Wiking

10 Jun 19
Thrive Global
Benjamin Franklin once said, “Happiness consists more in small conveniences or pleasures that occur every day, than in great pieces of good fortune that happen but seldom.” Finland, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, and Sweden are ranked among the top happiest places in the world. With a focus on balance and connection, each country has developed its own way of living life to the fullest. Millions of Scandinavians enjoy a healthy work-life balance, high standards of living with less pressure, less stress, and more time for everything they enjoy and love doing. Looking for a lifestyle change? Use some of these Scandinavian life philosophies to change your perception about living a meaningful and fulfilling life. Rethinking the keys to happiness. Lagom Lagom (pronounced “lar-gohm”) is is a huge part of the culture in Sweden. It means “Not too little. Not too much. Just right.” This single word encapsulates the entire Swedish socially democratic philosophy on life: that everyone should have enough but not too much. The concept encourages an overarching balance across our lives: everything in moderation. At the office, professionals who work hard — but not to the detriment of other parts of their lives — are following the lagom ideal. Rather than burning yourself out with a 60-hour working week and then getting stressed, lagom encourages balance and living somewhere in the middle. Other features include frugality, stress reduction, striking the perfect balance between work and play and focusing on environmental concerns and sustainability. The archetypical Swedish proverb, “Lagom är bäst”, literally means, “The right amount is best” but is also translated as “Enough is as good as a feast” and “There is virtue in moderation”. You are probably exercising lagom is many aspects of your life already. For Swedes, lagom is a lifestyle, a habit of mind. ‘There’s an internal mindset of acceptance and contentment in Sweden. That’s part of the secret to being happy — don’t obsess about it. The philosophy of lagom is beautifully simple, and offers an alternative to the idea of ‘always seeking the next best thing. Anna Brones explains in her book, Live Lagom: Balanced Living the Swedish Way, “Applying a sense of lagom to our everyday lives — in what we eat, what we wear, how we live, how we work — might just be the trick for embracing a more balanced, sustainable lifestyle that welcomes the pleasures of existence rather than those of consumption.” Hygge In both Danish and Norwegian, hygge (pronounced as ‘hoo-guh’) means “to give courage, comfort, joy”. In Denmark, hygge is more than just a word — it’s a central part of the culture. It’s about giving your responsible, stressed-out self a break to live in the moment and enjoy your immediate environment. “It is about enjoying life with friends and family, cherishing the moments. It is about grabbing hold of these moments and making them special. Not rushing through an activity so to move on to the next, it is about taking your time and enjoying what is before you now and not what is to come” says Sofie Pedersen, in her book, Keep Calm & Hygge: A Guide to The Danish Art of Simple & Cosy Living. Hygge is a feeling closely tied to being relaxed, happy, content and at peace with oneself. It is the absence of all pretence and worry. If you take time to lose yourself in a book, take a walk, ride a bike, share a meal, enjoy your favourite TV show with friends and family, or play board games, you are already practising hygge! It’s the pleasure of simply being. You cannot hygge if you are in a hurry or stressed out. “Hygge is about an atmosphere and an experience, rather than about things. It is about being with the people we love. A feeling of home. A feeling that we are safe, that we are shielded from the world and allow ourselves to let our guard down,” writes Meik Wiking, in his book, “The Little Book of Hygge: Danish Secrets To Happy Living”. The hygge lifestyle open to anyone. And it’s one of the best ways to practice self-care that feels sincere. Lykke “Lykke” (pronounced loo-kah) is simply the Danish word for “happiness.” “Copenhagen is probably the most Lykke place in the world. At five o’clock in the afternoon everyone leaves work, rides home on their bicycles, does two hours of creative play with their children, goes out to do a random act of kindness to a stranger who wants to be left in peace, lights five candles and then settles down to watch several episodes of a Scandi-noir TV thriller about some psychopathic paedophile on the loose,” writes Meik Wiking, author of “The Little Book of Lykke: Secrets of the World’s Happiest People”. Happiness isn’t a destination, it’s a habit. It’s what we do to make everything else in life awesome. And to be truly happy, you have to be actively involved in the direction of your life. “…you are the only person alive who has sole custody of your life. Your particular life. Your entire life. Not just your life at a desk, or your life on the bus, or in the car, or at the computer,” says Anna Quindlen, author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life. Strive to install experiences of gratitude, gladness, moderation, accomplishment, feeling successful, feeling that there’s a fullness in your life rather than an emptiness or a scarcity to live life to the fullest. “No people can be truly happy if they do not feel that they are choosing the course of their own life,” states the World Happiness Report 2012. The report also found that having this freedom of choice is one of the six factors that explain why some people are happier than others. Sisu Etymologically, “sisu” (pronounced see’-soo) comes from a Finnish root word that implies “inner” or “inside.” In Finnish culture, it’s about adopting the attitude of persistence and determination. “Sisu is not momentary courage, but the ability to sustain that courage. It is a word that cannot be fully translated. It defines the Finnish people and their character. It stands for the philosophy that what must be done will be done, regardless of cost,” according to Finlandia University. It’s often described as stoic determination, the tenacity of purpose, grit, and resilience. It’s a form of courage that is presented in situations where success is against the odds. It’s about persevering your way through challenges. “It is a compound of bravado and bravery, of ferocity and tenacity, of the ability to keep fighting after most people would have quit, and to fight with the will to win,” The New York Times explained in 1940. Sisu is doing what’s necessary even when it’s difficult. Sisu may be a Finnish word, but it’s a universal trait, says Joanna Nylund, author of Sisu: The Finnish Art Of Courage. Closing thoughts Life is unpredictable, but strong life philosophies can guide the way. A great lifestyle accrues benefits over time. Take time to enjoy life’s journey. “You cannot be really first-rate at your work if your work is all you are,” says Anna Quindlen. Embrace and practice some of these philosophies in your everyday life and, maybe, you’ll find out why Scandinavians are ranked as the happiest people in the world! Originally published on Medium. Follow us here and subscribe here for all the latest news on how you can keep Thriving. Stay up to date or catch-up on all our podcasts with Arianna Huffington here.
10 Jun 19
Home and garden

Daca ești în căutare de ceva unic și asociat cu o anumită stare a sufletului, ai aterizat la locul potrivit. Nimic nu e o întâmplare și iată povestea noastră. Totul a început când, într-o zi, fiind epuizată după o zi lungă de muncă, căutam niște cărți pentru următoarea mea vacanță. Nu voiam vreo carte SF […]

10 Jun 19
Jules Lea

Last week I narrowed my hobbies to six (reading, writing, gardening, photography, hiking and sewing) and now I’m going to go through each one to decide what is really necessary for the hobby and how to schedule it into my life. Reading: There’s nothing like curling up with a good book.  I love how I […]

07 Jun 19
The Great Morrison Migration

Title: The Little Book of Lykke Author: Meik Wiking Genre: Nonfiction, Life-style Publisher: Penguin Life Publication Date: September 7, 2017 Pages: 288 Format Read: Audiobook Standalone or series: Standalone Where I got the book: Library Libby app Date finished reading: June 1, 2019 Goodreads Description: Lykke (Luu-kah) (n): Happiness It’s easy to see why Denmark is often called the world’s happiest country. Not only do […]

07 Jun 19
Metro
Nothing beats the feeling of making a home your own. From adding a greenhouse-worth of plants to our windowsills or a fresh coat of paint in the living room, everyone enjoys a sense of pride when you stamp your personality on your own place. And according to the new GoodHome Report, a major Europe-wide study of over 13,000 people into how our properties impact our wellbeing commissioned by B&Q in partnership with the Happiness Research Institute, it emerged that our homes are significantly more important to our happiness than our income or even our jobs. However, is this true for millennials? We speak to three home improvers who certainly believe so. In B&Q‘s first Home Improvement Rising Star of the Year competition, launched to celebrate the retailer’s 50th anniversary, this trio of room re-vampers worked on creating a space that represented their personal style – and showed off their practical home improvement skills. So, who won? Our judges – architectural and design historian and broadcaster, Tom Dyckhoff, B&Q Category Director, Surface and Décor, Iain McColgan, and Metro Home Editor, Liz Burcher – had the final say… but which room do you vibe off the most? Project Manager Karl from Manchester Finalist Karl Dixon used his practical home improvement skills to create a room inspired by B&Q’s 50th anniversary (pictured above) What was your vision for the competition challenge?  I wanted to mark B&Q’s 50th anniversary and tried to incorporate 50 into the space. Something or someone hitting 50 years is a massive achievement, so this space is for people to relax in and think about the past 50 years, then also think about what the future 50 years has in store. I feel the area I created was modern, tailored and clean. What first got you into home improvement? I bought a derelict house as I wanted a challenge! It was crazy; I had to gut the entire thing. Visually, I am OK with that, but manually, I had never done anything like it before. So, when I bought this house I was like, ‘What have I done? What have I got myself into?’ Over two years, I learned the skills as I went. I literally had no clue, so just looked at guides and videos on B&Q’s YouTube channel. How did it feel when you completed your home renovation? I wanted to take on the challenge and it made me feel proud to know that I’ve basically rebuilt my own house. It’s so rewarding, especially when people come round and say: “This is lovely.” I’m so proud of it – it’s my dream home and it’s somewhere I can relax and entertain, and it’s where I want to see my family grow up. [metro-fact-box title=”Happy home, happy life: GoodHome Report top tip…” colour=”orange” icon=”no-icon”] Invite people in Just like Karl, most of us are happier when we invite people over to share our homes with us. The GoodHome Report found that this increases pride in our pads, as well as boosting the emotional connection we feel with where we live. [/metro-fact-box] In his competition room set up, Karl showcased a range of skills from painting to building furniture (final room set up above) Home improvement skills demonstrated: Building flat packed items (including Bergen Coffee 3 Drawer Chest (H)834mm (W)804mm (D)410mm, £119 at B&Q) Laying down vinyl flooring (using Grey Oak Effect Vinyl Flooring, 4m² , £24 at B&Q) Adding picture rail (using Primed MDF Picture rail (T)18mm (W)44mm (L)2400mm, £4.73 each at B&Q) Painting the room using a roller (with Dulux Easycare Overtly olive Matt Emulsion paint 2.5L at £20 at B&Q) Adding wallpaper below the rail (using Boutique Sorrento Storm Glitter Wallpaper, £20 per roll at B&Q) Primary School Teacher Lisa from Wolverhampton    Primary school teacher Lisa decided to use her love of colour and crafts in her competition room set up, which had a Secret Garden theme (above) (Disclaimer: This image features a mock set design which demonstrates the entrant’s DIY skillset for the purposes of the competition. Readers are advised to consider recommended safety requirements when decorating a nursery) What was your thinking process behind your competition set?  My inspiration for this baby’s bedroom was not only the symbol of new life, but also the idea of bringing the outdoors in with the Secret Garden. As I chose my products, I wanted to incorporate the beauty of nature and its vivid colour palette. I dreamed of surrounding the baby with symbols of love and joy, such as the hummingbirds, and growth through the plants and flower prints. Ultimately, I intended to construct a room filled with happiness and love, which it was certainly created with! What makes a great room for you? It has to be something colourful and uplifting – I like to think that I may live in Wolverhampton, but my lounge feels like it could be anywhere! I think sometimes people are scared of colour, but I love the idea of colour contrasting – like the quaint holiday streets of Spain or Portugal – and introduced this to my competition set-up. Do you think a home can boost your personal happiness? Yes! The way you choose colours can leave such a lasting, positive impact on you. I think the way we decorate our homes has a huge effect on the way we feel. I love the way people feel when they visit my house and I like to have objects around me that make me feel happy. Lisa’s room featured her own paintings, love of bright colours and a simple backdrop (Disclaimer: This image features a mock set design which demonstrates the entrant’s DIY skillset for the purposes of the competition. Readers are advised to consider recommended safety requirements when decorating a nursery) [metro-fact-box title=”Happy home, happy life: GoodHome Report top tip…” colour=”orange” icon=”no-icon”] Put your own stamp on it Whether we rent or own, finding ways to add your personality – from painting a wall to hanging a picture of our loved ones just like Lisa has done in her own home and competition set up – will make our homes a little happier (and more interesting!). [/metro-fact-box] Home improvement skills demonstrated: Handpainted designs (using GoodHome Durable Matt Emulsion paint at B&Q) Building flat packed items using power tools and a hammer (including Mixxit White 3 Cube shelving unit (H)1080mm (W)390mm, £30 at B&Q). Chalkboard paint used in picture frames to create mini chalk boards (hung in Black Single frame MDF Picture frame (H)400mm x (W)300mm, £5 at B&Q). Mounting a mirror, blind and shelves (including Colours Frameless Circular Mirror (H)400mm 400mm, £15 at B&Q).  Student Sumaiyyah from East London Student Sumaiyyah rocked Scandi-chic in her competition room, combining cool, modernist furniture from B&Q with pops of colour What was your vision for the competition? I decided to use the space assigned to design a living room. I went for my go-to look, which is inspired by Scandinavian interior design; portrayed through its minimalism, functionality and beauty. The finishing product was a beautiful, open, fresh, inviting living room. Using a combination of the right B&Q products, an eye for detail and a flair for design, I was able to create the perfect living room, whilst staying within a budget and prioritising functionality. Why is creating your own space so important to you?  As I still live at home with a large family, having my own space is so important. I actually came back from uni to find my sister had stolen my room! So, my first home improvement experience was changing the spare room into my own oasis. Do you think it has an impact on your happiness? Yes! What I really love about interiors and home improvement is that the small changes can make a massive difference. But what I really think is that your outer space and surroundings have a huge impact on your inner space – your mental and emotional space. So, if you have a clear, fresh room and home, I believe you have a clear, fresh mind. [metro-fact-box title=”Happy home, happy life: GoodHome Report top tip…” colour=”orange” icon=”no-icon”] Make time for change The GoodHome Report found that investing time and energy into updating where we live and adapting them to our changing needs is an investment in our happiness, the same way Sumaiyyah made an area of her family home her own. [/metro-fact-box] She proved her skills by building flatpack furniture, hanging mirrors and paintings and painting her backdrop – but was it enough to win? Home improvement skills demonstrated: Painting the room white using a roller (using Dulux pure brilliant white matt emulsion paint 5l, £16 at B&Q).  Building flat packed furniture (including Morillo Metal 2 seater Coffee table, £19 at B&Q). Hanging heavy wall items such as the mirror (such as Colours kahiwa oak effect framed rectangular mirror (W)920mm, £30 at B&Q). Assembling the light (Bernier Black Floor Lamp, £35 at B&Q). Creating storage space (Mixxit White 6 Cube shelving unit, £45 at B&Q) [metro-fact-box title=”And the winner of B&Q’s Home Improvement Rising Star of the Year competition is…” colour=”grey” icon=”trophy”] … LISA!  Primary school teacher Lisa has the honour of being named the first ever B&Q Home Improvement Rising Star of the Year. Here’s what our three judges – architectural and design historian and broadcaster, Tom Dyckhoff, B&Q Category Director, Surface and Décor, Iain McColgan, and Metro Home Editor, Liz Burcher – thought… Tom: There are a lot of elements in the room, which is great. It’s great to see a kid’s room so joyful and full of colour and interest. I like how Lisa demonstrated some key skills, rather than simply styling a room. Liz: Whether you own your house or you rent it, it would be possible to use Lisa’s ideas as inspiration. Fabulous – and, for me, an absolute clear winner. Iain: Loving that the inspirational trigger was in symbolising a new life. A great choice of catalyst to drive anyone to do their very best. Do you want to unlock the happiness in your home? If you want to feel proud of your personal space like our three finalists, head online to B&Q or read more findings from the GoodHome Report here. Co-authored by Meik Wiking, who wrote best-seller The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well, it offers advice and tips on how taking pride in your house can make you happier. Watch Meik’s video in full HERE or head to B&Q online for further inspiration on how you can put a positive stamp on your pad. [metro-video id=”1940306″ video=”https://videos.metro.co.uk/video/met/2019/06/06/8604804338135842072/960x540_MP4_8604804338135842072.mp4″ image=”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/06/06/10/14442830-0-image-a-8_1559812492751.jpg”%5D [/metro-fact-box]
07 Jun 19
Food, Obviously

Around a year ago, I went to Copenhagen during the spring. I actually wanted to visit Denmark during autumn-winter time for the sake of experiencing hygge. Yes, I was inspired by and curious about hygge. I don’t remember how I first knew hygge. But of course, I also bought the book ‘The Little Book of […]

07 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
The UK is only the fourth happiest place in Europe – when it comes to satisfaction with our homes. Poor natural light, bad air quality and a lack of space were revealed as some of main reasons Brits aren’t satisfied with their living situation. Brits are generally pretty happy with their homes, according to a study The GoodHome Report, the largest study of its kind ever conducted, surveyed 13,489 people across Europe, asking them a series of questions about happiness and the home. And of 10 European countries polled, Brits lagged behind the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark in terms of ‘home happiness’. The startling statistics revealed that despite the trope of location being everything, people viewed having access to green space as more important than where they live. The report was created with independent thinktank The Happiness Research Institute, who stated that whether people lived in the city or countryside, it ‘made no significant difference to happiness.’ Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute, said: “Our research shows that often we look for happiness in the wrong places. “Sometimes what we think makes us happy and what really makes us happy are not the same – the report builds on the belief that our homes shape our lives. “They are where we find comfort and safety, where we let our guard down and connect with our loved ones. “In a world demanding more and more of our attention, our homes are where we can retreat and seek refuge.” Scoring an average of 7.69 out of 10, the Dutch were top of the list when it came to rating how happy they were with their homes. [boxout headline=”HOME HAPPINESS LEVELS ACROSS EUROPE: “]1. Netherlands – 7.69 2. Germany – 7.60 3. Denmark – 7.47 4. UK – 7.40 5. Spain – 7.22 6. France – 7.17 7. Romania – 7.11 8. Italy – 7.02 9. Poland – 6.92 10. Russia – 6.57 [/boxout] [boxout headline=”FIVE TIPS TO A HAPPIER HOME:”]1. Re-arrange your space – Rearranging and improving our homes to create a greater sense of space could therefore be an easy way for many of us to boost our happiness levels. 2. Make time for change – Investing time and energy into updating our homes and adapting them to our changing needs is an investment in our happiness, even if we don’t always enjoy the process! 3. Invite people in – Our homes are happier when we invite people to share them with us. This increases our pride in our homes, as well as the emotional connection we feel with where we live. 4. Get green-fingered – Access to green space makes a big difference to our happiness levels. Even if we don’t have a garden, bringing some greenery into our homes will improve our overall wellbeing. 5. Put your own stamp on it – Whether we rent or own, finding ways to add your personality – from painting a wall to hanging a picture of our loved ones – will make our homes a little happier. [/boxout] They were also the most likely to describe their home as ‘spacious’, with the report stating: “A feeling of spaciousness is three times more important than actual size.” Out of the ten European countries surveyed, the Russians, with an average score of 6.57 came bottom, while Brits came fourth, with an average score of 7.4. The report found our homes account for 15 per cent of our total happiness – with health and fitness scoring 14 per cent, and what we earn just six per cent. Yet one in four homeowners in the UK say they aren’t happy with their home. And while many of us aspire to climb the housing ladder, the report shows that whether we own or rent has little impact on our happiness. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”2″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Véronique Laury, CEO of B&Q owner Kingfisher, said: “I’m convinced that our homes are one of the keys to happiness. That’s why I’ve spent my life working in the home improvement industry and 16 years in this business. “It’s why at Kingfisher, our purpose is to make home improvement accessible for everyone – because we believe everybody should be able to have a home they can feel good about.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.  
07 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
The UK is only the fourth happiest place in Europe – when it comes to satisfaction with our homes. Poor natural light, bad air quality and a lack of space were revealed as some of main reasons Brits aren’t satisfied with their living situation. Brits are generally pretty happy with their homes, according to a study The GoodHome Report, the largest study of its kind ever conducted, surveyed 13,489 people across Europe, asking them a series of questions about happiness and the home. And of 10 European countries polled, Brits lagged behind the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark in terms of ‘home happiness’. The startling statistics revealed that despite the trope of location being everything, people viewed having access to green space as more important than where they live. The report was created with independent thinktank The Happiness Research Institute, who stated that whether people lived in the city or countryside, it ‘made no significant difference to happiness.’ Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute, said: “Our research shows that often we look for happiness in the wrong places. “Sometimes what we think makes us happy and what really makes us happy are not the same – the report builds on the belief that our homes shape our lives. “They are where we find comfort and safety, where we let our guard down and connect with our loved ones. “In a world demanding more and more of our attention, our homes are where we can retreat and seek refuge.” Scoring an average of 7.69 out of 10, the Dutch were top of the list when it came to rating how happy they were with their homes. [boxout headline=”HOME HAPPINESS LEVELS ACROSS EUROPE: “]1. Netherlands – 7.69 2. Germany – 7.60 3. Denmark – 7.47 4. UK – 7.40 5. Spain – 7.22 6. France – 7.17 7. Romania – 7.11 8. Italy – 7.02 9. Poland – 6.92 10. Russia – 6.57 [/boxout] [boxout headline=”FIVE TIPS TO A HAPPIER HOME:”]1. Re-arrange your space – Rearranging and improving our homes to create a greater sense of space could therefore be an easy way for many of us to boost our happiness levels. 2. Make time for change – Investing time and energy into updating our homes and adapting them to our changing needs is an investment in our happiness, even if we don’t always enjoy the process! 3. Invite people in – Our homes are happier when we invite people to share them with us. This increases our pride in our homes, as well as the emotional connection we feel with where we live. 4. Get green-fingered – Access to green space makes a big difference to our happiness levels. Even if we don’t have a garden, bringing some greenery into our homes will improve our overall wellbeing. 5. Put your own stamp on it – Whether we rent or own, finding ways to add your personality – from painting a wall to hanging a picture of our loved ones – will make our homes a little happier. [/boxout] They were also the most likely to describe their home as ‘spacious’, with the report stating: “A feeling of spaciousness is three times more important than actual size.” Out of the ten European countries surveyed, the Russians, with an average score of 6.57 came bottom, while Brits came fourth, with an average score of 7.4. The report found our homes account for 15 per cent of our total happiness – with health and fitness scoring 14 per cent, and what we earn just six per cent. Yet one in four homeowners in the UK say they aren’t happy with their home. And while many of us aspire to climb the housing ladder, the report shows that whether we own or rent has little impact on our happiness. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”2″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Véronique Laury, CEO of B&Q owner Kingfisher, said: “I’m convinced that our homes are one of the keys to happiness. That’s why I’ve spent my life working in the home improvement industry and 16 years in this business. “It’s why at Kingfisher, our purpose is to make home improvement accessible for everyone – because we believe everybody should be able to have a home they can feel good about.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.  
07 Jun 19
The Sun
The UK is only the fourth happiest place in Europe – when it comes to satisfaction with our homes. Poor natural light, bad air quality and a lack of space were revealed as some of main reasons Brits aren’t satisfied with their living situation. Brits are generally pretty happy with their homes, according to a study The GoodHome Report, the largest study of its kind ever conducted, surveyed 13,489 people across Europe, asking them a series of questions about happiness and the home. And of 10 European countries polled, Brits lagged behind the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark in terms of ‘home happiness’. The startling statistics revealed that despite the trope of location being everything, people viewed having access to green space as more important than where they live. The report was created with independent thinktank The Happiness Research Institute, who stated that whether people lived in the city or countryside, it ‘made no significant difference to happiness.’ Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute, said: “Our research shows that often we look for happiness in the wrong places. “Sometimes what we think makes us happy and what really makes us happy are not the same – the report builds on the belief that our homes shape our lives. “They are where we find comfort and safety, where we let our guard down and connect with our loved ones. “In a world demanding more and more of our attention, our homes are where we can retreat and seek refuge.” Scoring an average of 7.69 out of 10, the Dutch were top of the list when it came to rating how happy they were with their homes. [boxout headline=”HOME HAPPINESS LEVELS ACROSS EUROPE: “]1. Netherlands – 7.69 2. Germany – 7.60 3. Denmark – 7.47 4. UK – 7.40 5. Spain – 7.22 6. France – 7.17 7. Romania – 7.11 8. Italy – 7.02 9. Poland – 6.92 10. Russia – 6.57 [/boxout] [boxout headline=”FIVE TIPS TO A HAPPIER HOME:”]1. Re-arrange your space – Rearranging and improving our homes to create a greater sense of space could therefore be an easy way for many of us to boost our happiness levels. 2. Make time for change – Investing time and energy into updating our homes and adapting them to our changing needs is an investment in our happiness, even if we don’t always enjoy the process! 3. Invite people in – Our homes are happier when we invite people to share them with us. This increases our pride in our homes, as well as the emotional connection we feel with where we live. 4. Get green-fingered – Access to green space makes a big difference to our happiness levels. Even if we don’t have a garden, bringing some greenery into our homes will improve our overall wellbeing. 5. Put your own stamp on it – Whether we rent or own, finding ways to add your personality – from painting a wall to hanging a picture of our loved ones – will make our homes a little happier. [/boxout] They were also the most likely to describe their home as ‘spacious’, with the report stating: “A feeling of spaciousness is three times more important than actual size.” Out of the ten European countries surveyed, the Russians, with an average score of 6.57 came bottom, while Brits came fourth, with an average score of 7.4. The report found our homes account for 15 per cent of our total happiness – with health and fitness scoring 14 per cent, and what we earn just six per cent. Yet one in four homeowners in the UK say they aren’t happy with their home. And while many of us aspire to climb the housing ladder, the report shows that whether we own or rent has little impact on our happiness. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”316″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Véronique Laury, CEO of B&Q owner Kingfisher, said: “I’m convinced that our homes are one of the keys to happiness. That’s why I’ve spent my life working in the home improvement industry and 16 years in this business. “It’s why at Kingfisher, our purpose is to make home improvement accessible for everyone – because we believe everybody should be able to have a home they can feel good about.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.  
07 Jun 19
With Love, From Ngoc

About a week ago, I was getting my daily 30 minutes of exercise by blog hopping (that’s what they mean when they say ‘find 30,’ right?) when I stumbled upon Jenna @ Bookmark Your Thoughts‘s response to the Marvel Avengers Book Tag. Now, if you thought I was gonna sit back and let the opportunity to […]

06 Jun 19
M's Mindful Moments

Day Four 6th June It appears I have a treatment & therapy free day today, no physio or OT so I’ve decided to put my earphones in, listen to my yoga music album & write about being hygge. Creating a Hyggekrog… ‘Creating a whatty?’ You may be thinking? So a hyggekrog is basically a ‘nook’ […]

05 Jun 19
The Great Morrison Migration

What are you currently reading? What did you recently finish reading? What do you think you’ll read next? Time for another WWW Wednesdays, which is brought to you by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words. If you too want to participate, answer the above questions and post that link on Sam’s page. I […]

03 Jun 19
John Knox Presbytery

MUSINGS FROM THE STATED CLERK – JUNE 2019 Hygge became part of my vocabulary In January of 2017 when I heard an interview with Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute and research associate for Denmark at the World Database of Happiness. The concept (and, frankly, being able to say the word and its […]

03 Jun 19
Paper & Print

June 6 is the Swedish National Day. I am not Swedish, but my husband is partially Norwegian, which means I have a Norwegian last name and I like to think that gives me a very small connection to Scandinavia. I am sure there are mediocre writers in Sweden. However, I have no idea who they […]