Vineyard Vines

24 Feb 19
Our Awesome World Adventure

After leaving our friends in Oregon we headed south towards California, we had quite a lot planned for this state and our first stop was to enjoy some of their famous grapes.

24 Feb 19
Temecula Wine Life

Record rain, a giant Snow Moon, and hearty hail heralded in a new season of wine making. Walt and Janeen hosted the first meeting of the year on February 16 and their house was buzzing with excitement and stories of mud canyons, washed away bridges, and new plans for this coming season. Sadly, Mark and […]

24 Feb 19
The Mercury News
Click here if you are having trouble viewing the slideshow on a mobile device. Mac McDonald, a winemaker and the co-owner of Vision Cellars in Windsor, stood inside the recreation center at DeFremery Park in West Oakland, talking about the people who typically sample his wine. “I do wine dinners all over,” McDonald said, “and I look at my audience, and I’d say 90 percent of the time there are no African-Americans.” Vision Cellars was one of a dozen black-owned wineries featured Saturday at the 8th annual Black Vines tasting event. Larry Strickland — an aficionado of wine from Vallejo, but not a producer — said he came to the event in part because he rarely comes across wine made by vintners who look like him, and wanted to support those winemakers. The wine tasting was billed as “a celebration of black wineries and diverse art.” Vendors poured samples of pinot noir and sangria for about 400 attendees. Artists and craftspeople displayed paintings, wine glasses and decorative items, all for sale. Fern Stroud, who founded Black Vines, said the events show consumers that they have options to support black-owned wine businesses, and seek to make wine tasting — which can be an intimidating setting for anyone who hasn’t studied grape varietals and tannins — more accessible. “You have to take that stigma off of wine tasting,” Stroud said, “and make it fun, make it interactive — make it not so up tight.” OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 23: Fern Stroud, founder of Black Vines-A Toast to Black Wineries and Diverse Art is photographed during Black Vines-A Toast to Black Wineries and Diverse Art at De Fremery Park in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group) She compared the wine business to another industry often criticized for being long on money but short on diversity: Tech. For black vintners, she said, “Oftentimes there aren’t very many events where they’re well represented. “But once you know people and create those networks — just like the networks with black tech groups — you have networks of black winemakers that can continue to grow,” she said. Events like Black Vines also help smaller operations find new customers, Stroud said. “Once you know someone behind the scenes, it gives you a different appreciation for their art,” she said. Paula Harrell first brought her wine label’s offerings to Black Vines soon after launching the business in 2015. A relative newcomer to the industry, her label, P. Harrell Wines, faces an uphill battle in the wine industry, competing with longer-running and more well-established brands and vineyards that have often been passed down through generations. “I came to this event, and there were hundreds of people there, and I got a ton of exposure,” Harrell said. Today, Harrell sells some wine to restaurants and is working on getting her products onto  the shelves of retail stores. But the bulk of her business remains the wine she sells — online or in person — directly to consumers at events like Black Vines. “You just never hear” about black-owned wineries, said Marietta Corgile, an Oakland resident who came to the tasting with a group of girlfriends. But Corgile was getting to know about them now. Taking a break from the crowds buzzing around the wineries’ tables, she was a fan of the one in her glass — a zinfandel from Harrell’s label. Marilyn Baker of Oakland said she takes an occasional trip to Napa Valley winemakers, but only knew of one black-owned winery in the area, and hasn’t been there to visit. “I didn’t know there were so many of them,” she said.
23 Feb 19

#partner | Thank you NetGalley and Graydon House for the free review copy. This is a story about two lifelong best friends, Mallory and Kelly, gone their separate ways after a falling out right before starting college. With an alternating then/now timeline, light begins to be shed on what drew their friendship apart all those […]

23 Feb 19
Tourism News | eTN.travel

Do you know the best French wine and the 2nd best destination in France? If you said Bordeaux – you would be correct! Not only are the wines of Bordeaux among the best on the planet, the city is the second most popular destination in France (Paris takes first place). At this time, there are […]

23 Feb 19
CULINARY ROOTS & RECIPES™

TEROLDEGO ROTALIANO – Red Served during the famous Council of Trento (1545-1563) the red Teroldego might as well be considered the prince of Trentino’s red wines. To recognize its authentic provenience and local denomination in 1971 the name Rotaliano was added to it referring to the plane where this wine thrives best. With its origin […]

23 Feb 19
Why Ought To I Get A Wine Club Membership

Do you consider yourself a wine connoisseur? Well if you don’t, then it’s time you found out a little more information about wine. It goes great with meals, and it makes for a great social setting. You can make your social time a little less stressful by knowing more about wine and how to use […]

23 Feb 19
Wine Cooler Appliances

Few things in life have the ability to enchant and delight the way a perfect glass of wine can. In order to truly revel in the glories of the vine, it is necessary to take a bit of time and learn all you can about the subject. The article that follows is intended to help […]

23 Feb 19
DebDays

Amos 9:13“Behold, days are coming,” declares the LORD, “when the plowman will overtake the reaper and the treader of grapes him who sows seed; When the mountains will drip sweet wine and all the hills will be dissolved.”’ (NAS)             Trains are a common way of travel in Italy.  Trains can traverse the Mediterranean coastline from France to […]

23 Feb 19
Vancouver Sun

Tucked between bottles of wine, candles and jelly jars in The View Winery gift shop is a wooden sign that captures the optimism many Kelowna winemakers are embracing this winter: “If you pour it, they will come.” This snowy season over half of Kelowna’s 40-plus wineries are open for wine tasting, offering a more intimate, […]

24 Feb 19
East Bay Times
Click here if you are having trouble viewing the slideshow on a mobile device. Mac McDonald, a winemaker and the co-owner of Vision Cellars in Windsor, stood inside the recreation center at DeFremery Park in West Oakland, talking about the people who typically sample his wine. “I do wine dinners all over,” McDonald said, “and I look at my audience, and I’d say 90 percent of the time there are no African-Americans.” Vision Cellars was one of a dozen black-owned wineries featured Saturday at the 8th annual Black Vines tasting event. Larry Strickland — an aficionado of wine from Vallejo, but not a producer — said he came to the event in part because he rarely comes across wine made by vintners who look like him, and wanted to support those winemakers. The wine tasting was billed as “a celebration of black wineries and diverse art.” Vendors poured samples of pinot noir and sangria for about 400 attendees. Artists and craftspeople displayed paintings, wine glasses and decorative items, all for sale. Fern Stroud, who founded Black Vines, said the events show consumers that they have options to support black-owned wine businesses, and seek to make wine tasting — which can be an intimidating setting for anyone who hasn’t studied grape varietals and tannins — more accessible. “You have to take that stigma off of wine tasting,” Stroud said, “and make it fun, make it interactive — make it not so up tight.” OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 23: Fern Stroud, founder of Black Vines-A Toast to Black Wineries and Diverse Art is photographed during Black Vines-A Toast to Black Wineries and Diverse Art at De Fremery Park in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group) She compared the wine business to another industry often criticized for being long on money but short on diversity: Tech. For black vintners, she said, “Oftentimes there aren’t very many events where they’re well represented. “But once you know people and create those networks — just like the networks with black tech groups — you have networks of black winemakers that can continue to grow,” she said. Events like Black Vines also help smaller operations find new customers, Stroud said. “Once you know someone behind the scenes, it gives you a different appreciation for their art,” she said. Paula Harrell first brought her wine label’s offerings to Black Vines soon after launching the business in 2015. A relative newcomer to the industry, her label, P. Harrell Wines, faces an uphill battle in the wine industry, competing with longer-running and more well-established brands and vineyards that have often been passed down through generations. “I came to this event, and there were hundreds of people there, and I got a ton of exposure,” Harrell said. Today, Harrell sells some wine to restaurants and is working on getting her products onto  the shelves of retail stores. But the bulk of her business remains the wine she sells — online or in person — directly to consumers at events like Black Vines. “You just never hear” about black-owned wineries, said Marietta Corgile, an Oakland resident who came to the tasting with a group of girlfriends. But Corgile was getting to know about them now. Taking a break from the crowds buzzing around the wineries’ tables, she was a fan of the one in her glass — a zinfandel from Harrell’s label. Marilyn Baker of Oakland said she takes an occasional trip to Napa Valley winemakers, but only knew of one black-owned winery in the area, and hasn’t been there to visit. “I didn’t know there were so many of them,” she said.
23 Feb 19
Lady Bird

A warm welcome to this new story! Today I’d like to start a series that will accompany us on a monthly basis throughout the year. Are you in to to see your wine grow, develop and change over the seasons? Isn’t it mind-boggling to watch nature awake after (the European) winter? To witness nature coming […]

23 Feb 19
UPROXX

From Goat Yoga to diving for shipwrecks, we asked adventurer Jessie Festa to share advice for escaping NYC.

23 Feb 19
artisanswiss

The landscape of Swiss vineyards offered a more complicated puzzle in 1880 than it does today. Not only did viticulture suffer a massive decline during the decades of phylloxera infestation, it endured a mass migration from north to south and an alarming loss of diversity. First, some statistics. Zürich’s area under vine fell from 5,279 […]