Washburn

17 Jul 19
Wyo4News

Results from Performance #5, Tuesday 7/16/19 Performance #6, Wednesday, 7/17, 9:00 a.m., Sweetwater Events Complex Barrel Racing Performance 5 Tuesday 7:00 PM 1. (MN) Austyn Tobey, Bemidji, Minn., 17.527 2. (CO) Grace Hill, Peyton, Colo., 17.792 3. (UT) Amanda Butler, Payson, Utah, 17.796 4. (OK) Paige Jones, Wayne, Okla., 17.815 5. (AB) Reata Schlosser, Nanton, […]

17 Jul 19
KSNT
As multiple former local baseball players were inducted into the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame, Washburn Rural’s Payton Smith got the nod as the 2019 senior player of the year. The Barton baseball commit hit .413 with nine doubles and four home runs his senior year and even won a home run derby at the Marlins’ stadium during his career. But he was fired up to be honored with a hometown award. “I’ve been recognized down in Miami at a home run derby, and everything but this would probably mean a little bit more to me just because it’s my hometown, people I know, all that kind of stuff, that I get to share this with,” Smith said.
17 Jul 19
Full Press Coverage

An arrest has been in the double-shooting that injured New York Giants rookie cornerback Corey Ballentine and killed his Washburn University teammate and best friend, Dwane Simmons. Francisco Alejandro Mendez, 18, was charged Friday in Topeka, Kan. with first-degree murder in the death of Simmons and attempted first-degree murder in the shooting of Ballentine. Mendez […]

17 Jul 19
News Directory

A collection of tidbits from a week in Las Vegas… 1. Not only did the Celtics center, Robert Williams, come on a six – year lighter series, but he also showed a new sports ink around his neck. The tattoo reads “LOE,” with the “O” in heart shape. These three letters can also be found […]

17 Jul 19
The Call to Cook

I’ve been up since 5:30 a.m. Breakfast preparation at Camp Lookout begins at 6 a.m. Dinner preparation begins at 4 p.m. Four hours later, I walked out of the Lookout kitchen and started working on my computer. My feet hurt in a way that almost alarms me. My back hurts. My brain is scattered. I’m […]

17 Jul 19

After years in the Chicago area, Rebecca Rego recently took her talents to Louisville. On the heels of her latest release with her band The Trainmen, she returned to the Windy City to play two shows on Sunday. The first was a benefit for the Chicago Urban Beekeeping Project. The second was in the lounge […]

16 Jul 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
WATSONVILLE — When she saw the photo of Larkin Valley School from the 1930s in the Sentinel, Cleone Tarr recognized herself immediately. “I couldn’t believe it. I thought, oh my gosh, that’s 70 or 80 years ago!” said Tarr, a long-time Watsonville resident who turned 90 in January. The photo, which shows Tarr writing on the chalkboard at the back of the one-room school while the other students study at their desks, was published June 23 from the Washburn Collection as part of the Sentinel’s Focal Point series. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the county had dozens of one-room school houses. Eventually, most of these closed as “unified” districts were formed and students were bussed to larger schools. The tiny Larkin Valley School, shown here in the late 1930s, was established in 1875 and shut its doors for the last time in 1946. (Washburn Collection, Capitola Historical Museum) Focal Point showcases historic photos and is published on the second page of the Community section on Sundays. The photos are provided by the Capitola Museum. For information, visit cityofcapitola.org or call 831-464-0322. The one-room school in the photo, Larkin Valley School, opened in 1875 and educated the local students from first to eighth grade until it closed in 1946. During her time there, Tarr remembers being taught reading, writing, penmanship, history, math and music by Mrs. Flath, who was also the teacher when Tarr’s mother attended Larkin Valley. Flath loved music, and so Larkin Valley had not only a harmonica band, a photo of which was also published in the Sentinel[cq comment=”should this be Focal Point now”] and features Tarr playing in the front row, but also an a cappella group. “We even ended up in a competition in San Jose,” Tarr said. “We didn’t win anything, but we had a lot of fun.” A trip to San Jose in the late 1930s was a big event “because we didn’t have a school bus. It was even before running water. We had to live with an outhouse.” “It was grand,” Tarr said, looking back on the trip. Like most one-room schools, Larkin Valley did not have many students, with only about 29 students in the entire class. While the class size may have been small, having one classroom with every grade level posed some unique challenges for the teachers at one-room schools. Cindy Weiss, a teacher at a one-room school from 1972 to 1989, explained that teachers “have to teach all the subjects for all the grade levels, without individual time with each grade.” In order to accommodate the wide range of age and ability levels, many teachers would choose a topic, such as the Gold Rush, and then break it down so that the older kids had harder assignments, such as writing paragraphs, while the younger kids had easier assignments, such as coloring. While the process is difficult, Weiss said that “if a teacher can rise to the challenge, they will be a better teacher in the long run because they will understand the growth process of a student from age 5 to 14.” Having such a wide range of ages also had benefits for the teacher. “What starts to develop is a family situation,” Weiss said. “It happens naturally. The older kids adopt the younger kids. They play together and the older kids start helping the younger kids and they love doing it,” said Weiss. While Tarr was one of the few young students who was able to read when she entered school, she also remembers the older children sharing desks and helping the younger students, especially the younger ones who did not know how to read yet. “I learned right away how to share with the other kids,” said Tarr. “When it’s your turn, it’s your turn, and you had to be sure that the other kids had their turn.” Cleone Tarr stands in front of the one-room schoolhouse she attended in the late 1930s. The building is now a house undergoing renovation. (Alexandra Fischer — Sentinel) [cq comment=”new quote”] One-room schools such as Larkin Valley used to be prolific in Santa Cruz County. According to “Going to School in Santa Cruz County” by Margaret Koch, during 1899 there were 46 one-teacher schools and 10 two-teacher schools in the county. New schools would start when residents felt that there were enough students in an area to warrant a school. They would then form a school district and put resources toward building a schoolhouse and hiring a teacher. Decades later, with the invention of the school bus, these smaller schools were absorbed by larger, better established schools. While there are now only 10 school districts in the county, there used to be 57. After a break in her education during the ninth grade, Tarr was determined to return and graduate with the same group of students she went to Larkin Valley with. “The same children I started with in the first grade I wanted to finish with in high school,” said Tarr. “We were lifetime friends.”[cq comment=”new quote, might want to get rid of last sentence of this paragraph”] By then, school buses had been invented and students were starting to attend the larger schools in the area. Based on praise from her past teachers, Tarr entered the 10th grade with her Larkin Valley classmates and graduated from Watsonville High School in 1946. Soon after, Tarr married at age 18 and started a family, including two daughters and her son John, who reached out to the Sentinel about this story.
16 Jul 19
hookedne

What a fish! Steve Hedley caught this 19lb leviathan on a Mepps at Northumbrian Water’s Fontburn Reservoir. Another 9lb rainbow was caught this week. 16/07/19 All our local rivers are on the bare bones at present and are in desperate need of rainfall to clear out algae etc and bring in runs of fish. Fish […]

16 Jul 19
PursuitUP

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16 Jul 19
The Call to Cook

This morning, I helped make a bread pudding using leftover rolls. I cleaned up a breakfast buffet table where 87 campers in the 5th and 6th grades spilled chocolate gravy and dribbled their eggs. Yesterday, I diced tomatoes and cut a sheet cake into 100 slices. I helped stack bottles of tomato ketchup and huge […]

16 Jul 19
Piece of Mindful

The plant to the left is commonly known as “Everts Thistle,”named after Truman Everts, a low-level bureaucrat who used its roots to survive during a 37-day ordeal that lasted from September 9 to October 15, 1870. The plant was and is abundant in Yellowstone National Park. This post is not part of the normal fare […]

16 Jul 19
KSNT
The Capper Foundation is hosting the “i Can Swim” Program this week at Washburn University’s Lee Arena swim pool.  i Can Swim is a program sponsored by i Can Shine, Inc.  i Can Shine Inc. also underwrites the i Can Bike and i Can Dance Programs. The goal of the  i Can Swim program is to teach children with disabilities to become comfortable in the water. i Can Shine Instructors, Gabey Davis of Milwaukee, Wisc, and Ivy Satterwhite of Greensboro, N.C. provide instruction on water safety and having the children feel comfortable in the water. Capper Foundation Speech & Language Pathologist, Jenny Stous directed this week’s i Can Swim Program which included 5 classes with 6 students in each class.  i Can Shine Instructors were assisted by local volunteers from the Topeka area. This year’s Capper Foundation i Can Swim Program was underwritten by the Aim 5 Foundation. The program concludes at the end of the week.
16 Jul 19
The Chestnut Post

Troy Dayton, Founder and CEO, Arcview Group We see Arcview as the true ‘north star’ in the cannabis sector for investors looking to find quality investment opportunities as well as entrepreneurs seeking to acquire capital… OAKLAND, Calif. (PRWEB) July 16, 2019 The Arcview Group, the premier cannabis industry investor network, connecting accredited investors with cannabis […]

16 Jul 19
Parallelograms

A playlist Tom Waits 22 de Junho de 2015 A sequência 01 – Ol’ 55 Closing Time, 1973 Well, my time went so quicklyI went lickety-splitly out to my ol’ fifty-fiveAs I pulled away slowly, feeling so holyGod knows I was feeling alive Now the sun’s coming up, I’m riding with Lady LuckFreeway cars and […]

16 Jul 19
Jessicamap Reviews

Is this new novel better than Star Wars?

16 Jul 19
Barrington Homebuyers

realtor.com Buying a home for less than $100,000 isn’t just some tall tale your granddad might tell, evoking an era when all it took to secure a mortgage was a firm handshake with the local banker. In fact, cut-rate home-buying opportunities still exist—if you know where to look. Never daunted in our quest for housing […]