Valentine's Day

25 May 19
Cooking Nations

Learn how to make a Grand Marnier Souffle Recipe! Go to http://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2013/02/grand-marnier-souffles-rising-to.html for the ingredient amounts, more information, and over 800 more video recipes! I hope you enjoy this easy Grand Marnier Souffle recipe!

25 May 19
TONY BRADSHAW

Alright, let’s just admit it. The word budgeting makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up. You break out in dry sweat. Your skin gets clammy. Your stress level goes up, and you may have a number of other symptoms. It doesn’t have to be that way.

25 May 19
Hannah Cole

An Acquaintance with Darkness by Ann Rinaldi, published in 1997, is a work of young adult fiction that focuses concurrently on two very different themes: the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the history of medical ethics. Surprisingly, the latter theme is at the forefront of this novel, while the murder of Lincoln works to bring […]

25 May 19
Full Circle Cinema

Director Jeff Fowler announced via Twitter that his movie, Sonic the Hedgehog will be delayed by three months. The movie will move from November 8th of this year to Valentine’s Day in 2020. You can check out Fowler’s tweet below: Taking a little more time to make Sonic just right.#novfxartistswereharmedinthemakingofthismovie pic.twitter.com/gxhu9lhU76 — Jeff Fowler (@fowltown) […]

24 May 19
The Love of Mccarthy 401

Trekking with good pumps come as a result of ideal total amount. Very hold that adjustable rate mortgages migrating, however it’s not that much! Consider swinging the item the common way where you can generate a quantity step. Help make your lower limbs upright have to pay end. And next simply proceed strutting you need […]

24 May 19
werewolves on the moon

By Joan Lindsay It’s Valentine’s Day 1900, and in Australia the girls of Appleyard College, a private boarding school, undertake a picnic to Hanging Rock, a distinctive geological formation created by volcanic activity millions of years ago. During the afternoon four students wander off to climb the rocks. Eventually one of the girls returns, distraught […]

24 May 19
Press Telegram
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Daily Breeze
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Orange County Register
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Daily News
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Whittier Daily News
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Pasadena Star News
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Press Enterprise
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Redlands Daily Facts
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”
24 May 19
Daily Bulletin
COSTA MESA — He has heard it from umpires, coaches, spectators and reporters, from anybody who remembers anything about the ’60s and ’70s. He is Joey Fregosi and he plays baseball. You really have to ask if he’s kin? “I’ve seen pictures of me in a diaper, swinging a bat,” he said Thursday. “I’ve been around it all my life. They always ask, ‘Is that your grandpa?’ There can be a little pressure in that.” Joey is a middle infielder for Orange Coast College. There’s a little pressure in that, too. The Pirates are playing for the state championship in Fresno beginning Saturday, in a best-of-3 with Sacramento City College. They were in the same place last year and lost. They have won three of the past 10 state titles and six overall, and there are big banners to that effect on the fence at Pirate Park. The grandpa was Jim Fregosi. He would have been in the midst of Fresno, and he would have been heard. He passed away on a cruise on Valentine’s Day 2014. They called Joey out of class at Murrieta Valley High to tell him. In between, Jim Fregosi Jr. is a special assistant to Royals’ general manager Dayton Moore. He played minor league baseball and knows how the old man could stir up a room, even the outdoor ones. “He lived in Florida,” Joey said, “but he came out as much as he could. He would be in the stands arguing with parents. He was always that guy.” “I remember he was at a basketball game watching one of my kids, who got hit,” Jim Jr. said, “and he wanted to go after the other kid’s parents. He was on the umpires and referees, too. But then he’d be laughing a few seconds later.” Fregosi was the first real star in Angels history and, in 1979, managed the Angels’ first playoff team. He had three other managing jobs, including the Phillies in 1993 when Toronto’s Joe Carter sent a World Series-winning home run over the fence in Game 6. Near the end, with the White Sox, he was having a rough day at shortstop. Pitcher Tom Seaver glared at him all the way into the dugout. Fregosi glared back and said, “Hey, Tom. Pitch around me.” He was blustery and fiery and funny and tyrannically opinionated. As a manager, he spent the pregame hours playing cards with the 20-game winner and .200 hitters alike. “He taught me all those games, too, like gin and poker and blackjack,” Joey said. “Gin was his favorite. “I remember going to my grandma’s house and seeing old pictures, seeing the contracts that he signed. Back then they were on index cards. That was pretty neat.” But even though baseball kids have genetic advantages, their fathers weren’t there to refine them. The elder Fregosi was playing and managing when Jim Jr. grew up, and Jim Jr. is often watching somebody’s batting practice when Joey is playing. “My wife (Mary) is the MVP,” Jim Jr. said. “She’s the one who took Joey to all the games and practices. Nowadays you can follow the games on your phone. Often I’m in the hotel room writing up my reports when he’s playing. That’s just the baseball life. I grew up with it and he did too.” Joey has been banged up much of the year. He is hitting .257. A couple of weeks ago, he tripled down the right-field line to turn a 7-6 lead into a 9-6 playoff win over Long Beach City. Joey was headed to New Mexico, where his dad played, but academics sent him to Orange Coast. “You’re in junior college for a reason,” he said. Cumberland University, an NAIA school in Lebanon, Tenn., has offered him a ride next year. He might never find better competition than in the Orange Empire Conference, which sent four teams to the playoffs this year. The Pirates are 35-8-1. Catcher/DH Tyler Lasch has a 1.067 OPS, Murphy Stehly is hitting .383 as “our do-everything shortstop,” according to coach John Altobelli. Davis Delorefice is hitting .370 and leads the club with four saves. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The late Dan Quisenberry, Kansas City’s All-Star closer, played at OCC. So did former Angels Daryl Sconiers and Donnie Hill and current Seattle Mariners reliever Brandon Brennan. “Most people that we play, you’re going to see them at the next level,” Joey said. “Seven or eight of us were in Fresno last year. We know what it’s like.” Somehow Jim Jr. finds himself in Oakland this weekend, adding to what scouts call their “coverage.” Fresno is 175 miles east. “There’s a chance,” he said, “that I might be able to slip away.”