Zendesk

17 Jul 19
T W E N T Y N I N E T E E N

I haven’t had a blog post in a while but I promise it’s for good reason. Life has been BUSY in the best way possible. There has been a lot of progress made on goals and I’m excited to be getting closer and closer to checking a few more off the list. One of my […]

17 Jul 19
Daily Democrat
Pete Buttigieg raised more money from large-dollar donors in California over the last three months than home-state Senator Kamala Harris, fundraising reports released Monday night showed, with a flood of cash from Silicon Valley and Hollywood propelling him to the front of the presidential pack. The Indiana mayor raised $3.75 million between April and the end of June from Californians who gave his campaign more than $200, compared with $3.18 million taken in by Harris. Campaigns aren’t required to report smaller donations individually, but Buttigieg also raised more than double the amount Harris did from lower-dollar contributions nationwide. It’s a remarkable achievement by a mayor of a small Midwestern city who just a few months ago was a virtual unknown in California — and a sign of the excitement his campaign has been able to generate among the Golden State elite. The numbers also could be worrying for Harris supporters, although the senator saw a big spike in the last days of the fundraising period after her breakout debate performance. Buttigieg was followed in California by Harris, former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, with the same five candidates forming the top tier in the money race nationally as well. He also raised the most from large-dollar donors in the Bay Area, a total of $1.6 million, according to a Bay Area News Group analysis. California is considered the nation’s biggest ATM in Democratic politics, and it’s shaping up to play a similar role in the 2020 race — almost all of the candidates had San Francisco, Los Angeles or both among the top fives cities where they raised the most money. About half of Harris’ total and roughly a fourth of Buttigieg’s, Sanders’ and Warren’s hauls came from Californians. Buttigieg has crisscrossed the state for a busy schedule of fundraisers this quarter, winning over Hollywood and LGBT donors excited about the prospect of making him the first gay president. His star-studded donor list this quarter included actors such as Ellen DeGeneres, Portia de Rossi, Frances McDormand and Leslie Odom, Jr. In the Bay Area, Buttigieg also used his longtime relationships with the tech community — he was Facebook’s 287th user as a Harvard undergrad — to rake in Silicon Valley money from big names such as Pinterest CEO Ben Silbermann, Y Combinator chair Sam Altman, DoorDash CEO Tony Xu and Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane. Harris, meanwhile, reported donations from director Rob Reiner, actor Sean Penn, L.A. philanthropist Eli Broad and Apple executive Lisa Jackson, the former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. In some ways, Harris and Buttigieg have similar fundraising profiles. Unlike several of their top competitors, they’ve embarked on plenty of meet-and-greets with high rollers while also snapping up large amounts of small-dollar donors online. About 45 percent of Harris’ total haul and 44 percent of Buttigieg’s came from people who gave less than $200. But Buttigieg raised more than twice as much as Harris nationwide between April and June and ended last month with $22.7 million in the bank, compared with $13.3 million for Harris. Harris saw sluggish fundraising numbers for most of the quarter — until she stepped onto the debate stage in late June, challenging Biden over his record on busing and integration policies. Over the next three days, she raised roughly a fourth of the total she took in for the period, her report suggests. In addition to the top five candidates, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker did relatively well in California, raising $710,000 from large-dollar donors, including plenty of venture capital executives and other tech figures. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, on the other hand, raised only about $221,000 in California, a lackluster performance that contributed to his disappointing national total of $3.6 million. A large proportion of O’Rourke’s funds came from his home state of Texas, and he didn’t spend nearly as much time on the Golden State fundraising circuit as his top rivals in the race. Buttigieg doesn’t seem likely to let up on his pace of California fundraising. He’ll be back in the Bay Area next week for multiple events, including one in Mountain View hosted by Netflix CEO Reed Hastings.
17 Jul 19
My Softeng | Oxford | Softeng Daily

July 17, 2019 at 12:01PM French startup Stonly wants to empower users so that they can solve their issues by themselves. Instead of relying on customer support agents, Stonly wants to surface relevant content so that you can understand and solve issues. “I’m trying to take the opposite stance of chatbots," founder and CEO Alexis […]

17 Jul 19

French startup Stonly wants to empower users so that they can solve their issues by themselves. Instead of relying on customer support agents, Stonly wants to surface relevant content so that you can understand and solve issues. “I’m trying to take the opposite stance of chatbots," founder and CEO Alexis Fogel told me. “The issue […]

17 Jul 19
TechCrunch
French startup Stonly wants to empower users so that they can solve their issues by themselves. Instead of relying on customer support agents, Stonly wants to surface relevant content so that you can understand and solve issues. “I’m trying to take the opposite stance of chatbots," founder and CEO Alexis Fogel told me. “The issue [with chatbots] is that technology is not good enough and you often end up searching through the help center.” If you’re in charge of support for a big enough service, chances are your customers often face the same issues. Many companies have built help centers with lengthy articles. But most customers won’t scroll through those pages when they face an issue. That’s why Stonly thinks you need to make this experience more interactive. The service lets you create scripted guides with multiple questions to make this process less intimidating. Some big companies have built question-based help centers, but Stonly wants to give tools to small companies so they can build their own scenarios. A Stonly module is basically a widget you can embed on any page or blog. It works like a deck of slides with buttons to jump to the relevant slide. Companies can create guides in the back end without writing a single line of code. You can add an image, a video and some code to each slide. At any time, you can see a flowchart of your guide to check that everything works as expected. You can translate your guides in multiple languages, as well. Once you’re done and the module is live, you can look back at your guides and see how you can improve them. Stonly lets you see if users spend more time on a step, close the tab and drop in the middle of the guide, test multiple versions of the same guide, etc. But the startup goes one step further by integrating directly with popular support services, such as Zendesk and Intercom. For instance, if a user contacts customer support after checking a Stonly guide, you can see in Zendesk what they were looking at. Or you can integrate Stonly in your Intercom chat module. As expected, a service like Stonly can help you save on customer support. If users can solve their own issues, you need a smaller customer support team. But that's not all. “It’s not just about saving money, it’s also about improving engagement and support,” Fogel said. Password manager company Dashlane is a good example of that. Fogel previously co-founded Dashlane before starting Stonly. And it’s one of Stonly’s first clients. “Dashlane is a very addictive product, but the main issue is that you want to help people get started,” he said. It’s true that it can be hard to grasp how you’re supposed to use a password manager if you’ve never used one in the past. So the onboarding experience is key with this kind of product. Stonly is free if you want to play with the product and build public guides. But if you want to create private guides and access advanced features, the company has a Pro plan ($30 per month) and a Team plan (starting at $100 per month with bigger bills as you add more people to your team and use the product more extensively). The company has tested its product with a handful of clients, such as Dashlane, Devialet, Happn and Malt. The startup has raised an undisclosed seed round from Eduardo Ronzano, Thibaud Elzière, Nicolas Steegmann, Renaud Visage and PeopleDoc co-founders. And Stonly is currently part of the Zendesk incubator at Station F. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qy28vx52GSQ
17 Jul 19
VentureBeat
Building any new digital product, service, or feature can be fraught with challenges from the outset — but when it’s ready to go to market, explaining clearly to users how it works and what its benefits are is integral to its chances of success. And that’s why Alexis Fogel, cofounder and former chief product officer at Dashlane, elected to launch Stonly, a startup that focuses squarely on helping product teams, customer support staff, and even bloggers explain how certain tools and services work. Stonly was founded in 2018, and for the past seven months it has been in private beta mode with a handful of customers — including its first client Dashlane — ahead of today’s official unveiling. In a nutshell, Stonly is striving to help businesses generate interactive, step-by-step online guides that can be embedded anywhere, such as a blog, a company’s customer support webpage, or directly inside customer support software such as Zendesk. “Stonly solves two problems that every company has: explaining how their product or service works, and providing accurate and digestible user support information,” Fogel told VentureBeat. By way of example, a company or publisher could create a guide on how to switch from iPhone to Android, how to manage your Facebook privacy, or how to activate dark mode in iOS 13, and then embed this walkthrough on a website — replete with text, photos, illustrations, videos, and code snippets. [iframe id=”ston-461″ width=”100%” height=”710″ frameBorder=”0″ name=”StonlyExplanation” allowfullscreen src=”https://stonly.com/embed/461/view/”%5D [/iframe] Troubleshooting Stonly is a completely different proposition to that of Dashlane — but it was Fogel’s experiences at Dashlane that encouraged him to jump ship for this new venture. “As Dashlane cofounder and chief product officer, I was focused on the global customer experience and was overseeing the user support team,” Fogel said. “As [the] user base at Dashlane grew, so did the number of issues with the product and the support. I was frustrated that there was no solution that could provide a good troubleshooting experience to the user, nor one that could provide interactive guides to users while getting useful insights on where they got stuck.” Fogel began building the foundations of Stonly as a side project while still at Dashlane — and when he realized there was a genuine need to join the dots between support content and product at every company, he was convinced this problem needed his full attention. Moreover, he also convinced Krzysztof Dąbrowski, who oversaw UI and UX design at Dashlane, to join him as cofounder. “I founded Dashlane when I was still in college, and always wanted to apply the knowledge from Dashlane to a new venture,” Fogel added. A quick peek elsewhere in the product support realm reveals a burgeoning landscape for support tools and product walkthrough guides. San Francisco-based WalkMe, for example, operates a “digital adoption platform” that enables companies to integrate user-centric product walkthroughs into their software — it raised $50 million last year, taking its total funding past the $200 million mark. Then there’s Boston-based Appcues, which raised a $10 million series A round last year for a user experience platform that includes tools for creating product walkthroughs and prompts. Elsewhere, Raleigh’s Pendo closed a $50 million round, and Whatfix nabbed $12.5 million for a digital adoption platform that show users how to use the software. At its core, Stonly is a similar proposition to all of these, except its guides aren’t strictly part of the specific software product — they can be embedded pretty much anywhere online. “We allow companies to create comprehensive guides that can answer all the issues from the users, embed them contextually where they are the most relevant, and get data about their usage to improve them and the product they describe overtime,” Fogel said. “We are the first company focused on productizing support.” Stonly guides can be embedded in a number of ways. A link can be pasted to any website that supports Embed.ly, which includes Medium, Reddit, Kickstarter, Livefyre, and Disqus. Alternatively, iFrame code can be used in content management systems (CMS) such as WordPress. And a special Stonly widget can be added to any website, which allows companies to include contextual support guides to users in situ as they’re using a service. Stonly widget Business Stonly is making its business model clear from the get-go, with three core plans. There is a free incarnation that allows users to create up to 20 public “stonlies,” as the company calls them, but they will run ads, and the product also lacks some premium features. There is a pro version, costing $29 per month, that enables unlimited public and private stonlies and analytics. And the Team offering, which weighs in at $99 per month, includes additional tools such as the ability to manage user access rights, advanced embedding options (such as Zendesk integration), multiple languages, and more. The analytics, specifically, could be a core selling point for many potential customers — it outlines how people are interacting with a particular guide, how long they’re spending on each step, and where they may be dropping off. Stonly analytics   It’s also worth noting here that Stonly has closed a seed round of funding to see it through its development and launch phases — Fogel didn’t divulge a figure, but he did note that Eventbrite CTO Renaud Visage was among the backers. Stonly is officially open to the public starting today.
16 Jul 19
AviTrader Aviation News

Component Control held their 14th annual QUE Group user conference from June 18th – June 20th on Coronado Island. The members-only conference reviewed the transformative year Component Control has had in developments and highlighted upcoming enhancements and innovations to be released. Through interactional workshops and round tables, users from over 100 companies expressed their satisfaction […]

16 Jul 19
Will's IT News

I just finished my second Tech Tuesday here at work and can already tell that we are making progress on many fronts. For a quick summary of what we discussed today, here are some tasks that I need to complete this week. Tickets Last Tuesday, I mentioned how I was in the process of using […]

16 Jul 19
News Directory

More money from large-dollar donors in California over the last three months t pack. The Indiana mayor raised $ 3.75 million from last year, as compared to $ 3.18 million taken by Harris. From the lower-dollar contributions of nationalist countries. Was a virtual unknown in California. T For the last few days in the last […]

16 Jul 19
The Mercury News
Pete Buttigieg raised more money from large-dollar donors in California over the last three months than home-state Senator Kamala Harris, fundraising reports released Monday night showed, with a flood of cash from Silicon Valley and Hollywood propelling him to the front of the presidential pack. The Indiana mayor raised $3.75 million between April and the end of June from Californians who gave his campaign more than $200, compared with $3.18 million taken in by Harris. Campaigns aren’t required to report smaller donations individually, but Buttigieg also raised more than double the amount Harris did from lower-dollar contributions nationwide. It’s a remarkable achievement by a mayor of a small Midwestern city who just a few months ago was a virtual unknown in California — and a sign of the excitement his campaign has been able to generate among the Golden State elite. The numbers also could be worrying for Harris supporters, although the senator saw a big spike in the last days of the fundraising period after her breakout debate performance. Buttigieg was followed in California by Harris, former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, with the same five candidates forming the top tier in the money race nationally as well. He also raised the most from large-dollar donors in the Bay Area, a total of $1.6 million, according to a Bay Area News Group analysis. [dfm_iframe src=”https://extras.mercurynews.com/politics/2019-7-buttigieg-ca-fundraising.html” width=”100%” height=”1130px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”no” /] California is considered the nation’s biggest ATM in Democratic politics, and it’s shaping up to play a similar role in the 2020 race — almost all of the candidates had San Francisco, Los Angeles or both among the top fives cities where they raised the most money. About half of Harris’ total and roughly a fourth of Buttigieg’s, Sanders’ and Warren’s hauls came from Californians. Buttigieg has crisscrossed the state for a busy schedule of fundraisers this quarter, winning over Hollywood and LGBT donors excited about the prospect of making him the first gay president. His star-studded donor list this quarter included actors such as Ellen DeGeneres, Portia de Rossi, Frances McDormand and Leslie Odom, Jr. In the Bay Area, Buttigieg also used his longtime relationships with the tech community — he was Facebook’s 287th user as a Harvard undergrad — to rake in Silicon Valley money from big names such as Pinterest CEO Ben Silbermann, Y Combinator chair Sam Altman, DoorDash CEO Tony Xu and Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane. Harris, meanwhile, reported donations from director Rob Reiner, actor Sean Penn, L.A. philanthropist Eli Broad and Apple executive Lisa Jackson, the former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. In some ways, Harris and Buttigieg have similar fundraising profiles. Unlike several of their top competitors, they’ve embarked on plenty of meet-and-greets with high rollers while also snapping up large amounts of small-dollar donors online. About 45 percent of Harris’ total haul and 44 percent of Buttigieg’s came from people who gave less than $200. But Buttigieg raised more than twice as much as Harris nationwide between April and June and ended last month with $22.7 million in the bank, compared with $13.3 million for Harris. Sen. Kamala Harris chats with former Vice President Joe Biden during the second night of the first Democratic presidential debate in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Harris saw sluggish fundraising numbers for most of the quarter — until she stepped onto the debate stage in late June, challenging Biden over his record on busing and integration policies. Over the next three days, she raised roughly a fourth of the total she took in for the period, her report suggests. In addition to the top five candidates, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker did relatively well in California, raising $710,000 from large-dollar donors, including plenty of venture capital executives and other tech figures. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, on the other hand, raised only about $221,000 in California, a lackluster performance that contributed to his disappointing national total of $3.6 million. A large proportion of O’Rourke’s funds came from his home state of Texas, and he didn’t spend nearly as much time on the Golden State fundraising circuit as his top rivals in the race. Buttigieg doesn’t seem likely to let up on his pace of California fundraising. He’ll be back in the Bay Area next week for multiple events, including one in Mountain View hosted by Netflix CEO Reed Hastings.
16 Jul 19
Pulse 2.0

GetAccept is an all-in-one sales platform combining video, live chat, proposal design, document tracking, and e-signature company that recently announced it raised $7 million.

16 Jul 19
Tech Insight Reports

Industry Overview of  Call Recording Software Market The global Call Recording Software market research report studies market overview defining; definition, types, applications latest trends to identify the revenues and the progress of the market over the forecast period. The report offers preventive and premeditated management along with emphasizes the summary of the global Call Recording Software […]