store that peddles fancy gummy bears and skin-care products. The bookstore has a “cupcake ATM” that dispenses gourmet cupcakes instead of cash. Federal data shows that about 40 percent of the university’s 19,000 undergraduates pay full price. That exceeds $70,000 a year for tuition, fees, room and board. But 21 percent have enough financial need to qualify for federal Pell Grants – a higher share than what is found at many prominent private research universities. USC also has built an unusually wide pipeline of transfer students from community colleges. One is Miriam Antonio, 22, a junior who grew up in this city’s Koreatown. Her mother is a night-shift janitor, and Antonio is first in her family to go to college. She said the scandal was a reminder of gaps here between haves and have-nots. “It is true that wealth can buy your way into a lot of places and that there is an unequal playing field,” Antonio said. “Also, it made me more upset to know that students whose parents participated in this took a spot from a student that actually deserved it.” USC has climbed steadily in prestige over the past two decades. In 1996, it ranked 44th on the U.S. News & World Report list of top national universities. By 2011, it had cracked the top 25. This year it ranks 22nd, tied with Georgetown and UC-Berkeley, and just ahead of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Virginia. USC is also a fundraising engine, enabling it to recruit star faculty. “It was a school for rich kids and over the past few years it turned into a powerhouse,” said Jacob Soll, a USC professor of philosophy, history and accounting. “It’s hard to imagine the positive impact this has had on L.A., California and the country.” Federal data shows that applications to USC for freshman admission have doubled since 2001, to more than 56,000 in 2017. During that time, it became much harder to win a coveted seat at the school: Just 16 percent of applicants were accepted in 2017, compared with 34 percent in 2001. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]With competition intensifying, admission consultants say pressure has risen in certain social circles to find paths into what is seen as a top-notch university with a full menu of fraternities and sororities and high-level NCAA athletics. “You have to able to go to the cocktail party with the right Birkin bag and to be able to say . . . ‘My kid goes to USC,’ ” said Arun Ponnusamy, chief academic officer for the counseling company Collegewise. That kind of thinking is a backdrop to the scandal. Rogers, the sophomore from Georgia, who is president of the First-Generation College Student Union, called the scandal disappointing but saw a potential upside. “Even though it’s bad press, I feel like there’s a benefit to it, too,” Rogers said. “I feel like more people are going to apply knowing that someone paid $500,000 to get their son or daughter into the school.” — Svrluga and Anderson reported from Washington. The Post’s Alice Crites and Jennifer Jenkins contributed to this report.  
20 Mar 19
East Bay Times
By Moriah Balingit, Susan Svrluga and Nick Anderson | The Washington Post LOS ANGELES – To Kwaku Rogers, son of Ghanaian immigrants, the University of Southern California offers a ticket to get ahead in life. The 19-year-old sophomore prizes the network of Trojan alumni and the abundant academic and social opportunities available to students like him, who are among the first in their families to go to college. “I like to say USC is like a rocket,” said Rogers, of Norcross, Georgia. “It’s upward social mobility.” But that vision – shared by many here who see a private university with a striking commitment to access for the disadvantaged – has been eclipsed in the past week by another narrative that thrust USC into the center of a stunning college admissions scandal. Far too often, students and faculty lament, access is still all about money. That is their conclusion from a federal investigation that uncovered an alleged scheme to get children of celebrities and other wealthy parents into prominent universities via cheating and bribery. Prosecutors say checks from 33 parents funded fakery on SAT and ACT admissions tests and sophisticated ruses to designate applicants with minimal or no intercollegiate sports potential as recruited athletes. That label would boost their chances of admission. [dfm_iframe src=”https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/c/embed/e0aa258d-700c-4d9a-b9fd-3c584a2c66f0″ width=”100%” advanced_fields=”true” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The most frequent target in the alleged admissions fraud scam: USC, the current or former employer of six of the 50 alleged perpetrators, including a renowned water polo coach, a senior athletic official and even a professor seeking to help his college-bound daughter. The admissions investigation hit USC at a vulnerable moment. Last summer its president, C.L. “Max” Nikias, was forced out amid uproar over the handling of controversies, including allegations of abuse by a USC gynecologist and the resignations of two medical school deans amid questions about alleged misconduct. School trustees are nearing the end of a search to replace Nikias. The chair of USC’s board, Rick Caruso, said in an interview Tuesday that the school will do whatever it takes to find out what happened in the scandal and prevent a repeat. “It’s unthinkable what these parents did,” Caruso said, and unthinkable what the administrator and coaches were alleged to have done. Frederick J. Ryan Jr., publisher and chief executive of The Washington Post, is also a member of the board. He declined to comment. USC interim president Wanda M. Austin pledged aggressive action to uphold the integrity of admissions since prosecutors announced charges March 12 in Boston. USC has denied admission to the upcoming freshman class for applicants with ties to the alleged scam, launched a review of current students and graduates who may be linked, fired two employees and placed another on leave as a step toward termination. Austin said USC also would consider revoking degrees of those who fraudulently secured admission. “Rebuilding trust is something you do over a period of time,” Austin told The Post in a telephone interview. “Some of the sanctions we’ve already taken should signal that we’re taking this very seriously.” Over the past several years, federal investigators alleged, the scam facilitated admission to USC for more than two dozen students as recruited athletes, even though many had fabricated credentials in water polo, soccer and track and field. Austin acknowledged the breadth of USC’s exposure to the scandal poses many questions. Chief among them: Why weren’t alarms raised internally years ago about the phenomenon of purported student-athletes who fail to join or play for the teams that recruited them? “One of the things we want to understand is how the process was falsified and what steps individuals were taking to cover up their actions,” Austin said. Given what is now known, she said, it is a challenge “to look back at the facts and say, ‘Why didn’t you recognize something as a yellow flashing light?’ “ Many on the faculty are upset. “We have made far too many errors in judgment over the last two years – and this is par for the course,” said William G. Tierney, a professor and scholar of higher education. USC is not the only school facing questions. Others with current and former athletic coaches charged in the scam include Georgetown, Yale, Stanford and Wake Forest universities, as well as the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California at Los Angeles. On Monday, the University of California at Berkeley confirmed that it has opened an investigation into a former student whose father, Canadian businessman David Sidoo, is accused of participating in the scam. Prosecutors say Sidoo paid $100,000 for his son to obtain fake SAT scores that he submitted in 2014 for admission to Berkeley. Sidoo has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud. Other accused parents are scheduled to appear in federal court next week in Boston. A lawyer familiar with the case, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss potential strategies, said that parents could argue they were duped by an unscrupulous admissions consultant: William “Rick” Singer, the alleged mastermind of the scam. Singer, of Newport Beach, California, has pleaded guilty to racketeering and other charges and is cooperating with investigators. “Rick Singer’s a sales guy and a con guy,” the lawyer said, suggesting that parents were unaware their money would be put to illegal use. “They didn’t know what the scheme was. They knew that they were giving money to help their kid get into the school.” Over and over, the investigation found, the school that many of the accused parents sought for their children was USC. Court documents allege that one father conspired with Singer to create a fake profile of his son as a football player. “I’m gonna make him a kicker/punter and they’re gonna walk him through with football, and I’ll get a picture and figure out how to Photoshop and stuff,” Singer told the father, according to court documents. Several alleged transactions involved Donna Heinel, who was senior associate athletic director at USC. She has been charged with racketeering conspiracy and is scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston next week. USC fired her last week. Telephone and email messages to Heinel were not returned. From 2014 to 2018, prosecutors say, Singer’s clients paid more than $1.3 million to USC accounts controlled by Heinel. In addition, Heinel allegedly received sham consulting payments from Singer of $20,000 a month starting in July 2018. In exchange for the bribes, prosecutors say, Heinel agreed to help purported athletes get in. In 2016, for instance, prosecutors quote Singer as saying that Heinel wanted to help an applicant pose as a coxswain for the crew team. That applicant was granted conditional admission in October 2016, and the father allegedly sent Heinel a check that month for $50,000, payable to USC athletics. The case is a setback in USC’s years-long effort to shake the stereotype that it is a playground for the rich. Just west of the Harbor Freeway, the campus is dotted with palm trees and tranquil vistas of promenades and quads. On Monday, students returned from spring break with the sun shining and temperatures in the high 70s. The formidable women’s beach volleyball team held practice on a sand court, and several students in suits zipped around on motorized skateboards. There is, to be sure, plenty of privilege. Campus restaurants serve acai bowls, poke and salmon salads. A nearby shopping center includes a store that peddles fancy gummy bears and skin-care products. The bookstore has a “cupcake ATM” that dispenses gourmet cupcakes instead of cash. Federal data shows that about 40 percent of the university’s 19,000 undergraduates pay full price. That exceeds $70,000 a year for tuition, fees, room and board. But 21 percent have enough financial need to qualify for federal Pell Grants – a higher share than what is found at many prominent private research universities. USC also has built an unusually wide pipeline of transfer students from community colleges. One is Miriam Antonio, 22, a junior who grew up in this city’s Koreatown. Her mother is a night-shift janitor, and Antonio is first in her family to go to college. She said the scandal was a reminder of gaps here between haves and have-nots. “It is true that wealth can buy your way into a lot of places and that there is an unequal playing field,” Antonio said. “Also, it made me more upset to know that students whose parents participated in this took a spot from a student that actually deserved it.” USC has climbed steadily in prestige over the past two decades. In 1996, it ranked 44th on the U.S. News & World Report list of top national universities. By 2011, it had cracked the top 25. This year it ranks 22nd, tied with Georgetown and UC-Berkeley, and just ahead of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Virginia. USC is also a fundraising engine, enabling it to recruit star faculty. “It was a school for rich kids and over the past few years it turned into a powerhouse,” said Jacob Soll, a USC professor of philosophy, history and accounting. “It’s hard to imagine the positive impact this has had on L.A., California and the country.” Federal data shows that applications to USC for freshman admission have doubled since 2001, to more than 56,000 in 2017. During that time, it became much harder to win a coveted seat at the school: Just 16 percent of applicants were accepted in 2017, compared with 34 percent in 2001. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]With competition intensifying, admission consultants say pressure has risen in certain social circles to find paths into what is seen as a top-notch university with a full menu of fraternities and sororities and high-level NCAA athletics. “You have to able to go to the cocktail party with the right Birkin bag and to be able to say . . . ‘My kid goes to USC,’ ” said Arun Ponnusamy, chief academic officer for the counseling company Collegewise. That kind of thinking is a backdrop to the scandal. Rogers, the sophomore from Georgia, who is president of the First-Generation College Student Union, called the scandal disappointing but saw a potential upside. “Even though it’s bad press, I feel like there’s a benefit to it, too,” Rogers said. “I feel like more people are going to apply knowing that someone paid $500,000 to get their son or daughter into the school.” — Svrluga and Anderson reported from Washington. The Post’s Alice Crites and Jennifer Jenkins contributed to this report.  
20 Mar 19
VREPS

Shelby Silvernell – add tags Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position and how you got into the field of visual resources?My background is in studio arts and photography, and I graduated with a BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art. Internships in college were my first exposure to […]

20 Mar 19
Russia News Now

Western regime change efforts have intensified ahead of upcoming elections in Thailand. Opposition groups attempting to take power and remove Thailand’s powerful, independent military from Thai politics have received extensive, well-documented funding and political support from Washington, London, Brussels, and Western corporate foundations, including the most notorious of all – George Soros’ Open Society Foundation […]

20 Mar 19
EL MARTILLO DE SUAREZ

  LAS RATAS Y LAS ESCUELAS CHARTER Publicado en Ingles el 3 de septiembre de 2018 en El Martillo de Suárez Por Efraín Suárez-Arce, HQT http://www.facebook.com/groups/elmartillodesuarez Érase una vez, Puerto Rico tenía un problema serio con las ratas negras. Las ratas negras llegaron por primera vez a Puerto Rico a fines del siglo XV con los […]