War

17 Dec 18
Site Title

What is this character? What does it mean? Why do people always talk about ones character how can they call a girl characterless, do they have any proof? Or that girl did something wrong with them? Never judge someone with their outfit or with their actitvities how do you know that what type of war […]

17 Dec 18
Adventures of the 4 JLs

Japan is one of my favorite countries to visit.  The food alone makes it wonderful, but add in the gardens, the history, the feel of the various cities, and the cleanliness, and you have an all the parts of an amazing vacation.  We have been there several times, and each time it has never failed […]

17 Dec 18
Aphoristic Album Reviews

Bob Dylan needs no introduction – he’s one of the key figures in rock music. He helped to define the genre as it matured, especially as a lyricist, broadening the scope of lyrics, taking on both social issues and surreal poetry. Through the 1960s, Dylan never stood still, transitioning from coffee-house folk to protest songs. […]

17 Dec 18
The New Dark Age

Two years of Donald Trump and Benjamin Netanyahu as a Middle East peacemaking team appear to be having a transformative effect – and in ways that will please neither of them.

17 Dec 18
Nothing To Read

The German Chancellor and other European leaders have run out of patience with the President.

17 Dec 18
Berkshire at War

Paupers in Windsor Poor Law Union were allowed extra cash to celebrate peace. December 17th, 1918 Extra Christmas Relief Memorandum from the Local Government Board read authorising Boards of Guardians granting extra relief to recipients of Outdoor Relief this Christmas in view of the cessation of hostilities. Moved by the Chairman. Seconded by Mr Hamilton. […]

17 Dec 18
Emerging Civil War

Find Part 1 with details about Lincoln’s Gingerbread here. Gingerbread in all its variations was a big favorite in the north, the south, and in between. Lebkuchen, the German form of gingerbread, was baked in many “Dutch” households, and others enjoyed squares, loaves, or elegantly molded round Bundt versions of the yummy, rich, spicy traditional […]

17 Dec 18
The Mercury News
Every year, it seems, the task becomes more overwhelming. How do you possibly pare down the massive avalanche of fresh content generated by the networks, cable channels and streamers into a tight little best-of list? Crazy, yes, but we weren’t about to duck the challenge. In order to ease the pain just slightly, we limited our selections to episodic scripted series. That means documentaries, movies and reality shows are out. Here, then, are the Top 10 TV shows of 2018: 1 “Killing Eve” (BBC America) This tantalizing, female-driven thriller from creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge was pegged to a deranged game of cat-and-mouse between a dogged intelligence agent (Sandra Oh) and a sociopathic — also kind of goofy — serial assassin (Jodie Comer) who become obsessed with one another. It sounded like a fairly standard set-up, but “Killing Eve” turned out to be the year’s biggest surprise — a suspenseful, exciting, irreverent, sexy and, at times, laugh-out-loud funny saga bolstered by a couple of marvelous lead performances. 2. “The Americans” (FX) Over its previous five seasons, the relentlessly unnerving Cold War spy show established itself as one of TV’s best-ever dramas. But could it stick the landing in its sixth and final go-around? Mission accomplished. The end journeys of covert Soviet agents Elizabeth and Philip Jennings (Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys) — and other key characters — were perfectly calibrated. Even the melancholy (and violent-free) series finale felt right, with the Jennings discovering the painful price for their lifelong loyalty to Mother Russia. 3. “Atlanta” (FX) If any show seemed susceptible to a sophomore slump, it was Donald Glover’s audacious masterwork — the recipient of rapturous raves and shiny awards in its initial season. But instead of trying to replicate the achievement, Glover and Co. went all “Tiny Toons Adventures” on us and re-wrote the playbook. The result was an ambitious, experimental, surreal, unnerving and unpredictable collection of episodes that challenged our notions of what TV could be. That, and Glover’s pale-faced Tony Perkins just might haunt our nightmares for years. 4. “Better Call Saul” (AMC) So long, Jimmy McGill, we hardly knew ye. In Season 4 of the “Breaking Bad” prequel, Bob Odenkirk’s lawyer embraced his dark side, finally morphing into Saul Goodman, the corrupt con man we love to hate. And even though we’ve always known where this grim journey was headed, the series still managed to surprise, disturb, and, yes, amuse, us. Odenkirk, as usual, was amazing. So too was Rhea Seehorn as Jimmy’s girlfriend, Kim, who unlike us, sadly didn’t see the big change coming. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”5758728,5762055,5758908″] 5. “Kidding” (Showtime) Both hilarious and heartbreaking, this character study starring Jim Carrey as a kindly Mr. Rogers-like icon of children’s TV made for a mind-blowing experience. Steadfastly cheery and optimistic, Carrey’s “Mr. Pickles” sees his personal life begin to unravel in the wake of a family tragedy. Observing him try to hold himself together in a cynical and ruthless world became close to unbearable at times. But this show was like nothing else on television — and I couldn’t take my eyes off it. 6. “Homecoming” (Amazon Prime) It’s nothing new to see established movie stars embrace the small screen. Still, when Julia Roberts does TV, it’s a pretty big deal. Fortunately, this taut and visually adventurous political thriller about a mysterious military research center was worthy of the hype. As a therapist working with soldiers fresh off the battlefield, Roberts imbues the story with the emotional heft it deserves, and director Sam Esmail (“Mr. Robot”) hits all the right eerie notes while channeling suspense masters Alfred Hitchcock and Brian De Palma. 7. “GLOW” (Netflix) Season 2 of this dramedy about the 1980s-era Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling went bigger, badder and bawdier  — combining high-flying stunts with over-the-top hilarity. But it also pulled no punches when it came to confronting serious issues such as racial stereotypes and sexual harassment. Along the way, “GLOW” continued to deepen its character relationships while offering up moments of warmth, redemption and even poignancy as it celebrated kick-butt girl power inside and outside the ring. 8. “Succession” (HBO) To tell the truth, I wasn’t ready to embrace a story about an ultra-wealthy family of nasty, selfish, foul-mouthed, power-hungry jerks. Haven’t we been subjected to enough of that in our real-life news coverage? But this well-cast satire was so crammed with precisely drawn characters and surprising plot twists that it quickly grew on me over its summer run. And in between all the belly laughs, it delivered lots of razor-sharp observations about bloated media empires, entitlement and the perils of capitalistic greed. 9. “Barry” (HBO) Bill Hader as a hitman-turned-actor? The premise appeared to have all the sustainability of a “Saturday Night Live” sketch. But this was Hader as we’d never seen him before, delivering a sublime, full-bodied performance as the disillusioned title character — a low-rent killer who discovers long-dormant feelings, and a sense of community, when he joins a theatre troupe. And then there was Henry Winkler, an absolute hoot as his vain acting teacher. “Barry” cleverly avoided all the usual tropes as it grew funnier, darker and richer with each episode. 10. “Pose” (FX) Plenty of critics fawned over Ryan Murphy’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace,” but this groundbreaking drama series from Murphy and his team stuck with me more. It tapped into a culture unfamiliar to many of us — the sparkly 1980s ballroom scene in the LGBTQ community — and instantly had viewers rooting for its scrappy outcasts as they battled for gaudy trophies, social acceptance and, in some cases, their lives. Bolstered by a stellar, fresh-faced cast (a special shout out to Indya Moore), “Pose” was both joyously entertaining and full of heart. Contact Chuck Barney at cbarney@bayareanewsgroup.com. Follow him at Twitter.com/chuckbarney and Facebook.com/bayareanewsgroup.chuckbarney.
17 Dec 18
Deadline

Following weeks of speculation, outgoing ABC Entertainment president Channing Dungey is officially joining Netflix in a senior leadership role as Vice President of Original Content, reporting to Cindy Holland, Vice President of Original Content. She is expected to start in February. In this newly created role, Dungey will partner with Holland in setting strategy for Netflix’s […]

17 Dec 18
Kings of Screams

The robotics company Knightscope Inc. was founded in 2013. Based in Silicon Valley, California, the company’s goal is to design and build an Autonomous Data Machine which will be used to monitor crimes in large public areas such as malls, parking lots, and neighborhoods. The company was said to be founded in response to the […]

17 Dec 18
Shipwrecked

Portrait project paying tribute to the United States Air Force F105 Thunderchief pilots who took part in Operation Rolling Thunder during the Vietnam War. — Read on cademartin.com/overwar/ Air Force Thud Pilots — Don’t pass this up!

17 Dec 18
Nachrichten Welt

Brian Kelly von Notre Dame ist der Football-Trainer des Associated Press College des Jahres und der dritte Trainer, der die Auszeichnung zweimal gewonnen hat, seit er 1998 gegründet wurde.               Kelly erhielt 16 von 58 Erstplatzierten von den AP-Wahlwählern und insgesamt 81 Punkten. Nick Saban aus Alabama war mit 16 Erstplatzierten und 66 Punkten Zweiter, und […]

17 Dec 18
Equine History Collective

  Alexandra Lotz Founder, Horses & Heritage Ph.D. Candidate, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg (GER) M.A., World Heritage Studies M.Sc., Building and Conservation Dipl. Ing. Interior Architecture   What got you in to history? horse history? Horses and history are a combination of my two great passions. As child I visited Marbach State Stud, one […]

17 Dec 18
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Last week something historic happened in the US Senate. For the first time in 45 years, a chamber of the US Congress voted to pull US forces from a military conflict under the 1973 War Powers Act. While there is plenty to criticize in the War Powers Act, in this situation it was an important tool used by a broad Senate coalition to require President Trump to end US participation in the Saudi war against Yemen. And while the resolution was not perfect – there were huge loopholes – it has finally drawn wider attention to the US Administration’s dirty war in Yemen. The four year Saudi war on neighboring Yemen has left some 50,000 dead, including many women and children. We’ve all seen the horrible photos of school buses blown up by the Saudis – using US-supplied bombs loaded into US-supplied aircraft. Millions more face starvation as the infrastructure is decimated and the ports have been blocked to keep out humanitarian aid. Stopping US participation in this brutal war is by itself a wise and correct move, even if it comes years too late. The Senate vote is also about much more than just Yemen. It is about the decades of Presidential assaults on the Constitution in matters of war. President Trump is only the latest to ignore Article I, Section 8 of the US Constitution, which grants war power exclusively to Congress. Yes, it was President Obama who initially dragged the US illegally into the Yemen war, but President Trump has only escalated it. And to this point Congress has been totally asleep. Fortunately that all changed last week with the Senate vote. Unfortunately, Members of the House will not be allowed to vote on their own version of the Senate resolution. Republican Leadership snuck language into a rule vote on the Farm Bill prohibiting any debate on the Yemen war for the rest of this Congressional session. As Rep. Thomas Massie correctly pointed out, the move was both unconstitutional and illegal. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]However as is often the case in bipartisan Washington, there is plenty of blame to go around. The Republicans were able to carry the vote on the rule – and thus deny any debate on Yemen – only because of a group of Democrats crossed over and voted with Republicans. Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer is being blamed by progressives for his apparent lack of interest in holding his party together. Why would Democrats help a Republican president keep his war going? Because, especially when you look at Congressional leadership, both parties are pro-war and pro-Executive branch over-reach. They prefer it to be their president who is doing the over-reaching, but they understand that sooner or later they’ll be back in charge. As I have often said, there is too much bipartisanship in Washington, not too much partisanship. Americans should be ashamed and outraged that their government is so beholden to a foreign power – in this case Saudi Arabia – that it would actively participate in a brutal war of aggression. Participating in this war against one of the world’s poorest countries is far from upholding “American values.” We should applaud and support the coalition in the Senate that voted to end the war. They should know how much we appreciate their efforts. Dr. Ron Paul is a former member of the House of Representatives. This article was written for and published by the Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity.