Women Travelers

22 Apr 19
4 Worn Passports

Ethical cultural travel is a very real dilemma. By nature, travelers seek to explore deeply and authentically. They are not satisfied with just looking at the soul-stirring pictures in National Geographic. They want to experience them.

Is it possible to create a win-win for both travelers and ethnic groups? A way for travelers to experience the most intriguing cultural groups in the world without turning them into human zoos?

22 Apr 19
Krystal

“You’ll be in Room 702, Miss Hamm, ” the hotel desk clerk said. “The elevators are right over there.” He might as well have used the public address system to announce, “Got evil on your mind? Woman traveling alone in 702.” You don’t encounter that kind of thoughtless endangerment much anymore…. from latimes.com – Los […]

22 Apr 19
Heavy.com

Forty years young, American Dieter Kowalski was looking forward to returning to Sri Lanka for his job. Tragically, he was one of the 290 people killed in the Easter Sunday terrorist bombings.

22 Apr 19
FamilySearch Blog
If your Chinese ancestors immigrated to North America, you may be able to learn more about them in Canadian or United States records. Here are tips on records that may help you explore your Chinese ancestry. Chinese Immigrants in Census Records Chinese immigrants may appear in censuses, which are descriptive counts of the population. You may discover valuable information, such as a relative’s occupation and approximate year of birth and when the relative immigrated. Because most early Chinese immigrants were male workers who left their loved ones behind in China, you won’t often find them enumerated with their families. The United States has taken national censuses every 10 years since 1790. Chinese immigration became significant after the California Gold Rush began in 1849. Chinese ancestry was first noted in the California census of 1852. Learn more about exploring United States census records. In Canada, national censuses have been taken every 10 years since 1871 and every 5 years since 1971. Most early Chinese immigrants to Canada went to British Columbia. Census records in British Columbia began in 1881. In both countries, Chinese residents were sometimes missed, or their information was written incorrectly. Sometimes Chinese residents avoided census takers. At other times, language and cultural barriers were to blame. Finding Vital Records (Births, Marriages, and Deaths) Records of individuals’ births, marriages, and deaths have been kept by different North American government offices at various times and places. In Canada, these vital records are called civil registration records and are kept by individual provinces. Civil registration began in 1872 in British Columbia; Chinese residents weren’t officially included in these records until 1897. This guide to civil registration records for British Columbia includes links to free FamilySearch collections. Individual states and counties in the United States may have marriage records dating back to when the state or county was organized. Birth and death records weren’t reliably kept in many places until the late 1800s or early 1900s. Learn more about United States vital records here, or read about California vital records here. In both countries, Chinese grave markers may provide additional information about relatives. Tombstones of immigrants may include the deceased’s name and maiden name and that person’s Chinese province or district and village of origin (and, for married females, similar information about her spouse).  Several Chinese cemeteries in California, British Columbia, Hawaii, and other locations are documented on Find A Grave. Tombstones and in other Chinese-language records may use dates specific to the Chinese calendar. Chinese Immigrants in Passenger Lists Chinese immigrants to North America generally landed at West Coast ports. In the United States, San Francisco and Hawaii were the most common destinations. In Canada, look for Chinese passengers arriving in Vancouver, Victoria, and other ports in British Columbia. British Columbia passenger lists don’t begin until 1905, well after the initial surge of Chinese immigration. A collection of Chinese passenger arrival lists for Vancouver (1906–1912, 1929–1941) is available on Ancestry.com and in the Ancestry Library Edition available at family history centers and many public libraries. According to the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California, in the United States “early immigrants and people in steerage were often not listed by name, but as ‘Chinaman’ or not listed at all. If listed on passenger lists after the Exclusion Act, the ancestor was not in steerage, but may have been in second or third class. Travel companions may be listed and their relationship. Women were usually listed with their maiden name and 氏 “Shee” (indicates married woman).” Several key collections relating to Chinese immigrants are available online: Early passenger arrival lists for San Francisco no longer exist. San Francisco passenger arrival lists, 1893–1953 are free to access on FamilySearch.org and include arrivals at Angel Island, which received an estimated 175,000 Chinese immigrants after its opening in 1910. Another FamilySearch collection, California, Chinese Partnerships and Departures from San Francisco, 1893–1943, documents Chinese residents who left the United States and Chinese firms doing business in the United States. California, San Diego, Chinese Passenger and Crew Lists, 1905–1923 is free on FamilySearch.org and focuses on travelers of Chinese descent.The website of the Hawaii State Archive Digital Collections hosts a searchable index to Chinese passenger lists (1843–1900); additional Hawaiian immigration record collections are also available. For many decades, the Canadian and United States governments kept additional documentation on Chinese residents living within their borders. Published Histories about Chinese Americans Even if they don’t specifically mention your relative or family, regional and ethnic history books can help you better understand the experiences of Chinese immigrants and communities. Look for stories about others who may have lived in the same places your family did or who worked in the same occupations. Look for published histories at your library. If it doesn’t have what you’re looking for, ask a reference librarian for help or search for titles on WorldCat.org, an enormous online catalog of materials at thousands of libraries in the United States, Canada, and beyond. You may be able to borrow a book through interlibrary loan. Explore the stacks and online catalogs of genealogy research libraries too. For example, the Family History Library holds a copy of Chasing Their Dreams: Chinese Settlement in the Northwest Region of British Columbia by Lily Chow and Unbound Voices: A Documentary History of Chinese Women in San Francisco by Judy Yung. Learn more about researching your Chinese genealogy How to Find My Chinese Ancestors North American Government Records about your Chinese Immigrant Ancestors Chinese Last Names: A History of Culture and Family Your Chinese American Heritage
22 Apr 19
Thrive Global
I had no expectation what I might experience during my time at sea. I just always dreamt of doing a transatlantic crossing alone and the time had finally come. Maybe it was those old movie scenes of the elegant bejeweled women with white gloves up to their armpits, standing alongside a dashing man in tails out on a polished deck that had always intrigued me. More likely it was the complete joy I feel being out on the ocean that compelled me to join a 15-day sail across the Atlantic from Barbados to Lisbon. No stops, no ports of call. I relished the idea of being surrounded by nothing but the big blue sea. I set sail on the Windstar, a small 4 mast sail-assisted ship with 75 strangers, about half the capacity of passengers the ship can carry. Plenty of room to just be. The Windstar cruise line has been doing this style of luxury sailing for over 30 years so I knew I was in good hands, and fact that the captain of this specific sail was Belinda Bennett, the only female, woman of color ship captain on the sea made me feel just that much more certain I was on the right trip. My trip was billed as more casual with no tuxedos or fancy dinner attire necessary. What you may find on any journey is always an unknown and despite all my comings and goings it’s still one of my favorite aspects of traveling. What I witnessed on this journey was no less inspiring. So, what was it? It was pure and simple; it was true love. Love found late in life, love revisited, and a lot of constant, longstanding committed love renewed again and again. Most of the travelers had done these crossings 5 to 35 times before. They knew they could count on great comfort, great food and a very high level of personal attention and care. Many of the staff and guests had been traveling together for years. Stepping onto the ship allowed everyone an opportunity to relax and suspend real life for a little while. I had no trouble doing just that. Couple at sea This mixed gang of traveling sailors showed up each year to celebrate another milestone in a life long lived. They were predominately older with extra time and a desire to just be one with the sea. They had no agenda other than making another sail across the Atlantic. I fell in love with them all. It was Jean and Mike*, both in their 80’s, back together after 55 years apart, 4 or 5 marriages later and several countries between them, sitting on the deck holding hands or sunbathing together — smiling, whispering, giggling, taking great care of one another’s needs. It was Samuel, who shared the crossing with his wife of over 40 years. 5 children and 19 grandchildren later, he never left the side of his partner who was now slightly confused and unsure of herself while he still remains sharp and robust. I have never seen such unconditional love and patience alongside such great happiness being together. It was Larry, a widower, who was up early each morning writing a book about his recovery after a stroke. He was sharing the trip with a newer love, Janet, who had been a dear friend of his late wife. I watched them laugh often, enjoying every day together. It was Walter, who sat at a table of 6 one evening and expressed his profound love for his new girlfriend with tears of joy streaming down his face. They had met 3 years before on this very same trip. At 85 and 75 respectively, that had both already lived through prior romances and great loss yet were able to feel love again. His claim is that this one, this love is the greatest one of all. Witnessing some of the most vulnerable, open-hearted expressions of love took my breath away. One seafaring couple in their 70’s, rekindled a college connection and got married on the ship 5 years before. They soaked up the sun each day playing board games and puzzles together. Another energetic couple in their 60’s walked and did yoga together each morning. They were thoughtfully trying to navigate the tricky transition of how to retire and still find meaning and purpose in their next chapter. And then there was 91 year old Ken, traveling with his 7th wife, Marci. Ken was still snarky, funny and very smart. He was a formidable trivia and scrabble opponent and held his own at the bridge table. He judged the bartender competition and was more erudite than either of the other judges. Marci took care of every need in the most light-hearted loving way. I saw the great respect she gave to his independent nature while keeping a close watch on him. I was surrounded by people celebrating 50+ year wedding anniversaries, 80th birthdays and brand new love. I never heard a cross word between anyone. Not one. I saw true love in every form, a gentle arm to lean on, a hug, a look, a smile. I felt the love. The love that comes from the wisdom of age and survival. The love that appreciates the fragility of our time and celebrates each day together. This love changed me. It made me more mindful and more hopeful. This love made me feel more expansive about our ability to love at any age, despite great losses. It seems the capacity for love does not diminish with experiences but grows exponentially. This sail filled me with insight and a new, much appreciated perspective. While I was surrounded by all this love I never felt alone or lonely. There were many other men and women who were single or chose to travel without their partners on this sail, as I had. It never felt awkward to be on my own and people were friendly and inclusive whether they were with a partner or group of friends. Someone said this trip attracts a self-selected group of couples that already get along well and want to be together without a lot of distractions for days on end. That’s probably true. How lucky for those of us that were able to experience it with them. Want to read more stories like this one? check out drsharonufberg (*All names have been changed to respect privacy)
22 Apr 19
Robb Report

This year, British Airways celebrates a century in the air. Here’s a look at what’s changed—for better or worse.

22 Apr 19
Blind Mule Blog

There is a neighbor who calls me to her house in the dark of the morning. I’m to take her place when she is gone. She is gone. It’s a sweet place, like the sad spot in the middle of a pound cake. There is coffee with half and half. There is a library with […]

22 Apr 19
Suzi Chase

I’ll state up front I have never seen the movie Green Book. I understand it to be a movie about the black experience made by white people. That alone was enough to convince me to stay away. (For the unfamiliar, the Green Book was a guide published in the mid 20th century to help black […]

22 Apr 19
Episcopal Cafe

“Now they are opening a crack for another’s well being. And at table they know him by his blessing and breaking of the bread.”

22 Apr 19
ogledalosf

I. The gas-bus carrying the Tolxi returning to their homes and farms echoed with songs and happy memories of the annual border market-fair. Milu Jost sat in the rear of the vehicle between his daughter on one side and Azo on the other. Hito and the ethnographer tended to remain silent, listening to the older […]

22 Apr 19
PAROUSIA Magazine

The Empty Pot When I’d suggested to my son that we move the seedlings from the foyer to the corner of our lot, I thought I was saying Goodbye in the usual, sheepish way but, in late fall, he marched out to the spot, arms around the pot as if he were a giant securing […]

22 Apr 19
The Cinemaholic

Netflix is packed with an infinite catalog of thrilling, racy, and some of the best crime dramas. And a subset of these action-packed shows deal predominantly with police procedurals. If you want to check out some edgy, engaging, and gritty titles that specifically belong to this genre, then you have come to the right place. […]

22 Apr 19
Always The Window Seat

After 15 hours of traveling we arrived at Osaka airport.  We had made arrangements to meet a guide at the Kyoto Train Station (about an hour train ride) to help us get situated and show us part of Kyoto, where we would be staying for the next week.  Japanese trains and train stations are on […]